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College Misericordia 




Academic Catalog 
Undergraduate Studies 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/undergr8991mise 




College Misericordia Academic Catalog 

Undergraduate Studies 

Effective August, 1989 



CONTACTS 



Academic Affairs 

Admissions 

Athletics 

Business Matters 

Continuing Education 

Financial Aid 

Freshman Year 
Experience 

Institutional 
Advancement 

Registrar's Office 

Religious Life 

Student Life 



For more information on particular aspects of College Misericordia, 
contact the people listed below at 717-675-2181 between 8:30 a.m. and 
4:30 p.m. Other College personnel are listed in the College Directory 
section of this catalog. All mail to College Misericordia faculty and 
administration may be addressed to College Misericordia, 
Dallas, Pa. 18612. 

Sister Mary Glennon, Academic Dean 

{Catherine Flanagan-Herstek, Assistant to the Academic Dean 

David Payne, Dean of Admissions 

John Howe, Director of Athletics 

Thomas E. O'Neil, Dean of Financial and Administrative Affairs 

Thomas J. O'Neill, Director of Continuing Education 

Jane Dessoye, Director of Financial Aid 

Katherine Foley, Director 

Linda Stallone, Executive Director 

Paula Wilkes, Registrar 

Reverend John Petrasko, Director of Campus Ministry 

Scott J. Kalicki, Dean of Students 

Sister Robert Marie Lochman, Assistant to the Dean of Students 



I'oi k ^ si \i [ mi \is 



This catalog contains current information regarding College 
Misericordia's calendar, admissions policies, degree 
requirements, fees and regulations. College Misericordia 
reserves the right in its sole judgment to promulgate and 
change rules and regulations and to make changes of any kind 
in its programs, calendar, admissions policies, procedures and 
standards, degree requirements and fees whenever it is deemed 
necessary or desirable, including changes in course content, the 
rescheduling of classes, and cancellation of scheduled classes 
and other academic activities. 

College Misericordia accords students of any race, color, 
religion, sex, nationality or ethnic origin all the rights, 
privileges, programs and activities generally made available to 
students of the College. College Misericordia does not 
discriminate on the basis of race, color, handicap, religion, sex, 
nationality or ethnic origin in the administration of its 
educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan 
programs, athletic or other College-administered programs. 

College Misericordia complies with the Family Education 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended. A copy of the 
Act is available for inspection in the office of the Academic 
Dean. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Mission Statement 3 

Accreditations 6 

The Curricula 4 

Academic Divisions 4 

Academic Program Definitions 7 

Core Curriculum Requirements 9 

Honors Program 11 

Majors, Specializations and 

Certifications 4 

Major Program Descriptions/Sequences 13 

Minor Programs 89 

Elective Studies 94 

Course Descriptions 95 

College Regulations 168 

Admission Requirements 168 

Academic Information 173 

Special Programs 187 

Tuition and Fees 193 

Financial Assistance 196 

Endowed Scholarships 202 

Refund Policies 203 

College Life 207 

Student Activities 207 

Athletics 207 

Campus Ministry 208 

Careers and Placement 208 

Commuter Council 208 

Counseling 208 

Library 209 

Residence Halls 210 

Student Health Services 210 

College Directory 

Board of Trustees 212 

Administration 214 

Faculty Senate 217 

Academic Committee Chairs 218 

Faculty 219 

Alumni Association 223 

Index 228 



MISSION STATEMENT 



College Misericordia is a Catholic, liberal arts-based, co-educational college. It was founded in 1924 
and it is sponsored by the Religious Sisters of Mercy. The college offers both undergraduate and 
graduate programs. In 1978, the Board of Trustees approved a mission statement that notes the 
nature and purpose of the College, and in 1984 it was revised as follows: 

College Misericordia is a Catholic college sponsored by the 
Religious Sisters of Mercy. A co-educational institution which 
welcomes individuals of all faiths, Misericordia offers a variety 
of liberal arts and professional programs at the undergraduate 
level in addition to professional graduate programs. 

The education of each undergraduate student is based on the 
College's commitment to the complementary relationship 
between liberal arts and professional studies. To emphasize 
academic excellence and to develop critical thinking, College 
Misericordia provides a liberal arts base for all four-year 
academic curricula. Professional education, as well as 
education in the arts and sciences, prepares students for 
productive careers and continued professional growth. 

College Misericordia provides a cooperative environment in 
which students, faculty, and administration demonstrate 
personal concern for each individual as a valued member of the 
campus community. In addition to academic pursuits, students 
can participate in a wide range of spiritual, recreational, social, 
and cultural activities. 

The College's commitment to provide affordable, quality 
education continues to express the founding Sisters' values and 
attitudes of justice, mercy, and service. 



THE CURRICULA 

Academic Divisions 



College Misericordia's academic programs are administered by six distinct divisions. The programs 
offered by each division are listed below: 

Division of Allied Health Professions - Elaine Halesey, Chair 

Majors: Medical Technology, p. 45 

Occupational Therapy, p. 54 
Radiography, p. 73 

Minor: Management, p. 85 

(This minor is taken with the Radiography major.) 

Specializations: Education, p. 84 

Management, p. 85 

(These specializations are taken with the Radiography major.) 
The Division of Allied Health Professions offers a Master of Science degree in Occupational Therapy 
Leadership. See Graduate Catalog for details. 

Division of Business Administration - Gale Rand, Chair 

Majors: Accounting, pp. 13, 14 

Business Administration, pp. 17, 18 

(The major in Business Administration requires a special- 
ization in Management or Marketing. Students may elect an 
additional specialization or a minor.) 
Management Information Systems, p. 19 

Minors: Accounting, p. 89 

Management, p. 91 
Marketing, p. 91 

Specializations: Managerial Accounting (CMA), p. 14 

Public Accounting (CPA), p. 13 
Management (Business), p. 17 
Marketing (Business), p. 18 

Division of Humanities - Donald Fries, Chair 

Majors: English, p. 37 

History, p. 40 

General Studies (Program Administered Interdivisionally), p. 38 
Liberal Studies (Program Administered Interdivisionally), p. 42 

Minors: English, p. 90 

History, p. 91 
Philosophy, p. 92 
Political Science, p. 92 
Religious Studies, p. 92 
Writing, p. 93 

Specializations: Pre-Law (This specialization may be taken with the 

English, History or Liberal Studies majors.) pp. 70, 71, 

72 



THE CURRICULA 

Academic Divisions 



Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Computer Science - Carl Konecke, Chair 
Majors: 



\f:nors: 



Specializations: 



Biology, p. 16 

Computer Science, p. 21 

Mathematics, p. 43 

Mathematics/Computer Science (combined major), p. 44 

Biology, p. 89 
Chemistry, p 89 
Computer Science, p. 90 
Mathematics, p. 91 

Pre-Dentistry, p. 68 

Pre-Medicine, p. 68 

Pre-Optometry, p. 68 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine, p. 68 

(These specializations are taken with the Biology major.) 

Elective areas of Study: Science, p. 94 

Dhision of Nursing - Gertrude Torres, Chair 

Major: Nursing, p. 47 

Certification: School Nurse, p. 87 

The Division of Nursing offers a Master of Science degree in Nursing. See Graduate Catalog for 

details. 

Di\ision of Professional Studies - James Calderone, Acting Chair 



Majors: 



Minors. 



Certifications: 



Specializations: 



Elective areas of study: 



Elementary Education, p. 22 
Social Work, p. 88 
Special Education, p. 32 

Gerontology, p. 90 
Psychology, p. 92 

Addictions Counseling, p. 15 
Child Welfare Services, p. 20 
Early Childhood Education, p. 27 
Elementary Education, p. 22 
Gerontology, p. 39 
Special Education, p. 32 

Addictions Counseling, p. 15 
Child Welfare, p. 20 
Gerontology, p. 39 

Psychology, p. 94 
Sociology, p. 94 



The Division of Professional Studies offers Master of Science degrees in Human Services 
Administration and Education. See Graduate Catalog for details. 



ACCREDITATIONS 



College Misericordia was chartered by the State of Pennsylvania on 
January 31, 1927, and is empowered to grant the following degrees: 

Master of Science in Nursing 

Master of Science 

Bachelor of Arts 

Bachelor of Science 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Bachelor of Social Work 

Associate of Applied Sciences 

College Misericordia is officially recognized by the following 
accrediting agencies: 

Council on Social Work Education 

Department of Education, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

The Regents of the University of the State of New York 

Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Schools 

National League for Nursing 

Committee on Allied Health Education Accreditation of the 
American Medical Association in collaboration with 
the Accreditation Committee of the American 
Occupational Therapy Association 

Committee on Allied Health Education Accreditation of the 
American Medical Association in collaboration with 
the Joint Review Committee on Education in 
Radiologic Technology. 

College Misericordia has legal permission from the Pennsylvania 
State Board of Nurse Examiners to operate a School of Nursing in 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Various other state education departments also recognize College 
Misericordia's academic programs. 



THE CURRICULA 

Academic Program Definitions 



Majors 



All College Misericordia students are required to fulfill a 54-credit 
liberal arts core curriculum in addition to the requirements of their 
chosen major. The core courses provide both a sound educational 
foundation and a perspective from which to choose a major field or 
specialized area of study. 

College Misericordia's academic programs fall into five inter-related 
groups: majors, specializations, certifications, minors, and elective 
areas of study. These program areas are defined below: 

Areas of study in a formal discipline for which a degree is awarded, 
for example, a Bachelor of Arts degree in History, a Bachelor of Social 
Work degree in Social Work, or Bachelor of Science degree in 
Mathematics. 



Specializations 



Certification 



Minors 



Elective Areas of Study 



Focused programs of extended study closely associated with a specific 
degree program. Specializations are generally available only to 
students who have been accepted into the major for the specific 
degree, for example: B. A. /History (Pre-Law) or B.S. /Biology (Pre- 
Medicine). 

Prescribed programs of study designed to meet requirements of 
official agencies which recognize the certification as a valid 
credential, for example. Early Childhood Education certification 
recognized by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. 

Focused programs of study which involve specific clusters of courses 
around a general area of study. Minors are not associated with 
particular degree programs and are therefore open to all students, for 
example: writing, philosophy, and religious studies. 

Clusters of courses which are not as a group directly associated with 
a specific degree program. These elective courses are intended to 
augment the liberal arts background of any interested student, for 
example: philosophy or sociology. 



THE CURRICULA 

Academic Program Listings 



Specific Degree Programs 



Minor Programs 



Elective Areas 



Course Descriptions 



In the academic program listings which follow, majors, specializa- 
tions and certifications are combined into one section and are listed 
alphabetically by program name. They have been grouped together 
by virtue of their one common factor—each requires defined course 
sequences. 

Minors, which are open to all students, may be taken in association 
with any degree program. Minors involve 15 to 22 credits in specific 
areas. The minors offered by the College and their course 
requirements are grouped together under the heading Minor 
Programs. 

Elective areas of study are briefly described in the section headed 
Elective Areas of Study. 

Specific information regarding every course offered by the College 
may be found in the Course Descriptions section of this catalog. 



THE CURRICULA 

Core Curriculum Requirements 



All students, regardless of major, are required to complete a minimum of fifty-four (54) credit hours of core 
courses. These courses must be taken in accordance with the distribution of credit hours by area of study 
described below, and must be selected from the list of core course titles on the following page, or from the 
list of approved substitutes noted below. 

Some courses must be taken in sequence, and both semesters of courses which are offered over two semesters 
must be completed. 



AREA OF STUDY 


CREDITS 


Anthropology 


3 


English Composition 


3 


English Literature 


6 


Fine Arts 


6 


History 


6 


Mathematics* 


6 



AREA OF STUDY 


CRED 


Philosophy 


6 


Political Science 


3 


Psychology 


3 


Religious Studies 


6 


Science 


6 



* All students are required to take six (6) credits of Mathematics, three (3) from Bank I and three (3) from 
Bank II. 



Mathematics Bank I 



Mathematics Bank II 



(Determined by Placement Test) 

MTH 90 Mathematics I 

MTH 095 College Algebra and Trigonometry 

MTH151 Calculus I 



(Specified by Program) 

MTH 100 Mathematical Perspectives 

MTH 115 Basic Statistics I 

MTH 151 Calculus I 

MTH 152 Calculus II 

BUS 140 Quantitative Methods I 

EXCEPTIONS: Students enrolled in selected major programs of study may substitute a prescribed, more 
advanced course in a given area to fulfill the core requirement. Refer to the suggested sequence of required 
courses for individual majors. Other qualified students**may exercise the same option. 

Students in certain major programs may consider the following courses as proper substitutes for the normal 
course requirements in the areas listed: 



APPROYED SUBSTITUTE COURSE(S) FULFILLS 

Biology 101-102 (8 credits) Science Core 

Chemistry 104-105 (6 credits) Science Core 

Physics 101-102 (6 credits) Science Core 

Physics 221-222 (8 credits) Science Core 



IF STUDENTS MAJOR IS 

Biology; Medical Technology 

Nursing 

Radiography 

Computer Science; Mathematics 



**Students m other major programs who demonstrate competence in any of the areas listed above may. with 
the approval of the Chair of the Division and the Academic Dean, exercise these same options. 



Ifl. 



THE CURRICULA 

Core Curriculum Requirements 



CORE AREAS 

Anthropology 

English 
Composition 

English Literature 



Fine Arts 
History 

Mathematics 
Philosophy 



REQUIRED 
CREDITS 



Political Science 

Psychology 
Religious Studies 



Science 



COURSE NUMBER/COURSE TITLE CREDITS 

SOC 110 Anthropology 3 



ENG 103 



Composition 



Select f ENG 221-222 Major British Writers 

One ENG 247-248 American Literature 

Sequence I ENG 266-267 Western World Literature 

FA 201-202 Civilization Through Art 

Select THIS 101-102 History of Western 

One Civilization 

Sequence ( HIS 103-104 History of United States 



MTU Mathematics Bank I 

Mathematics Bank II 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 

PHL 225 Ethics 

PHL 257 Philosophy of Religion 

PHL 260 Practical Logic 

PHL 290 Philosophy of Person 

POL 100 American National 

Government 

PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 

RLS 100 Biblical Studies 

RLS 103 Moral Theology 

RLS 104 World Religions 

RLS 106 Theology and Human 

Experience 

RLS 1 1 1 Christology 

RLS 113 Theology of the Church 

RLS 115 Religion in America 



Select 
One 



Select 
Two 



Select BIO 103-104 General Biology I & II 
One CHM 103-104 General Chemistry I & II 

Sequence PHY 107-108 Introduction to Physics I & II 



54 



1 1 



THE CURRICULA 



Honors Program 
Director, Rcgina Kelly, R.S.M., Ph.D. 



Honors 



Admission 

to the 

Honors 
Program 



The Honors Program at College Misericordia is open to academically qualified 
students whatever their major field of study because the Program is based in 9 
selected courses within the core curriculum required of all students in the 
college. (See p. 7 for Core Curriculum.) 



Core Curriculum courses which carry an Honors Section (Sec. 07) are as 
follows: 

ENG 103 Composition 

ENG 266-267 Western World Literature 

HIS 101-102 Western Civilization 



PHL 101 Contemporary Self-Images 

PHL 257 Philosophy of Religion 

POL 100 American National Gov't 

RLS 1(14 World Religions 

Honors Credits 



3 
6 
6 

3 
3 
3 
3 

27 



The Director of the Honors Program, in consultation with the Admissions 
Office, Members of Honors Faculty, Director of Freshman Year Experience, 
and Division Chairs, selects candidates for the Program. Freshman students 
may be admitted to Pre-Honors status; upon completion of 6 credits in 
designated Honors sections of the scheduled core courses, students with a 
cumulative GPA of 3.0 and an Honors GPA of 3.0 may continue on the Honors 
schedule. 



Honors 
(nurse 
Sequence 



All Honors courses are listed on the Master Schedule as Section 07 . 
sequence is as follows: 



The 



Freshman Year 

ENG 103 (07) 3 credits 

(Fall Semester) 

HIS 101, 102 (07) 6 credits 

(Two Semesters) 

♦POL 100 (07) 3 credits 

(Spring Semester) 



Sophomore Year 

ENG 266, 267 (07) 6 credits 

(Two Semesters) 

*PHL 100 (07) 3 credits 

(Spring Semester) 



♦Permission to take these courses at non-sequenced times must be obtained 
from the Director of Honors. 

Junior Year 

PHL 257 (07) 3 credits 

(Fall Semester) 

RLS 104 (07) 3 credits 

(Spring Semester) 



A GPA of 3.0 must be maintained in these courses. 



12 



Continuance 
in the 
Honors 
Program 



Experience 



THE CURRICULA 



Honors Program (cont.) 

Student records are reviewed at the end of each semester and Honors students 
are advised of their current status in the program, depending on: 

successful (3.0 or above) completion of Honors courses; 

semester interviews with the Director of the Program; 

participation in activities of the Student Honors Association. 
No student may continue to receive benefits of the Honors Program without 
adherence to the steps outlined above. 

Honors Upperclassmen whose GPA shows a steady maintenance of 3.4 or above may be 



admitted to specific Honors sections (07) of the core curriculum upon 
recommendation of the faculty and approval by the Honors Director. They may 
enjoy the experience of taking Honors sections and of belonging to the Student 
Honors Association. They are not, however, eligible for either College Honors 
or Degree Honors except under extraordinary circumstances. The same 
privileges and restrictions apply to transfer students and to non-traditional 
students. 

Level of ^ ne honors Program consists of two levels: 

Honors 1. The College Honors level can be attained by successful completion (3.0 or 

above) of the 9 Honors courses listed on the preceding page, plus a 3.0 overall 
cumulative GPA. Students who achieve this distinction will have the College 
Honors designation noted on their transcripts. 

2. The Degree Honors level goes beyond the GPA required for College Honors : 
students who, at the end of their Junior year, have completed College Honors 
courses with a GPA of 3.4 or above may be invited to register for the Senior 
Honors Seminar, a 3 credit course in research on the upper Honors level. 
Successful completion of the Seminar results in 30 Honors credits and a 
designation of Degree Honors on each transcript. 

c • r Seniors admitted to the Honors Seminar spend the semester in researching a 

Honors topic in their major field and writing a scholarly paper on that topic. Approval 

Seminar °^ tne P a P er by tne Director of the Honors Program and the Division Chair of 

the major field may result in publication of the paper in the research-oriented 
Honors journal, HONORUS, nationally distributed and now in its fifth year of 
publication. 

The Senior Honors Seminar is usually scheduled for the Fall Semester. Students 
not only research and write the papers, they also edit the journal. In Spring 
each student author orally defends her/his paper to the College Community in 
an open forum. 

Student Honors Seniors constitute the Board of Directors of the Student Honors 

Honors Association. Meetings are conducted monthly and activities for the organization 

Association planned. Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior Honors students elect a 

representative to the Board of Directors. The Student Honors Association is 
chartered by the College Misericordia Student Government Association. All 
Honors students must be active members of the Student Honors Association. 



THE CURRICT I A 



13 



Specializations and 

Certifications 



Accounting Major 



Di\ision of Business Administration 

Degree: B.S. /Accounting 
Public Accounting Specialization 
Managerial Accounting Specialization 

Program Director: Fred Croop 

Accounting professionals are competent 
to serve society in more than an ordinary 
way. They have a responsibility to those 
they serve, their colleagues, and the 
public -- investors, consumers, and 
creditors. 

Accounting provides the information 
necessary to determine and evaluate the 
present and projected economic activities 
of organizations. The world of business 
affairs is the province of accountants. It 
is their role to apprehend it, analyze it, 
systematize it, and portray it. The more 
complex the world is, the more 
demanding is the role of the accountant. 

Accounting is a leading growth profession 
throughout the world. Professional 
accounting careers range from internal 
auditors and tax consultants, to 
managerial and financial officers and 
advisory sen ices. These jobs require not 
only knowledge and experience, but 
personal qualities of perception, 
imagination, judgment, ability to work 
well with others, communication skills, 
and problem solving techniques. Minors 
to be considered with this major include 
computer science, management, and 
marketing. 

All accounting majors are encouraged to 
serve in an Accounting Internship in the 
spring semester of their senior year. 
Placement of students in Internships will 
be dependent upon successful completion 
of required course work, availability of 
placement employers, and a successful 
internship search and interview on the 
part of the student. All course work in the 
major must carry a grade of "C" or better. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTING (CPA TRACK) 



FRF.SHMAN 



MTU Math Bank I 

I NG 103 English Composition 

HIS Core Elective 

BUS 100 Computing for Business 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 



SCI Core Elective 

FA 201 Civilization Through Art I 

ACC 201 Intermediate Accounting I 

BUS 205 Macroeconomics 

BUS 371 Business Financial 

Management 
ENG 112 Speech Communication 



I \( i Literature Core Elective 

ACC 301 Advanced Accounting I 
ACC 310 Cost Accounting 
BUS 300 Quantitative Methods I 
BUS 352 Business Law 



3 
3 
3 

3 
15 



SOC110 Anthropology 

POL 100 American Nat'l Govt 

HIS Core Elective 

PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II 



SOPHOMORE 



3 
3 
4 
3 

3 

3 

19 



BUS 208 Principles of Management 
BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 



JUNIOR 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 









SENIOR 


PHL 


Core Elective 




3 ACC 


RLS 


Core Elective 




3 


ACC 401 


Taxes I 




3 


ACC 410 


Auditing 




3 


ACC 472 


Accounting Internship 


1 


FREE 


Elective (non- 


major) 


3 
16 



ENG Literature Core Elective 

ACC 302 Advanced Accounting II 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 

RLS Core Elective 

BUS 350 Money and Banking 

FREE Elective (non-major) 



ACC 472 Accounting Internship 



Total required for graduation: 129 credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
L5 



SCI Core Elective 

FA 202 Civilization Through Art II 3 

ACC 202 Intermediate Accounting II 4 

BUS 206 Microeconomics 3 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
} 
> 



12 



12 



14 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



Accounting Major 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (CMA TRACK) 







FRESHMAN 






MTH 


Math Bank I 


3 


SOC110 


Anthropology 


3 


ENG 103 


English Composition 


3 


POL 100 


American Nat'l Gov't3 




HIS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS 


Core Elective 


3 


BUS 100 


Computing for Business 


3 


PSY 123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 

15 


ACC 102 


Principles of Accounting II 


3 

15 




< 


SOPHOMORE 






SCI 


Core Elective 


3 


SCI 


Core Elective 


3 


FA 201 


Civilization Through Art I 


3 


FA 202 


Civilization Through Art II 


3 


ACC 201 


Intermediate Accounting I 


4 


ACC 202 


Intermediate Accounting II 


4 


BUS 205 


Macroeconomics 


3 


BUS 206 


Microeconomics 


3 


BUS 371 


Business Financial 












Management 


3 


BUS 208 


Principles of Management 


3 


ENG 112 


Speech Communication 


3 
19 


FREE 


Elective (non-major) 


3 

19 






JUNIOR 






ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


PHL 101 


Contemporary Self Images 


3 


ACC 310 


Cost Accounting 


3 


ACC 311 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


BUS 300 


Quantitative Methods I 


3 


BUS 269 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


2 

15 


BUS 350 


Money and Banking 


3 

15 






SENIOR 






PHL 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


ACC 321 


Advanced Managerial 












Accounting 


3 


ACC 420 


Fund Accounting 


3 


ACC 471 


Accounting Internship 


1 


ACC 402 


Taxes II 


3 


BUS 352 


Business Law 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


FREE 


Elective (non-major) 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 
16 






15 



Total required for graduation: 129 credits. 



I? 



THE CT RRICl IA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



Addictions Counseling Certification 

The Addictions Counseling Certificate 
Program is designed to prepare 
graduates to work with the myriad of 
problems associated with chemical 
addictions. Substance abuse and 
addictions are among America's most 
devastating and pervasive social ills. 
Addiction respects neither age nor 
socioeconomic status and impacts on 
individuals, employers, families, and 
friends as well as the interrelationships 
of our most basic societal institutions. 
Its effects are also visible within many 
other social problems including crime, 
delinquency and family violence. 

A Certificate in Addictions involves a 
total of 15 credits. Social Work majors 
at College Misericordia who are 
pursuing the Certificate must complete 
a three-credit field practicum in 
addictions counseling at either the 
junior or senior level as part of the 
required sequence. All other students 
will have the option of taking an 
additional three-credit course in 
addictions in lieu of the field 
practicum. Graduates of the program 
will be prepared for responsible 
positions within human service 
agencies, health institutions and other 
settings serving the chemically 
dependent. 

All courses are C.A.C. approved for 
thirty hours of required instruction for 
Certified Addictions Counselors who 
are seeking re-certification. In 
addition, courses may be applied 
toward fulfillment of instructional 
requirements for the initial C.A.C. 
certification. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



ADC 222 Drug Pharmacology 3 

ADC 335 Substance Abuse in 

Special Populations 3 

ADC 337 Substance 

Abuse /Treatment Methods 3 

Two (2) additional courses selected from the following: 



ADC 333 


Substance Abuse in the 






Adolescent Population 


(3) 


ADC 341 


Substance Abuse 






and the Aged 


(3) 


ADC 339 


Substance Abuse 






and Criminality 


(3) 


ADC 340 


Alcoholism 


(3) 



Approved Field Practicum 



Total: 15 credits 



16 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



Biology Major 



Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Computer Science 

Degree: B.S. /Biology 

Program Director: Carl Konecke 



With the proper selection of elective 
courses, a biology major is prepared for 
post-graduate studies in medicine, 
veterinary medicine, dentistry, podiatry, 
optometry, or for graduate study in 
various diciplines within biology and 
related fields. 

Preparation for post graduate employment 
in biological or biochemical research is 
also available through the appropriate 
selection of course offerings. 

Biology majors are assigned an advisor 
who helps plan a program of courses 
consistent with the student's background 
and career objectives. (Majors in biology 
must maintain at least a "B" average, cum 
GPA = 3.0, to be recommended to graduate 
or professional schools) 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



ENG 103 Composition 
HIS Core Elective 

CHM 133 Chemical Principles I 
MTU 151 Calculus I 
BIO 101 General Botany and 
Biological Principles 



FRESHMAN 




3 MTH 115 Statistics 


3 


3 HIS Core Elective 


3 


4 CHM 134 Chemical Principles II 


4 


3 MTH 152 Calculus II 


3 


BIO 102 General Zoology 


4 



17 



17 





Si 


:)PI 


IOMORE 






BIO 241 


Genetics 


4 


BIO 243 


General Microbiology 


4 


BIO 251 


Comparative Anatomy 




SOC110 


Anthropology 


3 




and Histotechnique I 


4 


PSY 123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


CHM 243 


Organic Chemistry I 


4 


CHM 244 Organic Chemistry II 


4 


FA 201 


Civilization through Art I 


3 
15 


FA 202 


Civilization through Art II 


3 
1~7 






JUNIOR 






ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


CHM 353 Biochemistry 


3 


CHM 


Elective 


3 


PHY 221 


General Physics I 


4 


PHY 222 


General Physics II 


4 


BIO 322 


Comparative Embryology 
of Vertebrates 


3 


BIO 346 


General Physiology 


4 


CPS 101 


Introduction to 
Programming: PASCAL 


3 

lf» 






14 






SENIOR 






BIO 425 


Ecology 


4 


BIO 360 


Immunology 


1 


BIO 490 


Coordinating Seminar 


1 


BIO 480 


Biology Research 


1 


BIO 


Elective 


1 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


PHL101 


Contemporary Self Images 3 


PHL 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 






!t 


POL 100 


American Natl Gov't 


3 
14 



Total required for graduation: 124 credits 



THE CI RRICULA 



r 



Uu iors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



Business Administration Major 
Management Specialization 



Division of Business Administration 
Degree: B.S./ Business Administration 
Program Director: Donald C. Skiff 

Students who major in business 
administration choose to focus on a 
specific area of the business environment. 
College Misericordia's business program 
offers specializations in management and 
marketing. Other foci are possible through 
the college's Liberal Studies program. 

To succeed in a professional business 
atmosphere, individuals must have a well- 
rounded background in all aspects of 
business, as well as a firm grounding in the 
liberal arts. College Misericordia's 
business administration program provides 
the proper balance of both theory and 
practice. Its goals are to provide students 
with an understanding of the nature of 
Society and to assist them in developing a 
social philosophy, which is necessary for 
responsible citizenship; to familiarize 
students with the American economic 
system and the major functional areas of 
business; and to afford students the 
opportunity to develop and to increase 
their capacity for analysis, evaluation, and 
strategic implementation of concepts. 

For the last ten years, graduates of the 
Business programs at College Misericordia 
have attained a 97% job placement rate 
which compares very favorably to national 
trends. Business Administration Majors 
are well prepared to continue their studies 
at the graduate level. 

All course work in the major must carry 
a grade of "C" or better. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



MTU Math Bank I 

ENG 103 English Composition 



HIS 



Core Elective 



FRESHMAN 

3 SOC110 Anthropology 3 

3 PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 3 

3 HIS Core Elective 3 



BUS 100 Computing for Business 3 POL 100 American Nat'l Gov't 3 

FA 201 Civilization through Art I 3 FA 202 Civilization through Art II 3 



15 



SOPHOMORE 



SCI 



Core Elective 



3 SCI 



Core Elective 



ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 3 
BUS 205 Macroeconomics 3 

BUS 208 Principles of Management 3 
FREE Elective 3 

15 



ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II 
BUS 206 Microeconomics 
BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 
ENG 112 Speech Communication 



! M. 



JUNIOR 



Literature Core Elective 3 ENG 



Literature Core Elective 



BUS 300 Quantitative Methods I 3 BUS 301 Quantitative Methods II 



15 



3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



BUS 352 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 350 


Money and Banking 


3 


BUS 371 


Business Financial 












Management 


3 


ACC 311 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


BUS 390 


Human Relations 












Management 


3 


ENG 339 


Technical Writing 


3 


FREE Elective 


3 


FREE El 


:ctive 


3 






18 


SENIOR 




ii 


PHL 101 


Contemporary 












Self Images 


3 


PHL 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


BUS 385 


Production & 




BUS 430 


Management Information 






Operations 






Systems 


3 




Management 


3 








BUS 


Advanced Management 




BUS 491 


Seminar in Business Policies 


3 




Elective 


3 








FREE 


Elective (non-major) 


} 


FREE 


Elective 


3 



15 



Total required for graduation: 126 credits 



15 



18 



THE CURRICULA 



Business Administration Major 

Marketing Specialization 



Majors. Specie, zations and 
Certifications 



Division of Business Administration 
Degree: B.S. /Business Administration 
Program Director: Frank Notturno 

Marketing, one of the available business 
specializations, concentrates on exchange 
processes. College Misericordia's 

marketing specialization goes beyond the 
traditional. It prepares students for 
employment in business, as well as non- 
business organizations. Those who are or 
will be involved in managing private or 
public, profit or non-profit organizations 
can benefit from this program. 

Opportunities in the field of marketing 
are expanding rapidly as organizations 
discover the importance of marketing 
techniques to their continued success. 
Today and in the future, not only will 
products be marketed, but services, ideas, 
places, political candidates, health care 
facilities, educational institutions, and 
many more organizations will also benefit 
by using marketing tools. 

Students obtain jobs in a variety of 
organizations, in Advertising, Public 
Relations, Sales, Product and Brand 
Management, Marketing Research, 
Purchasing, Retailing, Wholesaling, and 
many other marketing related positions. 

Minors to be considered with this major 
include Accounting, Computer Science, 
and Management. 

All course work in the major must carry 
a grade of "C" or better. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



FRESHMAN 



MTH 



Math Bank I 



ENG 103 English Composition 
HIS Core Elective 

BUS 100 Computing for Business 
FA 201 Civilization through Art I 



3 SOC110 Anthropology 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 

HIS Core Elective 

POL 100 American Nat'l Gov't 

FA 202 Civilization through Art II 



SOPHOMORE 



SCI Core Elective 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 

BUS 205 Macroeconomics 

BUS 208 Principles of Management 

FREE Elective (non-major) 

FREE Elective 



SCI Core Elective 

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II 

BUS 206 Microeconomics 

BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 

ENG 112 Speech Communication 

FREE Elective (non-major) 



ENG 



JUNIOR 



Literature Core Elective 3 ENG 



Literature Core Elective 



BUS 300 Quantitative Methods I 3 BUS 301 Quantitative Methods II 



3 
3 
3 
3 

is 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
is 



BUS 345 


Consumer Behavior 


3 


BUS 350 


Money and Banking 


3 


BUS 352 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 


Advanced Marketing 




BUS 371 


Business Financial 






Elective 


3 




Management 


3 

is 


ENG 339 
SENIOR 


Technical Writing 


3 
15 


PHL 101 


Contemporary Self Images 


3 


PHL 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


BUS 450 


Marketing Research 


3 


BUS 440 


Marketing Management 


3 


BUS 


Advanced Marketing 












Elective 


3 


BUS 491 


Seminar in Business Policies 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 



15 



Total required for graduation: 126 credits 



15 



THE CURRICULA 



19 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Business Administration 

Management Information Systems Major 



Division of Business Administration 

Degree: B.S./ Management Information Systems 

Program Director: John Kachurick 



The management information systems 
degree constitutes an interdisciplinary 
approach to modern information systems, 
providing strong foundations in business 
and computer science as they relate to 
business information management, 
development, and operations. 



The major provides a melding of the two 
disciplines since the development of a 
computer-based information system is 
not merely a technological exercise as it 
also has managerial, organizational, and 
behavioral implications. The manage- 
ment information systems degree offers a 
strong foundation in computer science, 
business theory and practice, and the 
related role of information flow within an 
organization. 

The management information systems 
degree provides majors a balance of 
theory and practice in both disciplines, 
and prepares students for entry-level 
positions in such fields as systems 
analysis, systems design, and information 
systems management. Students may also 
elect to continue their studies at the 
graduate level. 

All course work in the major must carry 
a grade of "C" or better. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



FRESHMAN 



MTH Math Bank I 

ENG 103 English Composition 

HIS Core Elective 

CPS 101 Programming: PASCAL 

BUS 100 Computing for Business 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



CPS 121 Computer Programming 

PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 

HIS Core Elective 

SOC 110 Anthropology 

POL 100 American Nat'l Gov't 



SOPHOMORE 



BUS 205 
FA 201 
SCI 
CPS 221 



3 
3 
3 

3 

3 
18 



BUS 206 Microeconomics 

FA 202 Civilization Through An II 

SCI Core Elective 

ENG 112 Speech Communication 
ENG 339 Technical Writing 



JUNIOR 



CPS 231 Introduction to File 

Processing 
BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 
BUS 208 Principles of Management 
BUS 300 Quantitative Methods I 
ENG Literature Core Elective 



CPS 431 Software Design & 



CPS 232 Data Structures 

CPS Advanced COBOL 

ACC311 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 301 Quantitative Methods II 

ENG Literature Core Elective 



SENIOR 



BUS 430 Management Information 



Development 
Business Financial 
Management 
BUS 390 Human Relations 

Management 3 

Core Elective 3 

Contemporary Self Images 3 

15 



BUS 371 



RLS 
PHL101 



3 CPS 432 

PHL 
CPS 412 
RLS 



Systems 

Database Management 

Systems Design 
Core Elective 
Computers and Society 
Core Elective 



3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 3 ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II 3 

Macroeconomics 

Civilization Through Art I 

Core Elective 

Introduction to Computer 
Systems 
MTH 151 Calculus I 



3 
3 
3 

3 

3 

18 



3 

3 

3 
3 
3 

is 



3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total required for graduation: 127 credits 



20 



THE CURRICULA 



Child Welfare Services 

Certification 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications ' 



Division of Professional Studies 

Degree: May be taken in support of several degrees 

Program Director: James Calderone 

The child welfare services certificate 
program is most directly associated with a 
major in one of the helping professions. 
Child welfare specialists handle the 
problems of abused, neglected and 
abandoned children or those whose 
behavior has brought them to the attention 
of the courts. This type of work is 
demanding and requires highly trained and 
dedicated professionals for whom children 
and their families are of paramount 
importance. 

A certificate in child welfare services 
involves a total of 15 credits. Three of 
these credits are earned through the 
successful completion of a clinic, field 
practicum or other appropriate placement 
in a setting which serves children's needs 
and relates to the student's major field of 
study. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



PSY 275 Child and Adolescent Psychology 3 

CWS 363 Child Welfare Services 3 

Two (2) additional courses selected from the following: 



CWS 392 


Child Welfare and Neglect 


(3) 


CWS 393 


Child Welfare Law 


(3) 


CWS 395 


Foster, Residential, and Adoptive Care 


(3) 


CWS 333 


Substance Abuse in the Adolescent 






Population 


(3) 


Approved 


Field Practicum 

Total: 15 credits 


3 



THE CURRICl I A 



21 



Computer Science Major 



ors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Computer Science 

Degree: B.S., Computer Science 

Program Director: Sr. Agnes T. Brennan, R.S.M. 



College Misericordia offers students several 
different computer science programs in 
response to a variety of interests and career 
goals. The Computer Science curricula 
follow the recommendations of the 
Association of Computing Machinery and 
uphold the College's long history of 
providing career-oriented educations within 
a strong liberal arts program. 

The Computer Science major leads to a 
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. 
The program prepares students to pursue 
careers in scientific or industrial 
programming and systems analysis, or to 
continue their education at the graduate 
level. 

College Misericordia's computer facilities 
were designed to achieve one primary goal: 
to serve the academic needs of Misericordia 
students. The principal academic computer 
at the College is a Digital Equipment 
Corporation VAX 11/ 750 with VMS/UNIX 
operating systems. The VAX line is one of 
the most widely used computer systems in the 
world. The College's computer facilities also 
include an IBM Personal Computer Lab. The 
academic computing facilities are 
independent of the College's Management 
Information System. 

Computer Science majors must meet the core 
curriculum requirements set by the College, 
as well as the requirements specific to the 
major. Majors must complete an approved 
program of 19 credits of lower division 
Computer Science courses, 18 credits of 
upper division Computer Science electives, 
19 credits of mathematics corequirements 
and 8 credits of physics. In addition, students 
must complete a senior independent project 
in consultation with their advisors. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 
FRESHMAN 



Computer Programming 
Calculus II 
Core Elective 
American Nat'l Gov't 
Introduction to Psychology 



MTH 244 Set Theory & Logic 
PHY 222 General Physics II 
FA 202 Civilization through Art II 
I NG 339 Technical Writing 
CPS 232 Data Structures & 

Algorithmic Analysis 



CPS 101 


Intro to Programming: 








PASCAL 


3 


CPS 121 


Mill 151 


Calculus I 


1 


MTH 15 


HIS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS 


TNG 103 


Composition 


3 


POL 100 


SOC 110 


Anthropology 


3 
15 


PSY 123 






SOPHOMORE 



MTH 225 Calculus III 
PHY 221 General Physics I 
FA 201 Civilization through Art I 
CPS 231 Introduction to File 
Processing 



15 



JUNIOR 



MTH 241 Linear Algebra 
PHI. 101 Contemporary Self Images 3 
ENG Literature Core Elective 3 

CPS 221 Introduction to 

Computer Systems 3 



3 MTH 215 Math Statistics 



PHL 
ENG 



Core Elective 
Literature Core Elective 



CPS 331 



Organization of 
Programming Languages _3 

15 



CPS 222 Computer Organization 
CPS 412 Computers and Society 



CPS 321 



CPS 431 



FREE 
RLS 



Operating Systems & 
Computer Architecture 

Software Design & 
Development 

Electives 

Core Elective 



SENIOR 



CPS 432 

CPS 480 
< PS 121 

I RI I 



3 RLS 

15 



Database Management 
Systems Design 
Independent Study 
Intro to Numerical Analysis 
Elective 
Core Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



[6 

3 
3 
3 

3 

_3 

15 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



Total required for graduation: 121 credits 
Upper division courses are offered in alternate years, so that a student's schedule may not 
follow this sequence exactly. For example, courses that are shown in the senior year may 
be taken in the junior year and vice versa. 



">T 



THE CURRICULA 



Elementary Education Major 

Elementary Education Certification 

Division of Professional Studies 
Degree: B.S. /Elementary Education 
Program Director: Kathleen Nolan 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

The Elementary Education program has been continually refined to 
keep pace with developments in the field of education. The program 
is fully approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and 
leads to a teaching certificate valid in Pennsylvania and transferable 
to many other states. 

All students who wish to major in elementary education must 
successfully complete the liberal arts core curriculum prescribed by 
the College. Additionally, students must successfully complete a 
series of professional studies, speciality area courses, field 
experiences, and student teach for an entire semester. 

All Elementary Education majors must also satisfactorily complete 
field experiences every semester from the second semester of the 
freshman year to the first semester of the senior year. Field 
experience involves course-related observation and practicum 
assignments in community schools. During the final semester 
students successfully complete a 15- week student teaching 
assignment. All field experiences and teaching assignments are 
arranged by the College. Transportation to and from field 
experience and student teaching assignments is the responsibility 
of the student. 



Students who successfully complete the elementary education 
program are eligible for recommendation by the College to the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education for state teacher 
certification. The College's recommendation and the successful 
completion of other requirements established by the state, including 
meeting the scores specified by the state on the state's teachers' test, 
qualify graduates for an "Instructional I" certificate. 

Students who complete the college core, all program requirements 
except student teaching, and who earn a total of at least 120 credits 
may graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Education but will not 
be eligible for Pennsylvania Department of Education Certification. 

Selection, Advancement and Graduation Criteria 

Admission into Pre-Education 

Students admitted to the Pre-Education Program (freshman year) 
must meet the general admission requirements of the College. 
Admission to the Pre-Education Program does not guarantee 
advancement into the Teacher Education Program nor does it allow 
students to take the- professional program methods courses. 

Advancement into the Professional Program 

(Sophmore, Junior and Senior Years) 

Application to the Teacher Education Program is made during the 

spring of a student's freshman year. Screening of applicants will 

occur at the end of the freshman year based upon the following 

criteria: 



23 



THE CURRICULA 



(continued) 



\4ajors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Elementary Education Major A An overa| , GpA of ^ Qr abovg Studems who havg 

MycrtwnCertification between a 2J and 25 may bg admitted conditionally if 

requirements below are met. If conditionally admitted 
students do not reach an overall GPA of 2.5 or above after 
2 more semesters, they will be dismissed from the program. 

B. Successful completion of the Pre-Professional Skills Test 
which is administered to all program applicants. 

C. Satisfactory completion of a freshman field experience. 

D. Recommendation by at least one Teacher Education 
Program faculty member. 

E. Successful completion of an interview conducted by two 
Teacher Education faculty members. 

F. Medical documentation which indicates the absence of any 
mental or physical condition which might eventually 
disqualify the student as an applicant for state certification. 

G. Participation in the Freshman Teacher Education Seminar. 

H. Demonstration of adequate skills in reading, writing, and 

mathematics. 

I. Participation in the College Misericordia Education Club. 

Policy for Transfer Students 

If students wish to transfer into the Elementary Education 
Professional Program from either another college or university 
(external transfer) or from another program within College 
Misericordia (internal transfer), they must have a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.5 or above, and one written or verbal 
recommendation from the school or program from which they are 
transfering for initial consideration into this program. Once the 
above requirements have been met, the students will be conditionalh 
accepted as an Elementary Education major for one semester. 
During this first semester of conditional acceptance, the students 
must also meet the following criteria: 

A. Successful completion of the Pre-Professional Skills 
Test (PPST). 

B. Successful completion of a formal interv iew by the 
Teacher Education faculty. 

C. Compliance with the regulations listed in the 
"Retention in the Program" section of program 
criteria. 



24 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

Elementary Education Major If the students meet all of these requirements after the 

Elementary Education Certification completion of their first semester in the program, they will be 

(continued) unconditionally accepted into the program. These students must 

continue to comply with the "Retention in the Program" criteria and 
other requirements listed in this catalog. If the students do not meet 
all of these requirements after the completion of their first semester 
in the program, they will be dismissed from the Teacher Education 
program. 

Retention in the Program 

Retention in the program is based upon the following criteria: 

A. An overall GPA of 2.5 or better. Students who fall below 
a 2.5 will be placed on program probation for one semester. 
At the end of the program probation semester, their GPA 
must be at least 2.5 or they will be dismissed from the 
program. 

B. Successful completion of a field experience each semester. 
Failure to do so will result in program probation for one 
semester. A second failure in a field experience will result 
in dismissal from the program. 

C. Compliance with the Teacher Education Program Code of 
Ethics (see Teacher Education Program Handbook for 
details), and with the Academic Integrity Policy of College 
Misericordia (see Student Handbook). Violations of either 
policy will result in program dismissal. 

D. Successful completion of the content area standardized tests. 

E. Completion of all courses required at each level before 
proceeding to the next level. 

F. Demonstrated participation in the College Misericordia 
Education Club. 

G. Medical documentation which indicates the absence of any 
mental or physical condition which might eventually 
disqualify a student as an applicant for state certification. 

Student Teaching Requirements 

Qualification for student teaching placements is based upon the 
following criteria. 

A. A GPA of 2.5 or better. 

B. Successful completion of a series of required field 
experiences. 



25 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Elementary Education Major C. Recommendation by the Teacher Education faculty. 

Elementary Education Certification 

(cont.) D. Successful completion of all courses required by the 

program. 

E. Submitted documentation which indicates the absence of 
any mental or physical condition which might disqualify 
them as applicants for state certification. 

F. Felony and child abuse clearance. 

Graduation Requirements for Teacher Education Programs 

Students must meet all of the graduation requirements set 
by the College and by the Teacher Education program in which they 
are enrolled. 

Certification Requirements 

A. Students must submit an application for certification to the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education. 

B. Students must meet all requirements set by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. Pennsylvania requires teacher 
certification candidates to successfully complete the 
Pennsylvania Teacher Competency Testing Program 
(PTCTP). 

C. Students who desire out-of-state certifications must contact 
that state's Department of Education for information. 



26 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Elementary Education Major 

Elementary Education Certification 
(cont.) 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



FRESHMAN 



EDU 101 Education Seminar 





SED100 


Exceptional Children 


3 


ENG 112 Speech 


3 


EDU 601 


Field 1 





ENG 103 Composition 


3 


SOC110 


Anthropology 


3 


HIS 103 American History I 


3 


HIS 104 


American History II 


3 


MTH 090 Mathematics I 


3 


POL 100 


American Nat'l Gov't 


3 


PSY 123 Introduction to 




PSY 275 


Child & Adolescent 




Psychology 


3 
15 




Psychology 


3 
15 




SOPHOMORE 







EDU 200 Educational Psychology 3 
EDU 220 Basic Methods" 1.5 

EDU 222 Language Arts Methods' '1.5 



EDU 369 Children's Literature 

EDU 602 Field 2 

BIO 103 General Biology I & Lab 

FA 201 Civilization through Art I 

PHY 131 Physical Science and Lab 



EDU 221 Science Methods" 1.5 

EDU 223 Social Studies Methods" 1.5 

EDU 224 Health Methods " 3 

EDU 323 Communication Disorders 3 

EDU 603 Field 3 

BIO 104 General Biology II & Lab 3 

FA 202 Civilization through Art II 3 

ENG 318 Study of Language 3 

18 



JUNIOR 



EDU 320 Reading Methods I" 

EDU 100 Educational Foundations 

EDU 604 Field 4 

GEO 201 Earth Science 

ENG 247 American Literature I 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 



3 EDU 321 Reading Methods II" 3 

3 EDU 322 Math Methods" 3 

EDU 605 Field 5 

3 GEO 202 Cultural World Geography 3 

3 ENG 248 American Literaturell 3 

3 MTH 115 Statistics 3 

RLS Core Elective 3 

15 18 



EDU 325 Art Methods 

EDU 326 Music Methods 

EDU 327 School Law 

EDU 260 Classroom Management 

EDU 380 Senior Seminar 

EDU 606 Field 6 

RLS Core Elective 

PHL Core Elective 

FREE Elective 



SENIOR 




1 EDU 400 Parents 


3 


1 EDU 495 Student Teaching 


9 


1 EDU 499 Seminar 





3 














3 




3 




3 

is 


12 



Total required for graduation: 126 credits 
"Requires concurrent field experiences 



27 



THE CURRICULA 



Elementar\ Education Major 

Elementary and Early Childhood 
Education Certifications 



Division of Professional Studies 
Degree: B. S.,, Elementary Education 
Program Director: Kathleen Nolan 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

College Misericordia's Early Childhood Education program is 
designed to prepare teachers to work with preschool children, either 
as teachers or as operators of private preschool/nursery centers. 
The program builds upon the College's elementary education 
program. 

All students who wish to major in elementary education with a 
certification in early childhood education must successfully 
complete the liberal arts core curriculum prescribed by the College. 
Additionally, students must successfully complete a series of 
professional studies courses, speciality area courses, field 
experiences, and student teach for an entire semester. 

Early Childhood and Elementary Education students must also 
satisfactorily complete field experiences every semester from the 
second semester of the freshman year to the senior year. Field 
experience involves course-related observation and practicum 
assignments in community schools. All field experiences and 
student teaching assignments are arranged by the College. During 
the final semester students must successfully complete a 15 week 
student teaching assignmnent. Transportation to and from field 
experience and student teaching assignments is the responsibility 
of the student. 



Students who successfully complete the Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education programs are eligible for recommendation 
by the College to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for 
two state teacher certifications, one in elementary education and 
one in early childhood education. The College's recommendation 
and the successful completion of other requirements established by 
the state, including meeting the scores specified by the state on the 
state's teachers' test, qualify graduates for "Instructional I" 
certificates in both areas. 

Selection, Advancement and Graduation Criteria 

Admission into Pre-Education 

Students admitted to the Pre-Education Program (freshman year) 
must meet the general admission requirements of the College. 
Admission to the Pre-Education Program does not guarantee 
advancement into the Teacher Education Program nor does it allow 
students to take professional program methods courses. 

Advancement into the Professional Program 

(Sophmore, Junior and Senior Years) 

Application to the Teacher Fducation Program is made during the 

spring of a student's freshman year. Screening of applicants will 

occur at the end of the freshman year based upon the following 

criteria: 



28 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Elementary Education Major A An overall GPA of 2.5 or above. Students who have between 

Elementary and Early Childhood a 2.3 an d 2.5 may be admitted conditionally if requirements 

Education Certification (cont.) below are met If conc jitionally admitted students do not 

reach an overall GPA of 2.5 or above after two more 
semesters, they will be dismissed from the program. 

B. Successful completion of the Pre-Professional Skills Test 
which is administered to all program applicants. 

C. Satisfactory completion of a freshman field experience. 

D. Recommendation by at least one Teacher Education 
Program faculty member. 

E. Successful completion of an interview conducted by two 
Teacher Education faculty members. 

F. Medical documentation which indicates the absence of any 
mental or physical condition which might eventually 
disqualify the student as an applicant for state certification. 

G. Participation in the Freshman Teacher Education Seminar. 

H. Demonstration of adequate skills in reading, writing and 

mathematics. 

I. Participation in the College Misericordia Education Club. 

Policy for Transfer Students 

If students wish to transfer into the Elementary Education 
Professional Program (with Early Childhood Certification) from 
either another college or university (external transfer) or from 
another program within College Misericordia (internal transfer), 
they must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or above, 
and one written or verbal recommendation from the school or 
program from which they are transfering for initial consideration 
into this program. Once the above requirements have been met, 
the students will be conditionally accepted as an Elementary 
Education major (with Early Childhood Certification) for one 
semester. During this first semester of conditional acceptance, the 
students must also meet the following criteria: 

A. Successful completion of the Pre-Professional 
Skills Test (PPST). 

B. Successful completion of a formal interview by the 
Teacher Education faculty. 



29 



THE CURRICULA 



Elemenlary Education Major 
Elementary and Early Childhood 
ucation Certification (cont.) 



Majors. Specializations and 
< rtifications 

C. Compliance with the regulations listed in the 

"Retention in the Program" section of program 
criteria. 

[f the students meet all of these requirements after the completion 
of their first semester in the program, they will be unconditional!) 
accepted into the program. These students must continue to comply 
with the "Retention in the Program" criteria and other requirements 
listed in this catalog. If the students do not meet all of these 
requirements after the completion of their first semester in the 
program, they will be dismissed from the Teacher Education 
Program. 

Retention in the Program 

Retention in the program is based upon the following criteria: 

A. An overall GPA of 2.5 or better. Students who fall below 
a 2.5 will be placed on program probation for one semester. 
At the end of the program probation semester their GPA 
must be at least 2.5 or they will be dismissed from the 
program. 

B. Successful completion of a field experience each semester. 
Failure to do so will result in program probation for one 
semester. A second failure in a field experience will result 
in dismissal from the program. 

C. Compliance with the Teacher Education Program Code of 
Ethics (see Teacher Education Program Handbook for 
details), and with the Academic Integrity Policy of College 
Misericordia (see Student Handbook). Violations of either 
policy will result in program dismissal. 

D. Successful completion of the content area standardized tests. 

E. Completion of all courses required at each level before 
proceeding to the next level. 

F. Demonstrated participation in the College Misericordia 
Education Club. 



Medical documentation which indicates the absence of any 
mental or physical condition which might eventually 
disqualify a student as an applicant for state certification. 



30 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Elementary Education Major Student Teaching Requirements 

Elementary and Early Childhood 

Education Certification ( C ont.) Qualification for student teaching placements is based upon the 

following criteria: 

A. A GPA of 2.5 or better. 

B. Successful completion of a series of required field 
experiences. 

C. Recommendation by the Teacher Education faculty. 

D. Successful completion of all courses required by the 
program. 

E. Submitted documentation which indicates the absence of 
any mental or physical condition which might disqualify 
them as applicants for state certification. 

F. Felony and child abuse clearance. 

Graduation Requirements for Teacher Education Programs 

Students must meet all of the graduation requirements set 
by the College, and by the Teacher Education Program in which they 
are enrolled. 

Certification Requirements 

A. Students must submit an application for certification to the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education. 

B. Students must meet all requirements set by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. Pennsylvania requires teacher 
certification candidates to successfully complete the 
Pennsylvania Teacher Competency Testing Program 
(PTCTP). 

C. Students who desire out-of-state certifications must contact 
that state's Department of Education for information. 



THE CURRICULA 



31 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



EIementar\ Education Major 

Elementary and Early Childhood 
Education Certification (cont.) 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 
FRESHMAN 



EDU 101 Education Seminar 

ENG 112 Speech Communications 

ENG 103 Composition 

HIS 103 American History I 

MTH 090 Mathematics I 

PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 3 






SED 100 


Exceptional Children 


3 


3 


EDU 601 


Field 1 





3 


Soc 110 


Anthropology 


3 


3 


HIS 104 


American History II 


3 


3 


POL 100 


American Nat*l Gov't 


3 


'gy 3 


PSY 275 


Child & Adolescent 








Psychology 


3 


15 






15 


SOPHOMORE 







EDU 200 Educational Psychology 3 
EDU 220 Basic Methods" 1.5 

EDU 222 Language Arts Methods"1.5 



EDU 369 Children's Literature 
EDU 602 Field 2 

BIO 103 General Biology I & Lab 
FA 201 Civilization through Art I 
PHY 131 Physical Science and Lab 



EDU 221 Science Methods" 
EDU 223 Social Studies Methods" 
EDU 224 Health Methods" 
EDU 323 Communication Disorders 
EDU 603 Field 3 

BIO 104 General Biology II & Lab 
FA 202 Civilization through Art II 
ENG 318 Study of Language 



JUNIOR 



EDU 320 Reading Methods I" 
EDU 100 Educational Foundations 
EDU 604 Field 4 
GEO 201 Earth Science 
ENG 247 American Literature I 
PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 
EDU 362 Early Childhood 
Curriculum" 



EDU 325 Art Methods 1 

EDU 326 Music Methods 1 

EDU 327 School Law 1 

EDU 260 Classroom Management 3 

EDU 606 Field 6 

RLS Core Elective 3 

EDU 380 Senior Seminar 

MTH 115 Statistics 3 

PHL Core Elective 3 

15 



EDU 400 Parents 

EDU 495 Student Teaching 

EDU 499 Seminar 



1 5 

15 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

> 



3 


EDU 321 Reading Methods II" 


3 


3 


EDL 322 Math Methods" 


3 





EDU 605 Field 5 





3 


GEO 202 Cultural World Geography 


3 


3 


ENG 248 American Literature II 


3 


3 


EDU 363 Early Childhood Methods" 


3 


3 
8 


RLS Core Elective 


3 

ii 


SENIOR 





12 



Total required for graduation: 129 credits 
"Require concurrent field experiences 



32 



THE CURRICULA 



Special Education Major 

Special Education Certification 

Division of Professional Studies 

Degree: B.S. /Education 

Program Director: Kathleen Nolan 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

College Misericordia's major program in special education trains 
teachers to work with individuals who are mentally retarded, 
learning disabled, emotionally disturbed, physically handicapped, 
and multihandicapped between the ages of 3 and 21. The special 
education program is fully approved by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education and leads to a valid teaching certificate 
honored in Pennsylvania and many other states. 

All students who wish to major in special education must follow the 
core curriculum prescribed by College Misericordia. Additionally, 
students must complete a series of professional studies, speciality 
area courses, field experiences, and student teach for an entire 
semester. 

All special education majors must satisfactorily complete a field 
experience every semester from the second semester of the freshman 
year to the first semester of the senior year. Field experiences involve 
course-related observation and practicum assignments in community 
schools. During one semester of the senior year students must 
complete a 15- week student teaching assignment. All field 
experiences and student teaching assignments are arranged by the 
College. Transportation to and from field experience is the student's 
responsibility. 

Students who successfully complete the special education program 
are eligible for recommendation by the College to the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education for state teacher certification. The 
College's recommendation and the successful completion of other 
requirements established by the state, including meeting the scores 
specified by the state on the state's teachers' test, qualify program 
graduates for an "Instructional I" certificate which is needed to teach 
mentally retarded, learning disabled, socially and emotionally 
disturbed, physically handicapped, and multihandicapped children 
in the public schools of Pennsylvania and in most other states. 

Students who complete the college core, all program requirements 
except student teaching, and who earn a total of at least 120 credits 
may graduate with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Special Education 
but will not be eligible for Pennsylvania Department of Education 
Certification. 

Selection, Advancement and Graduation Criteria 

Admission into Pre-Education 



Students admitted to the Pre-Education Program (freshman year) 
must meet the general admission requirements of the College. 
Admission to the Pre-Education Program does not guarantee 
advancement into the Teacher Education Program nor does it allow 
students to take the professional program specialty courses. 



J 3 



THK Cl'RRK'l 1 \ 



Special Education Major 

Special Education Certification 
(cont.) 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Advancement into the Professional Program (Sophomore. Junior and 
Senior Years) 

Application to the Teacher Education Program is made during the 
spring of a student's freshman year. Screening of applicants will 
occur at the end of the freshman year based upon the following 
criteria: 

A. An overall GPA of 2.5 or above. Students who have between 
a 2.3 and 2.5 GPA may be admitted conditionally if 
requirements below are met. If conditionally admitted 
students do not reach an overall GPA of 2.5 after two more 
semesters, they will be dismissed from the program. 

B. Successful completion of the Pre-professional Skills Test 
which is administered to all program applicants. 

C. Satisfactory completion of a freshman field experience. 

D. Recommendation by at least one Teacher Education 
Program faculty member. 

E. Successful completion of an interview conducted by two 
Teacher Education faculty members. 

F. Medical documentation which indicates the absence of any 
mental or physical condition which might eventually 
disqualify the student as an applicant for state certification. 

G. Participation in the Freshman Teacher Education Seminar. 

H. Demonstration of adequate skills in reading, writing, and 

mathematics. 



I. 



Participation in the College Misericordia Education Club. 



Policy for Transfer Students 

If students wish to transfer into the Special Education Professional 
Program from either another college or university (external 
transfer) or from another program within College Misericordia 
(internal transfer), they must have a cumulative grade point average 
of 2.5 or above, and one written or verbal recommendation from 
the school or program from which they are transfering for initial 
consideration into this program. Once the above requirements have 
been met, the students will be conditionally accepted as a Special 
Education major for one semester. During this first semester of 
conditional acceptance, the students must also meet the following 
criteria: 



34 



(cont.) 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

Special Education Major A - Successful completion of the Pre-Professional Skills 

Special Education Certification Test (PPST); 



B. Successful completion of a formal interview by the 
Teacher Education faculty; 

C. Compliance with the regulations listed in the 
"Retention in the Program 11 section of program 
criteria. 

If the students meet all of these requirements after the completion 
of their first semester in the program, they will be unconditionally 
accepted into the program. These students must continue to comply 
with the "Retention in the Program 11 criteria and other requirements 
listed in this catalog. If the students do not meet all of these 
requirements after the completion of their first semester in the 
program, they will be dismissed from the Teacher Education 
program. 

Retention in the Program 

Retention in the program is based upon the following criteria: 

A. An overall GPA of 2.5 or better. Students who fall below a 
2.5 will be placed on program probation for one semester. At 
the end of the program probation their GPA must be at least 
2.5 or they will be dismissed from the program. 

B. Successful completion of a field experience each semester. 
Failure to do so will result in program probation for one 
semester. A second failure in a field experience will result in 
dismissal from the program. 

C. Compliance with the Teacher Education Program Code of 
Ethics (See Teacher Education Program Handbook for 
details) and with the Academic Integrity Policy of College 
Misericordia (see Student Handbook). Violations of either 
policy will result in program dismissal. 

D. Successful completion of the content area standardized 
exams. 

E. Completion of all courses required at each level before 
proceeding to the next level. 

F. Demonstrated participation in the College Misericordia 
Education Club or the College Misericordia Council for 
Exceptional Children. 



15 



THE (TRRICl I A 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Special Education Major G. Medical documentation which indicates the absence of any 

Special Education Certification mental or physical condition which might eventually 

( cont \ disqualify the student as an applicant for state certification. 

Student Teaching Requirements 

Qualification for student teaching placements is based upon the 
following criteria: 

A. A GPA of 2.5 or better. 

B. Successful completion of a series of required field 
experiences. 

C. Recommendation by the Teacher Education faculty. 

D. Successful completion of all courses required by the 
program. 

E. Submitted documentation which indicates the absence of 
any mental or physical condition which might disqualify 
them as applicants for state certification. 

F. Felony and child abuse clearance. 

Graduation Requirements for Teacher Education Programs 

Students must meet all of the graduation requirements set by the 
College and by the Teacher Education Program in which they are 
enrolled. 

Certification Requirements 

A. Students must submit an application for certification to the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education. 

B. Students must meet all requirements set by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. Pennsylvania requires teacher 
certification candidates to successfully complete the 
Pennsylvania Teacher Competency Test Program (PTCTP). 

C. Students who desire out-of-state certifications must 
contact that state's Department of Education for 
information. 



2L. 



THE CURRICULA 



Special Education Major 

Special Education Certification 
(cont.) 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 

FRESHMAN 



EDU 101 Education Seminar 
POL 100 American Nat'l Gov't 
ENG 103 Composition 
HIS 103 American History 1 
MTH 090 Mathematics I 
PSY 123 Introduction to 
Psychology 



SED 200 Policies and Procedures 
SED 244 Characteristics of 
Handicapped I* 
SED 210 Motor Development 
EDU 369 Children's Literature 



3 
3 
3 

3 

3 
15 



SED 100 Exceptional Children 
SED 601 Field 1 
Soc 110 Anthropology 
HIS 104 American History II 
ENG 112 Speech Communication 
PSY 275 Child & Adolescent 
Psychology 



EDU 602 Field 2 



SOPHOMORE 

3 EDU 200 Educational Psychology 

3 SED 245 Strategies MPH I ' 

3 EDU 322 Math Methods' 

3 EDU 100 Educational Foundations 

EDU 603 Field 3 



BIO 103 General Biology I & Lab 3 BIO 104 General Biology II & Lab 
FA 201 Civilization through Art I 3 FA 202 Civilization through An II 

18 



3 

3 
3 
3 

3 
15 



is 







JUNIOR 






SED 344 


Characteristics of 




SED 343 


Diagnosis of Learning 






Handicapped II* 


3 




Problems 


3 


EDU 320 


Reading Methods I* 


3 


EDU 345 


Strategies MPH II* 


3 


EDU 604 


Field 4 





EDU 605 


Field 5 





ENG 247 


American Literature I 


3 


ENG 248 


American Literature II 


1 


MTH 115 Statistics 


3 


EDU 323 


Communication Disorders 


3 


PHL 101 


Contemporary 




RLS 


Core Elective 


3 




Self Images 


3 
15 


PHL 


Core Elective 


3 

is 






SENIOR 






SED 372 


Vocational Habilitation" 


3 


SED 400 


Parents 


3 


SED 375 


Issues in Special liducation 3 


SED 495 


Student Teaching 


9 


EDU 606 


Field 6 





SED 497 


Seminar 





SED 260 


Classroom Management 


3 








EDU 380 


Senior Seminar 











RLS 


Core Elective 


3 








FREE 


Elective 


3 

15 






12 



Total required for graduation: 126 credits 
•Requires concurrent field experiences 



THE CI RRICT I A 



37 



English Major 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Division of Humanities 
Degree: B. A. English 
Program Director: Ruth Kelly, R.S.M. 

The major in English assists students in 
acquiring a comprehensive knowledge of 
the English language and the literature 
produced in that language from the 
Anglo-Saxon times to the present. 

The English curriculum emphasizes 
student progress from practice in writing 
to mastery of the technique of rhetoric. 
The program's goal is two-fold: the 
articulation of ideas, based on trained 
critical judgment and expressed in clear 
prose; and the understanding of literary 
forms, centered particularly in the 
literature of Great Britain and America. 

English majors must fulfill the College's 
Core Curriculum in addition to 
completing 30 credits in English. 

Students who major in English or minor 
in Writing must participate in The 
Literary Club and in school publications. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



FRESHMAN 



I Mi 103 Composition 

ENG 221 Major British Writers I 

HIS Core Elective 

SOC 110 Anthropology 

M 1 1 1 Math Bank I 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

is 



ENG 105 Research Paper 

ENG 222 Major British Writers II 

HIS Core Elective 

ENG 112 Speech Communication 

MTH Math Bank II 



SOPHOMORE 



FA 201 Civilization through Art I 3 
SCI Core Elective 3 

PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 3 
ENG 203 Advanced Expository 

Writing 3 

ENG 266 Western World Literature 13 

15 



3 
3 

3 

3 
15 



FA 202 Civilization through Art II 3 
SCI Core Elective 3 

FREE Elective*(History or Pre-Law)3 



POL 100 American Nat'l Gov't 3 

ENG 267 Western World Literature II 3 

15 

JUNIOR 



ENG 247 American Literature I 
ENG 350 Medieval Renaissance 

Literature 3 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 3 
FREE Elective* 3 

FREE Elective* 3 

FREE Elective* 3 

18 



3 ENG 248 American Literature II 



ENG 318 Language Studies 
PHL Core Elective 

FREE Elective* 
FREE Elective* 
FREE Elective* 



3 

3 
3 

3 
3 

is 



SENIOR 



ENG 352 19th Century Literature 

FREE Elective* 

PHL 260 Practical Logic 

RLS Core Elective 

HIS Advanced History 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



ENG 353 20th Century Literature 

FREE Elective* 

I \< i 415 Selected Studies 

RLS Core Elective 

HIS Advanced History 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total required for graduation: 126 credits 
* Free electives: e.g. writing, history, pre-law, internship. 



38 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

General Studies Major The general studies program at College Misericordia was created 

to provide the opportunity for students who have previous 
Degree: B.S. or B. A. /General Studies college credits in career oriented programs to earn a Bachelor's 
Program Director: Donald Fries Degree through additional study at College Misericordia. 

Professional course credits completed in prior study can be 
combined with additional credits and will qualify the candidate 
for the Bachelor's Degree. The degree obtained may be a 
Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Arts, each with a major in 
general studies, depending on the courses completed at College 
Misericordia. The degree may be earned by attending day and 
evening classes or through the McAuley Weekend College for 
adults. 



Individual programs of study are designed by the student with 
the assistance of the program director. 

At least 30 credits must be enrned in upper level courses. In 
addition, at least 30 credits must be earned at College 
Misericordia. These two requirements may be satisfied by the 
same 30 credits. Completion of the core curriculum is required 
either directly or by reasonable substitute as prescribed by the 
Registrar in the course of transcript selection. Continuation as 
a general studies major requires a 2.0 average. 

Total required for graduation: 120 credits 



59 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Gerontology 
Certification 

Division of Professional Studies 
Program Director: Dennis Fisher 

Gerontology is the study of aging, a 
normal process in the human lifespan. 
The rapid development and expansion of 
programs and services for elderly persons 
in America, and the anticipated increase 
in the number of persons living to old age, 
have escalated the demand for 
professionals trained to work in the field 
of aging. 

The Gerontology program prepares 
graduates for positions in agencies and 
institutions which administer health and 
community-based services for the aged. 
Career opportunities exist in nursing 
homes, hospitals, senior citizen centers, 
area agencies on aging, nutrition 
programs, rehabilitation centers, social 
welfare agencies and other organizations. 
The program also enhances the knowledge 
and skills of individuals currently 
involved in the provision of such services. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



GER 241 Introduction to Social Gerontology 
GER 375 Aging Policies and Programs 

Select three (3) courses from the following: 



GER 276 


Psychology of Aging (3) 


GER 292 


Older Women (3) 


GER 304 


Nutrition and Aging (3) 


GER 306 


Health and Physiology of Aging(3) 


GER 341 


Substance Abuse and the Aged (3) 


GER 358 


Counseling the Older Adult (3) 


GER 392 


Seminar (3) 


GER 410 


Adult Protective Services (3) 


GER 470 


Practicum (3) 


GER413 


Gerontology Co-operative 




Education (3) 


GER 480 


Independent Study (3) 



TOTAL: 15 credits 



The Gerontology certificate program is 
also offered to students who are not 
pursuing a degree at College Misericordia. 
These individuals may take the 
Gerontology course of study by itself, or 
in conjunction with other continuing 
education courses. 



In addition, College Misericordia also 
offers a minor and a specialization in 
Gerontology for students pursuing related 
courses of study at the College. A 
minimum of 15 credits is necessary to 
complete requirements for a gerontology 
certificate, specialization, or minor. 



411 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

History Major Following a major course of study in history provides a student with 

a strong liberal arts background. The study of history can broaden a 
Division of Humanities student's perspective of local, national and international issues. It 

Degree: B. A. /History fosters an understanding of the complexity of human motivation and 

Program Director: Donald Fries action and provides a critical approach to looking at the past. College 

Misericordia's history program cultivates the ability to think, write and 
speak clearly and precisely with thoroughness and independence. The 
program is for intellectual growth. 

History majors must fulfill the College's core curriculum requirements 
in addition to completing 36 credits in history. Advanced history 
courses require six credits of core history courses as prerequisites. 

Pre-Law Specialization 

The pre-law specialization at College Misericordia was developed in 
accordance with the Association of American Law Schools which 
recommends that prospective law students have a broad liberal arts 
background. The program represents sound preparation for the Law 
School Admission Test and the study of law. 

The program has been carefully designed to develop ability in 
expression and comprehension of English, to afford basic information 
about human institutions and values, and to cultivate the ability to think 
creatively and critically with thoroughness and independence. 

Students may choose to major in English, History or Liberal Studies. 
Upon satisfactory completion of the pre-law specialization, the student 
may receive a Bachelor of Arts degree in English, History or Liberal 
Studies. 

Pre-law students must register with the Program Director's office 
where advice on course selection and information concerning the Law 
School Admission Test (LSAT) and law schools can be obtained. 

General Requirements: 

Incoming Freshman seeking admission to the college as history majors 
must meet the general and specific admissions requirements of the 
college as stated in this catalog. In those cases where the student does 
not fully meet the college admissions requirements, a personal 
interview will be required. 

Continuation as a history major requires that the student maintain a 
minimum of a 2.0 or "C" average in the major and a similar total grade 
point average. A student on Academic Probation for two consecutive 
semesters will be dismissed from the major. 

At the end of the Sophomore year, each student's performance will be 
evaluated by a Sophomore Review Board composed of members of the 
history-government faculty. Students who do not meet the minimum 
requirements may be asked to withdraw from the major. 



THE CURRICULA 



41 



History Major 

Division of Humanities 

Degree: B. A. /History 

Program Director: Donald Fries 



Vfajors, Specitilizatiuns and 

Certifications 

Transfer students must complete all the history requirements as listed 
in the sequence of courses in the college catalog. 

Internship: 

Internships for history majors are assigned on the basis of availability. 
Pre-Law Internships are required as a part of the Pre-Law 
Specialization. Majors who desire to pursue Internships must receive 
prior approval of the Division Chair or work out the details with the 
Pre-Law Advisor. Internships may only be taken if the student has 
a "B" average in the major and Pre-Law Specialization and is a fully 
accredited junior or senior. 

Recommendations: 

To receive a recommendation for graduate study, the student must 
maintain the minimum of a "B" in the major, Pre-Law Specialization 
and total grade point average. 

SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 







FTIE.SHMAN 






ENG 112 


Speech Communication 


3 


POL 100 


American Nat'l Gov't 


3 


HIS 101 


Western Civilization I 


3 


HIS 102 


Western Civilization II 


3 


SOC 110 


Anthropology 


3 


PSY 123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


MTU 


Math Bank I 


3 


MTH 


Math Bank II 


3 


ENG 103 


Composition 


3 
15 


GEO 202 


Cultural World Geography 


3 
15 




SOPHOMORE 






FA 201 


Civilization through Art I 


3 


FA 202 


Civilization through Art II 


3 


SCI 


Core Elective 


3 


SCI 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS/POL 


. Advanced Elective 


3 


HIS 310 


History of England 


3 


HIS 103 


U.S. History Survey I 


3 


HIS 104 


U.S. History Survey II 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


2 

15 


FREE 


Elective 


3 
15 






JUNIOR 






HIS 305 


Recent American/ 












Domestic 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


I \(, 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


POL 


Elective 


3 


PHL 101 


Contemporary Self Images 3 


HIS 390 


Jr. Research Seminar 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


HIS 311 


History of Britain 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


HIS/POL Advanced Elective 


3 


PHL 


Core Elective 


3 






18 






18 






SENIOR 






RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS 


Advanced Elective 


3 


HIS 


Advanced Elective 


3 


ENG 


Advanced Elective 


3 


1 \(. 


Advanced Elective 


3 


1 Rl 1 


Elective 


3 


soc::i 


Cultural Minorities 


3 


IRI 1 


Elective 


3 
15 


FREE 


Elective 


3 
15 



Total required for graduation: 126 credits 



42 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



Liberal Studies Major 



Division of Humanities 

Degree: B.A. or B.S. /Liberal Studies 

Program Director: Louis Maganzin 

Students who pursue a major in liberal studies 
may receive a Bachelor of Arts degree or a 
Bachelor of Science degree, depending on the 
selected area or theme of study. In either case, 
students must complete 120 credits. 

The liberal studies major permits students to 
plan their studies around personal or pro- 
fessional goals. The program enables students 
to create their own "program" by selecting 
courses in general areas of interest such as: 
social science, natural science or humanities, 
or by pursuing a specific theme of study 
designed by the student with an advisor. Some 
themes designed previously are: communi- 
cations, public relations, environmental 
science, writing, gerontology, personnel, and 
women's studies. The modes of study in the 
liberal studies program may be non- 
traditional or traditional. 

Liberal studies majors work closely with an 
advisor throughout the design and 
implementation of their programs. The 
program should exhibit an appropriate 
balance between introductory and advanced 
courses. 

Students will receive a broad liberal arts 
education while focusing their study on social 
science, humanities, general science, or a self- 
designed theme. They are further broadened 
by taking one minor drawn from the above or 
from other areas of study. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



FRESHMAN 



ENG 103 
SOC 110 
Mill 
HIS 
SCI 


Composition 
Anthropology 
Math Bank I 
Core Elective 
Core Elective 




3 
3 
3 
3 

_^ 
15 


POL 100 
PSY 123 
MTH 
HIS 
SCI 


American Nat'l Gov't 
Intro to Psychology 
Math Bank II 
Core Elective 
Core Elective 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 








SOPHOMORE 






FA 201 
PHL 101 
RLS 
ENG 
MAJOR 


Civilization through Art I 3 
Contemporary Self Images 3 
Core Elective 3 
Literature Core Elective 3 
Specialization 3 
15 


FA 202 

PHL 

RLS 

ENG 

MAJOR 


Civilization through Art II 
Core Elective 
Core Elective 
Literature Core Elective 
Specialization 


3 
3 
3 
3 
J 
15 








JUNIOR 






MAJOR 
MINOR 
FREE 


Specialization 
Electives 




6 
3 
6 

15 


MAJOR 
MINOR 
FREE 


Specialization 
Elective 


6 
6 
3 

15 








SENIOR 







MAJOR Specialization 

MINOR 

FREE Electives 



6 MAJOR Specialization 

3 MINOR 

6 FREE Electives 
15 



Total required for graduation: 120 credits 



6 

3 

6 

15 



Thus the liberal studies student has a 30- 
credit major focus, a minimum 15-credit 
minor focus, 54 credits of liberal arts core and 
21 credits of free electives for a total 120 
credits to graduate. Core courses cannot be 
applied to the major focus if they are used for 
core requirements. 



Continuation as a Liberal Studies major 
requires a 2.0 average. 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Mathematics Major 



Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and 

Computer Science 

Degree: B.S. or B. A. /Mathematics 

Program Director: Sr. Agnes T. Brennan, R.S.M. 



Mathematics has been called the "queen 
of the sciences." In recent years, the 
increased use of statistics and quantitative 
methods, and the computer revolution, 
have caused mathematics to pervade not 
only the physical sciences, but the life and 
social sciences as well. Mathematical 
techniques are widely used in research, in 
industry, manufacturing, commerce and 
government. Recognizing these broad 
applications, College Misericordia 
designed its major program in 
mathematics to expose students to both 
classical and contemporary areas. 



The mathematics major prepares students 
for careers in business, industry or 
government, or for future study in 
graduate or professional school. 

Students may choose to pursue either a 
B.S. or B.A. degree in mathematics. The 
required mathematics courses for either 
degree are the same. Students who choose 
a B.A. must complete PHY 221-222; those 
choosing a B.S. must complete PHY 22 1 - 
222 and either CHM 133-134 or BIO 101- 
102. All students must complete CPS 101 
and CPS 121. 

Students must fulfill the core curriculum 
requirements of the College in addition to 
the minimum of 40 credits of approved 
mathematics courses including a senior 
independent project in consultation with 
their advisor. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 

FRESHMAN 



CPS 101 Intro to Programming: 

PASCAL 
MTH 151 Calculus I 
HIS Core Elective 

EN'G 103 Composition 
SOC 110 Anthropology 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



CPS 121 Computer Programming 

MTH 152 Calculus II 

HIS Core Elective 

POL 100 American Nat'! Gov't 

PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 



SOPHOMORE 



MTH 225 Calculus III 4 

PHY 221 General Physics I 4 

FA 201 Civilization through Art I 3 

SCI Elective or FREE Elective'4 

1~5 



MTH 244 Set Theory & Logic 

PHY 222 General Physics II 

FA 202 Civilization through Art II 

I NG 339 Technical Writing 

SCI Elective or FREE Elective' 



JUNIOR 



MTH 241 Linear Algebra 3 

MTH 363 Abstract Algebra I 3 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 3 
ENG Literature Core Elective 3 

FREE Elective .3 

15 



MTH 215 Math Statistics 
MTU 364 Abstract Algebra II 
PHL Core Elective 

ENG Literature Core Elective 

FREE Elective 



MTH 341 Principles of Analysis I 

FREE Electives 

RLS Core Elective 

.MTH Elective 



SENIOR 

3 MTH 342 Principles of Analysis II 
6 MTH 480 Independent Study 
3 RLS Core Elective 

3 MTH Elective 
FREE Elective 
15 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



3 

4 

3 

3 

4 

17 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
L5 



3 

3 
3 
3 
J 
13 



Total required for graduation: 120 credits 



•Either BIO 101-102 or CHM 133-134 for B.S. Degree 

Upper division courses are offered in alternate years, so that a student's schedule may 
not follow this sequence exactly. For example, courses that are shown in the senior \cjr 
may be taken in the junior year and vice versa. 



4-1 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



Mathematics/Computer Science 
Combined Major 



Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and 
Computer Science. 

Degree: B.S. /Mathematics and Computer Science 
Program Director: Sr. Agnes T. Brennan, R.S.M. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



College Misericordia offers a double major 
in mathematics and computer science 
which leads to a Bachelor of Science 
degree. The program is designed for 
students with strong interest in each of 
these fields. The program is excellent for 
graduate study, and also provides a solid 
background for employment in the ever- 
growing field of statistics and computer- 
science. 

The individual curricula for the 
mathematics and computer science majors 
are very similar. To obtain a double major, 
students must complete the requirements 
for the degree in computer science, and 
take five additional approved upper level 
mathematics courses. 



FRESHMAN 



CPS 101 Intro to Programming: 

PASCAL 
MTH 151 Calculus I 
HIS Core Elective 

ENG 103 Composition 
SOC110 Anthropology 



3 
3 

3 
3 

_3 
15 



CPS 121 Computer Programming 

MTH 152 Calculus II 

HIS Core Elective 

POL 100 American Nat'l Gov't 

PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 



SOPHOMORE 



MTH 225 Calculus III 4 

PHY 221 General Physics I 4 

FA 201 Civilization through Art I 3 



CPS 231 Introduction to File 
Processing 



MTH 244 Set Theory & Logic 
PHY 222 General Physics II 
FA 202 Civilization through Art II 
ENG 339 Technical Writing 
CPS 232 Data Structures & 

Algorithmic Analysis 



15 



JUNIOR 



MTH 241 Linear Algebra 3 

MTH 363 Abstract Algebra I 3 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 3 

ENG Literature Core Elective 3 
CPS 221 Introduction to 

Computer Systems 3 
CPS 331 Organization of 

Programming Languages 3 
18 



MTH 215 Math Statistics 
MTH 364 Abstract Algebra II 
PHL Core Elective 

ENG Literature Core Elective 

CPS 222 Computer Organization 
CPS 412 Computers and Society 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



16 



3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 

18 



SENIOR 



CPS 321 Operating Systems & 

Computer Architecture 

CPS 431 Software Design & 
Development 

MTH 341 Principles of Analysis I 
FREE Elective 
RLS Core Elective , 

MTH Elective 



CPS 432 Database Management 
Systems Design 



3 
3 


Independent Study 
MTH 421 Numerical Analysis 
MTH 342 Principles of 


3 
3 


3 

3 
3 


Analysis II 
RLS Core Elective 


3 
3 



IS 



15 



Total required for graduation: 130 credits 

Upper division courses are offered in alternate years, so that a student's schedule may not 
follow this sequence exactly. For example, courses that are shown in the senior year may 
be taken in the junior year and vice versa. 



THE CURRICULA 



Medical Technology Major 

Division of Allied Health Professions 
Degree: B.S., Medical Technology 
Program Director: Stanley Knapich 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Through its affiliation with hospital 
schools of Medical Technology, College 
Misericordia's Medical Technology 
program enables students to complete the 
requirements for a Bachelor of Science 
degree in four years. 

Medical Technology majors should apply 
for acceptance to an affiliated hospital 
program at the end of their fourth 
semester at College Misericordia. 
Admission to a hospital school of Medical 
Technology for the fourth year of study 
is not guaranteed. 

Following the hospital program, the 
student is eligible to sit for the 
certification examinations offered by the 
Board of Registry of Medical 
Technologists and the National 
Accrediting Agency for Medical 
Laboratory Personnel. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



FRESHMAN 



CHM 133 Chemical Principles I 

HIS Core Elective 

BIO 101 Botany & Introductory 

Biological Principles 
ENG 103 Composition 
MTH Math Bank I 



BIO 251 Comparative Anatomy & 

Histotechnique I 4 

CUM 243 Organic Chemistry I 4 

FA 201 Civilization through Art I 3 
PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 3 



14 



4 


( 1 IM 134 Chemical Principles II 


i 


3 


Ills Core Elective 


3 




BIO 102 General Zoology 


i 


4 


SOC 110 Anthropology 


3 


3 


MED 100 Introduction to Medical 




3 


Technology 


1 


L7 




15 


SOPHOMORE 





BIO 252 Comparative Anatomy & 

Histotechnique II 
CHM 244 Organic Chemistry II 
FA 202 Civilization through Art II 
POL 100 American Nat'l Gov't 
MTH 115 Statistics 



JUNIOR 



MED 400 Clinical Microbiology 
MED 401 Clinical Chemistry 



4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
17 



CHM 353 Biochemistry 


3 


BIO 243 


General Microbiology 


4 


PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 


3 


PHL 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


ENG Literature Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


CPS 100 Introduction to 




BIO 346 


General Physiology 


J 


Programming: BASIC 


3 

15 


BIO 360 


Immunology 


1 
18 




SENIORS 







MED 402 Clinical Hematology/ 

Coagulation 
MED 405 Clinical Seminar 
MED 403 Clinical Immunohematology 
MED 404 Clinical Immunology 

/Serology 



15 



Total required for graduation. 126 credits 



46 



THE CURRICULA 



Medical Technology 
Clinical Associates 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



Divine Providence Hospital, 

Williamsport, Pa., 

Loretta A. Moffatt, M.T., A.S.C.P. 

Program Director. 

Galal Ahmed, M.D., Pathologist 

Medical Director 

Lancaster General Hospital 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Nadine E. Gladfelter, M.T., A.S.C.P. 

Program Director 

Gerald R. Fahs, M.D. 

Medical Director 

Polyclinic Medical Center of Harrisburg 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lynn Russell, M.T., A.S.C.P. 

Education Coordinator 

Julian W. Potok, M.D. 

Program Director 

Robert Packer Hospital 

Sayre, Pa. 

James L. Bender, M.S., C.L.S. 

Program Director 

Joseph J. King, M.D. 

Medical Director 

Sacred Heart Hospital 

Allentown, Pa. 

Sandra Neiman, M.T., A.S.C.P. 

Education Coordinator 

Dr. Kostelnik, M.D. 

Medical Director 

Scranton Medical Technology Consortium 

Scranton, Pa. 

Mary Gene Butler, M.S., M.T., A.S.C.P. 

Program Director 

Thomas DiSilvio, M.D. 

Medical Director 

Wilkes-Barre General Hospital 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Helen Ruane, M.T., A.S.C.P. 

Educational Coordinator 

C. Warren Koehl, M.D. 

Medical Director 



4" 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Nursing Major 

Philosophy 

Division of Nursing 

Degree: B.S.N. /Nursing -r- ne Division of Nursing supports the Mission Statement and the 

Program Director: Gertrude Torres Philosophy of the College. 

Concerned with the worth and dignity of the whole person, the 
Division of Nursing strives for a holistic view of each human 
being, taking into account the physical structure, mind and 
spirit of an individual person, as well as the physical and social 
environment in which each one functions. The Division of 
Nursing perceives individuals in the context of both family and 
group or community units, units which concurrently maintain 
the stability of society and provide the flexibility necessary for 
the growth and development of each member. 

The Division of Nursing believes that a person has the right to 
that level of wellness which enables maximization of human 
potential as an individual, as a family member, and as a group 
or community member. Therefore, the philosophy of the 
Division of Nursing affirms that: 

1. Health and illness are intricately related in the dynamics 
of wellness. 

2. The level of wellness attained by a person is directly 
related to and influenced by the level of wellness in the 
family and group or community. 

The practice of professional nursing is an essential service for 
the prevention of illness, the promotion, maintenance and 
restoration of wellness, and the care of the dying. 

The Division of Nursing facilitates the education of nursing 
students who collaborate with other professional and allied 
health personnel providing health care to persons, families, 
groups or communities in a variety of settings and cultures. 

The beginning professional who follows the nursing curriculum 
learns to provide vital, effective and efficient nursing services 
in a total health care system. In conjunction with the 
curriculum, the nursing process incorporates cognitive, 
affective, and psychomotor skills. 

The nursing curriculum which includes a strong liberal arts and 
science base, as well as theory and the clinical practice of 
nursing, promotes the growth and development of the student in 
the process of change. In addition, communication skills, the 
analysis of legal, ethical and professional issues, the 
development of teaching learning and leadership skills, and the 
practice of critical thinking throughout the course of study 
provide the student with a foundation for graduate study, for 
research and for life-long learning. 



48 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certification 



jNursing Major Policies: 

(cont.) 



In addition to the general policies of College Misericordia, the 
following regulations apply to students in the Division of Nursing: 

Off-Campus Student Employment 

It is the policy of the Division of Nursing that full-time students 
carrying 12 credit hours cannot commit themselves to more than 24 
hours a week in off-campus positions. Full-time nursing students 
who wish to work part-time should discuss their plans with their 
faculty nursing advisor. 

When students are employed in a health agency, they may not 
perform the functions of a professional or practical nurse. 
Exceptions to this rule are students in the evening program who are 
licensed RNs or LPNs. 

Academic Advisement 

Faculty members assist students in planning their academic schedule 
each semester. Faculty advisors are available to provide individual 
counseling and advisement as needs arise. 

Absences 

Students are expected to attend classes and clinical practica. 
Absences from clinical practica are permitted only in unusual 
circumstances. Time lost from clinical practica must be made up. 

Transportation: 

Students are responsibile for their own transportation to and from 
clinical agencies. Students will be assigned to clinical agencies 
located in Luzerne and Lackawanna counties. Each student is 
required to have an automobile for Community Health Nursing. 
Area health agencies cooperating with the nursing program include: 
Community Medical Center, Scranton; Meadows Nursing Center, 
Dallas; Mercy Hospital, Scranton; Mercy Hospital, Wilkes-Barre; 
Nesbitt Memorial Hospital, Kingston; Pennsylvania Department of 
Health, Luzerne and Lackawanna Counties; Veternan's 
Administration Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre, and others. 

Special Expenses 

In addition to the College tuition and fees, expenses for the nursing 
program include: nursing uniforms, laboratory and nursing fees, 
liability insurance, National League for Nursing Achievement and/or 
other assessment tests, State Board of Nursing Licensure and 
Examination, and the nursing pin. Although not required, students 
are urged to join the Student Nurse Association of Pennsylvania. 

Insurance Liability and CPR Certification 

Liability Insurance and CPR certification are required prior to 

enrolling in any nursing course. 



49 



THE CLRRICULA 



Nursing Major 

(cont.) 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



\1cdical/ Health Care Insurance 

Students are responsible for providing their own health care 

insurance. Students are responsible for any and all health care 

financial obligations incurred. Health care insurance is 

a\ ailable for students through the College. 

Physical Examinations 

Annual physical examinations are required for admission to 
nursing courses, and records of the examinations must be on 
file in the Student Health Services office by July 1 of each 
academic year. Health requirements specified by the Division 
of Nursing must be fulfilled. 

Clinical Capabilities of Students in Nursing 
It is the faculty's belief that students of nursing are responsible 
for the knowledge and practice of theory and practical skills 
acquired in the nursing curriculum. The faculty believe that 
students of nursing need time to learn and to apply theory and 
skills for the development of safe nursing practice. Therefore, 
the faculty believes that safety is of utmost importance in 
clinical practice for both the student and the client. 

The Division of Nursing stipulates provisions for all students of 
nursing. The provisions state that the student of nursing will 
be able to: 

1. Fulfill the clinical objectives related to physical and 
sensory nursing activities. 

2. Comply with contracted agency policies for physical and 
sensory abilities in the clinical setting. 

3. Provide written documentation by a physician regarding 
the student's abilities for clinical practice. 
Additional information may be found in the Division of 
Nursing policies for physical examination. 

Selection, Advancement and Graduation Criteria 

Admission into Pre-Nursing 

Students admitted to the Pre-Nursing Program (freshman year) 
must meet the general admission requirements of College 
Misericordia. Applicants must have completed one year each 
of chemistry, biology, and math (including a semester of 
algebra) in high school, achieving at least a grade of "C" in 
each course. Admission to the Pre-Nursing Program does not 
guarantee advancement into the professional nursing program. 



50 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Nursing Major Advancement into the Professional Program 

(cont.) (Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years) 

Application to the professional nursing major is made during 
the freshman year. Forty-five (45) seats are available at the 
sophomore level. Screening of eligible applicants will occur at 
the end of the first semester of sophomore year based upon the 
following criteria: 

A. The criteria for selection include: 

1. a G.P.A. of 2.5 or above; each semester and 
overall G.P.A.; 

2. grade of "C" or above in BIO 211 and F&N 241; 

3. a score at or above the 40th percentile on the 
National League for Nursing preadmission test 
administered at the end of the freshman year; 

4. documented participation in Nursing Division 
activities or College Misericordia's chapter of 
S.N. A. P.; 

5. at least 30 hours of documented service (15 hrs/ 
semester) in a health care setting—references are 
required; 

6. a personal interview with the Academic Review 
Committee of the Division of Nursing may be 
required. 



B. Submission of medical documentation which confirms 
student's ability to successfully fulfill all program 
requirements, mentally and physically. 

C. Admission to the nursing major will be preferential 
based on completion of criteria and seats available. 
Pre-nursing students' records will be monitored for 
advisement purposes. 

Retention in a Nursing Major 

Retention in the program is based upon the following criteria: 

A. Maintenance of a GPA of 2.5 each semester. 

B. Maintenance of an overall GPA of 2.5. 

C. A grade of C in all required nursing courses. 

D. Students may repeat three (3) nursing courses (a 
maximum of 7 credits) once. 

E. Students who replace a nursing course grade must 
attend the corequisite nursing theory courses 
without additional fees. 



51 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

Nursing Major 

(cont.) F. Successful achievement of a score at or above the 

40th percentile in standardized achievement tests 
following each year of professional study. 

G. Compliance with the nursing Student Code of 

Ethics (see Division of Nursing Student Handbook 
for details). 

H. The sequential nature of the major dictates that 

all specified prerequisites in the major be 
successfully completed before proceeding to the 
next semester. 

Failure to meet one or more of these criteria may result in the 
student's dismissal from the program. Appeal policies appear in 
the Division of Nursing Student Handbook. 

Graduation Requirements 

A. Students must meet all of the graduation 
requirements established by College Misericordia 
and the Division of Nursing. (See Division of 
Nursing Student Handbook for details.) 

B. Students must successfully attain a score at or 
above the 40th percentile in a major specific 
competency examination. 

State Board Requirements 

The Division of Nursing, in accordance with the State Board of 
Nurse Examiners, advises all nursing students that felonious acts 
prohibit licensure in Pennsylvania as of January 1, 1986. The 
following is taken from the Law. 

The Board shall not issue a license of certificate to an applicant 
who has been: 

1. convicted* of a felonious act prohibited by the act 
of April 14, 1972 (P.L. 233, No. 64), known as 
"The Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and 
Cosmetic Act", or 

2. convicted* of a felony relating to a controlled 
substance in a court of law of the United States 
and any other state, territory or country unless: 

a. at least ten years have elapsed from the 

date of the conviction; 



52 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Nursing Major b. the applicant satisfactorily demonstrates 

(cont.) to the Board significant progress in 



personal rehabilitation since the 
conviction such that licensure should not 
create a substantial risk of further 
violations; and 

c. the applicant otherwise satisfies the 

qualifications contained in this act. 

A person convicted of any felonious act may be prohibited from 
licensure by the Board of Nursing at any time. 

*Convicted includes a judgment, an admission of guilt or a plea 
of nolo contendere. 

Non-traditional Students: Evening Accelerated Degree Program 
(R.N.s, L.P.N.s, adult students who wish to earn a B.S.N.) 

The Division of Nursing offers the entire nursing course 
sequence for the adult learner in an accelerated evening program 
format. All classes are held for 7 1 /2 weeks each term and vary from 
two to three evenings per week. Transfer students who possess 
college credits and/or other degrees are evaluated individually for 
entry into the program. 

RN students with a diploma or an A.S. degree in nursing 
are allowed to validate their knowledge/experience through a 
teacher-made examination for 30 nursing credits. All non-nursing 
transfer college credits will be evaluated by the Registrar to 
determine equivalencies. A. A.S. degree holders will complete the 
maximum of 70 credits at College Misericordia. After successful 
completion of the nursing validation examination, the RN must 
complete the non-nursing sequence of studies outlined in this 
catalog. Up to 21 additional credits in non-nursing courses may 
be awarded through college validation examinations and up to 15 
credits may be attained through CLEP examinations or Prior 
Learning Assessment evaluation. 

Nursing courses required for the RN students generally 
consist of the following, with only one critical practicum required: 

NSG 293-294 6 credits Introduction to Baccalaurte Nursing 

NSG 390 3 credits Nursing Research 

NSG 495 2 credits Nursing Issues and Trends 

NSG 451 3 credits Advanced Nursing Concepts over the Life 

Span II 
NSG 456 3 credits Application of Nursing Concepts over the 

Life Span II 
NSG 462 4 credits Clinical Application of Nursing Concepts 

over the Life Span II (Practicum Course) 



53 



THE CURRICULA 



Nursing Major 
(cont.) 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

LPN nurses are allowed to validate up to 10 nursing credits 
through a teacher-made examination. Upon successful completion 
of this examination, the following nursing courses will be waived: 
NSG 350, NSG 355, NSG 361 . For admission into the nursing major, 
LPN's follow the same criteria as outlined for the full-time nursing 
student, with the following exception: GPA requirements will be 
evaluated after every 9 credits. All other requirements for the 
nursing major pertain to this student. For additional information 
about courses sequences or policies relative to this program, contact 
either the Continuing Education Office or the Division of Nursing. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



CHM 104 General Chemistry II 

ENG 103 Composition 

HIS Core Elective 

MTH Math Bank I 

SOC 110 Anthropology 



FRIuSHMAN 



3 

3 

3 
3 

is 



CHM 105 Introduction to 

Organic Chemistry 
HIS Core Elective 

POL 100 American Nat'l Gov't 
PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 
SOC 321 The Family 



3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SOPHOMORE 



BIO 211 Anatomy and Physiology 
BIO 227 Bacteriology 

ENG Literature Core Elective 



F&N 241 Fundamentals of Nutrition 
FA 201 Civilization through Art I 



3 
3 

17 



NSG 200 Introduction to 

Nursing Concepts 
NSG 265 Basic Clinical 

Nursing Strategies 
BIO 212 Anatomy and Physiology 
ENG Literature Core Elective 

FA 202 Civilization through An II 
PHL Core Elective 



1 
i 
3 
3 
3 

r 



Jl'NIOR 



NSG 350 Intermediate Nursing 

Concepts I 3 

NSG 355 Application of Intermediate 

Nursing Concepts I 3 

NSG 361 Clinical Application of 

Intermediate Concepts I 4 
NSG 365 Intermediate Clinical 

Nursing Strategies 1 

MTH 115 Statistics 3 

PHL Core Elective 3 

RLS Core Elective 3 

17 



NSG 351 Intermediate Nursing 

Concepts II 
NSG 356 Application of Intermediate 

Concepts II 
NSG 362 Clinical Application of 

Intermediate Nursing 

Concepts II 
NSG 366 Advanced Clinical Nursing 

Strategics 
NSG 390 Nursing Research 



1 
3 

17 



SI MOR 



Nst i 450 Advanced Nursing 

Concepts I 
\Mi455 Application of Advanced 

Nursing Concepts I 
NSG 461 Clinical Application 

of Advanced Nursing 

Concepts I 
RLS Core Elective 

FREE Elective 



4 
3 
3 

16 



NSG 451 Advanced Nursing 

Concepts II 
NSG 456 Application of Advanced 

Nursing Concepts II 
NSG 462 Clinical Application of 
Advanced Nursing 

Concepts II 
NSG 495 Leadership and Issues 

in Nursing Seminar 
FREE Elective 



_3 
15 



Total required for graduation: 129 credits 



54 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Occupational Therapy Major College Misericordia's program in Occupational Therapy 

provides students with knowledge, skills and techniques 
Division of Allied Health Professions necessary to assume entry level positions as registered 

Degree: B.S. /Occupational Therapy occupational therapists. The prescribed course of study meets 

Program Director: Stephen L. Heater or exceeds the requirements of an accredited educational 

program for occupational therapists as established by the 
American Occupational Therapy Association. 

The primary responsibility of the occupational therapist is to 
help the disabled and disadvantaged achieve a maximum level 
of independent functioning in self-care, work and leisure 
occupations. Occupational Therapy graduates are readily 
employed in clinics, hospitals, home health agencies, 
rehabilitation centers, mental retardation centers, schools, 
nursing homes, psychiatric centers, and other related human 
service agencies. The College's program is associated with more 
than 200 hospitals nationwide which provide comprehensive 
fieldwork options for Occupational Therapy students. 

College Misericordia's program in Occupational Therapy is 
solidly based in the liberal arts and sciences and the traditional 
philosophical concepts that guide the profession. The program 
supports the belief that human beings are intrinsically motivated 
to fulfill their basic needs through purposeful occupation. 
Occupation, as it is translated into self care, work and play/ 
leisure, provides the foundation for growth, development and 
adaptation throughout the lifespan. The program adheres 
closely to the belief that purposeful occupation and its 
effectiveness in promoting growth, change and adaptation, 
makes Occupational Therapy unique among health care 
professions. 

The Occupational Therapy Program is accredited by the 
committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the 
American Medical Association in conjunction with the 
Accreditation Committee of the American Occupational Therapy 
Association. Graduates of the program will be able to sit for 
the national certification examination for the occupational 
therapist administered by the American Occupational Therapy 
Certification Board. After successful completion of this exam, 
the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered 
(OTR). Many states require licensure in order to practice; 
however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the 
AOTCB Certification Exam. 

Policies 

In addition to the general policies of College Misericordia, the 
following regulations apply to Occupational Therapy majors: 



5 5 



THE (TRRKTI.A 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 

Major 



Students arc responsible for transportation and travel costs to 
and from assigned practicum and fieldwork centers. Such 
assignments begin in the sophomore year and continue 
throughout the program. Students should expect to pay room 
and board expenses during the senior year fieldwork assignments 
in the event that the affiliated hospital or clinic docs not cover 
such expenses. 

Related Expenses 

Additional expenses for OT students normally include laboratory 
fees, uniforms, name pins, school patches, malpractice liability 
insurance and certification examination fee. Although not 
required, students are urged to join the American Occupational 
Therapy Association and the Pennsylvania Occupational Therapy 
Association at the reduced student rates. 

Selection, Advancement and Graduation Criteria 

Admission into Pre-Occupational TJicrapy (Traditional, full-time 
day classes) 

Students admitted into Pre-Occupational Therapy (freshman 
year) must meet the general admission requirements of College 
Misericordia. Applicants must have one year of high school 
chemistry and one year of biology with grades of "C" or better. 
Admission to Pre-OT does not guarantee advancement into the 
professional OT Program. (sophomore, junior, senior year). 
(Sixty-five (65) seats are available in Pre-OT each year). 

Advancement into the Professional Program 
(Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years) 

Forty (40) seats are available at the sophomore level. Students 
will be ranked based upon the following criteria: 



A. A minimum 2.5 GPA in the following prescribed 

courses or their equivalents: 

BIO 103 General Biology I 3 

BIO 104 General Biology II 3 

ENG 103 Composition 3 

GER 241 Intro, to Gerontology 3 

PSY 123 Intro, to Psychology 3 

SOC 110 Anthropology 3 

MTH 115 Basic Statistics 

(30 total credits must be earned in order to advance to 

sophomore (professional level) status) 



56 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Occupational Therapy B. Attendance in OT 101/102 Seminar. (Transfers 

(cont.) may substitute 100 hours of documented service 



in an occupational therapy setting). 

C. Documented participation in College Misericordia 
Student OT Association and related program 
activities. (Transfers must attend at least two 
district or local OT meetings and show 
documentation accordingly). 

D. At least 30 hours of documented service in a 
health care setting. References required. 

E. A personal interview with the Occupational 
Therapy Student Selection and Retention 
Committee. 

F. Submission of medical documentation which 
confirms students' ability to successfully fulfill 
all program requirements, mentally and 
physically. 



An overall 2.5 GPA in all work attempted at College 
Misericordia must be demonstrated at time of 
screening. Screening will occur at the end of the 
spring semester when final grades are received. 



Admission of COT A (Certified OT Assistant) Transfers 

A limited number of junior entry-level positions are available each 
year for COTAs who possess the AS/AAS degree or certificate. 
Three options exist for COTA entry: 

Option 1. full or part-time day classes. 

Option 2. part-time, weekend college classes. 

Option 3. Teaching Assistant Program 

Students are selected for these 3 options based upon the 
following criteria: 

A. Overall GPA from OTA program (2.5 minimum) 

B. Documented certification by AOTCB 

C. Three letters of reference, of which two must 
be from OTRs 



5" 



THE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 

(cont.) 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

D. Interview with OT Faculty 

*(for Week-end college applicants, full or part-time employment 
must be maintained throughout the program) 

*(for teaching assistant applicants, an aptitude for teaching must be 
demonstrated) 

*(once admitted, all retention policies apply) 

* application deadline is April 15th. 

Admission of Bachelor degree holders who desire a Second 
Bachelors in Occupational Therapy. 

Part-time, weekend college classes are offered for those who hold 
degrees in other fields from accredited institutions. 

Students are selected based upon the following criteria: 

1. Overall GPA from accredited bachelor's degree 
program. (2.5 minimum) 

2. A maximum 500-word personal statement citing 
reasons for pursuing a career in occupational 
therapy and outlining personal and professional 
objectives. 

3. Three letters of reference from supervisors, co- 
workers or colleagues attesting to the applicant's 
suitability for a career in occupational therapy. 

4. A personal interview with the Occupational Therapy 
Faculty. 

5. Documentation of two on-site visits to observe 
occupational therapy programming in two distinct 
settings. 

(Once admitted, all retention policies apph 

*application deadline is April 15. 



Retention in the Program (Entry level) 

Retention in the Program is based upon the following criteria: 
A. Maintenance of a 2.5 overall GPA each semester. 



58 



THE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 

(cont.) 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

B. Successful completion of all OT Comprehensive 

Examinations with a score of 74% or better. 



C. Compliance with the Occupational Therapy 
Student Code of Ethics (in OT Program Guide). 

D. The sequential nature of the major dictates that 
all specified prerequisites in the major be 
successfully completed before proceeding to the 
next semester. 

Failure to meet one or more of these criteria will result in the 
student's dismissal from the program. Appeal policies appear in 
the OT Program Guide. 

Graduation Requirements 

A. Students must meet all of the graduation 

requirements established by College Misericordia. 



B. Students must complete all required 

Comprehensive Examinations with a score of 74% 
or better. 



59 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Occupational Therapj 

(cont.) 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 

FRESHMAN 



OT10I 


Seminar (or equivalent)' 





OTI02 


BIO 103 


General Biology I" 


3 


BIO 104 


ENG 103 


Composition' 


3 


GER241 


HIS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 


3 


MTH 115 


PSY 123 


Intro to Psychology* 


3 


SOC 110 



15 
'required for advancement into sophomore level. 



OT Seminar (or equivalent)' 

General Biology II" 3 

Intro to Gerontology* 3 

Core Elective 3 

Basic Statistics* 3 

Anthropology* 3 
15 



OT203 



OT209 

OT217 
BIO 211 
PHY 107 
FA 201 



SOPHOMORE 



Human Development & 

Occupational 

Performance 
Occupational Processes 

& AnalysisI 
Concepts of Wellness 
Anatomy & Physiology I 
Intro to Physics I 
Civilization through Art I 



OT204 



OT2I0 

PSY 232 
BIO 212 
POL 100 

FA 202 



History, Philosophy & 
Functions 

Occupational Processes 

& Analysis II 
Research Methods 
Anatomy &Physiology II 
American Nat'l Gov't 
Civilization through An II 



2 
3 

4 

3 
3 
18 



JUNIOR 



OT 301 Intervention I 



4 OT 302 Intervention II 



OT 309 Sensorimotor Processes & OT 310 

Occupational Performance 3 

OT 317 Practicum I 1 OT 318 

ENG Literature Core Elective 3 ENG 

PSY 334 Maladaptive Behavior 3 PHL 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 3 RLS 

17 



Movement. Measurement & 
Occupational Performance 
Practicum II 
Literature Core Elective 
Core Elective 
Core Elective 



SENIOR 



OT 401 Intervention III 

OT 415 Practicum III 

OT 419 Leadership 

RLS Core Elective 

FREE Elective 



4 OT 440 Ficldwork in Psychosocial 

Intervention 6 

1 OT 444 Ficldwork in Physical-Social 

Intervention 6 

2 

3 OT446 Special Interest Ficldwork 

3 Option var . 

13 12 



Total required for graduation: 125 credits 



60 



THE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 
Clinical Associates 



CALIFORNIA 

Centre For Neuro Skills 
Bakersfield, California 
Laurie Recalde, OTR 

Veterans Administration 
Medical Center 
San Diego, California 
Patricia Gerko, OTR 

COLORADO 

Wheat Ridge Regional Center 
Wheat Ridge, Colorado 
Wendy Sime, OTR/L 

CONNECTICUT 

Gaylord Hospital 
Wallingford, Connecticut 
Carolyn Morrone, OTR/L 

Institute for Living 
Hartford, Connecticut 
Rosemarie Weber, OTR/L 

DELAWARE 

Alfred I. Dupont Institute 
Wilmington, Delaware 
Cheryl Morris, OTR 

John G. Leach School 
New Castle, Delaware 
Donald C. Temme, OTR 

Medical Center of Delaware 
Newark, Delaware 
Rebecca Whitney, OTR 

Stockley Center 
Georgetown, Delaware 
Dawn Stewart, OTR 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Greater Southeast Community Hospital 
Washington, D.C. 
Maggie Ritz, OTR 

National Rehabilitation Hospital 

Washington, D.C. 

Susan Merrill, MA, OTR L 



Psychiatric Institute 
Washington, D. C. 
Sandra Cohen, OTR 

Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Washington, D.C. 
Cpt. Joan Lyon 

FLORIDA 

Bethesda Memorial Hospital 
Boynton Beach, Florida 
Gail Norris, OTR/L 

Fair Oaks Hospital 
Delray Beach, Florida 
Julie Budzinski, MA, CTRS 

Forty Fifth Street Mental Health Center 
West Palm Beach, Florida 
Karen Knowles, OTR/L 

Lake Hospital 
Lake Worth, Florida 
Pat Arnold, OTR/L 

Pinecrest Hospital 
Delray Beach, Florida 
Karen Nantel, OTR 

Veterans Administration Medical Center 
Bay Pines, Florida 
Donna Archer, OTR 

GEORGIA 

Emory University Hospital 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Mary Martha Robinson, OTR/L 

ILLINOIS 

Mercy Hospital and Medical Center 
Chicago, Illinois 
Barbara Townsend, OTR 

KANSAS 

Bethany Medical Center 
Kansas City, Kansas 
David Blodgett, MA, OTR 



61 



THE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 
Clinical Associates 



KIMKKV 

Frazier Rehabilitation Center 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Kerne Johnson, OTR/L 

MARYLAND 

Maryland School for the Blind 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Peggy Outen, OTR/L 

Montgomery County Public Schools 
Bethesda, Maryland 
Victoria Bell, MS, OTR/L 

St. Agnes Hospital 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Carol Kammer, OTR/L 

Washington County Hospital Association 
Hagerstown, Maryland 
Emily Jeter, OTR/L 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Charles River Hospital 
Wellesley, Massachusetts 
Janet Abeles, M.Ed., OTR/L 

New England Sinai Hospital 
Stoughton, Massachusetts 
Cindy Bertrand, OTR/L 

Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Virginia Morgan, OTR/L 

Veteran Administration Medical Center 
Northampton, Massachusetts 
Bob LaPalme, OTR 1 

MICHIGAN 

Lafayette Clinic 
Detroit, Michigan 
Mary Kay Currie, OTR 

Pontiac Osteopathic Hospital 
Pontiac, Michigan 
Peggy Fillion, OTR 



The Rehabilitation Institute 
Detroit, Michigan 
Laura Miller, OTR 

MONTANA 

Montana Deaconess Medical Center 
Great Falls, Montana 
Kathy Bradley, OTR 

NEW JERSEY 

Betty Bacharach Rehabilitation Hospital 
Pomona, New Jersey 
Sharon Grunow, OTR 

Garden State Rehabilitation Hospital 
Toms River, New Jersey 
Julie Metcalf, OTR 

Hand Rehabilitation Center 
Union, New Jersey 
Gloria Hershman, OTR 

John F. Kennedy Medical Center 
Edison, New Jersey 
Shelley Levin, OTR 

Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation 
West Orange, New Jersey 
Claude Lundgren, OTR 

Marlboro Psychiatric Hospital 
Marlboro, New Jersey 
Joan Tucker, OTR 

Our Lady of Lourdes EIP 
Camden, New Jersey 
Margaret Schock, OTR 

Overlook Hospital 
Summit, New Jersey 
Renee Zarneti, OTR 

Rehabilitation Center for the Handicapped 
Morris Plains, New Jersey 
Carolyn Young, COTA 

St. Barnabas Medical Center 
Li\ingston, New Jersey 
Susan Grover, OTR 



62 



THE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 
Clinical Associates 



NEW JERSEY 

St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center 
Lawrenceville, New Jersey 
Joan Manley, OTR 

Somerset Medical Center 
Somerville, New Jersey 
Janice Zuzov, OTR 

Step By Step EIP 
Camden, New Jersey 
Carol Petrokonis, OTR 

Trenton Psychiatric Hospital 
West Trenton, New Jersey 
Marie L. Peterson, OTR 

Welkind Rehabilitation Hospital 
Chester, New Jersey 
Ellen Persechino, OTR 

NEW YORK 

Albany Medical Center 
Albany, New York 
Barbara Hart, OTR/L 

Binghamton Psychiatric Center 
Binghamton, New York 
Linda Kaufman, OTR/L 

Brooklyn Developmental Center 
Brooklyn, New York 
Miriam Kothencz, OTR/L 

Broome Developmental Center 
Binghamton, New York 
Merida Pedro, OTR/L 

Churchill School 
for Learning Disabilities 
New York, New York 
Nancy Carroll, OTR/L 

Downstate Medical Center 
Brooklyn, New York 
Toni Hana, OTR/L 

Elizabeth A. Horton Memorial Hospital 
Middletown, New York 
Jane Cassatta, OTR/L 



Handicapped Children's Association 
of Southern New York 
Johnson City, New York 
Julianne Keller, OTR/L 

J.N. Adam Developmental Center 
Perrysburg, New York 
Margaret Stratton, OTR/L 

Lourdes Hospital 
Binghamton, New York 
Tammy Telfor, OTR/L 

Rehabilitation Services 
Binghamton, New York 
Dittie Jo McElwain, OTR/L 

St. Francis Hospital 
Poughkeepsie, New York 
Peggy Loscalzo, OTR/L 

Sullivan Diagnostic Treatment Center 
Harris, New York 
Cheryl Labella, OTR/L 

UHS-Wilson Division 
Johnson City, New York 
Marilyn Marvin Goss, OTR/L 
Wendy Carter, OTR/L 

Veterans Administration 
Medical Center 
Albany, New York 
Becky Campis, OTR/L 

Veterans Administration Medical Center 
Bronx, New York 
Enid Weissman, OTR/L 

Wassaic Developmental Center 
Was-saic, New York 
Deborah Shaffer, OTR/L 

OHIO 

Nisonger Center 
Columbus, Ohio 
Carolyn Patterson, MS, OTR/L 



63 



THE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 
Clinical Associates 



OHIO 

Ohio State University 

Columbus, Ohio 

Pat Warnecke, OTR/L 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Adult Services Unlimited 
Plains, Pennsylvania 
Robin Yedlock, OTR/L 

Albert Einstein Medical Center 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
C'\nthia Kwasniewski, OTR/L 

Allentown State Hospital 
Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Gregory Boyer, OTR/L 

Allied Home Health Services 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Maria Palonis 

Allied Services for the Handicapped 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Judith Doss, OTR/L 

Altoona Hospital Community Mental 
Health Center 
Altoona, Pennsylvania 
Kim Witkovski, OTR/L 

Beaver County Community 
Mental Health Center 
Rochester, Pennsylvania 
Dorothy Witke, OTR/L 

Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital 
Malvern, Pennsylvania 
Mary Beth Hoffman, OTR/L 

Carlisle Hospital 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania 
Barbara Berry, OTR/L 

Central Susquehanna IU # 16 
Lewisburg, Pennsylvania 
Adrienne Roth, OTR/L 



Chambersburg Hospital 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 
Melanie Wennick, OTR/L 

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Lisa Kurtz. OTR/L 

Clarks Summit State Hospital 
Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania 
Karl Young, OTR/L 

Clearbrook, Inc. 
Shickshinny, Pennsylvania 
John Conahan 
Janice Masich 

Colonial Northampton Intermediate Unit # 20 
Nazareth, Pennsylvania 
Sally L. Guttman, OTR/L 

Columbia Montour Home Health 
Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania 
Pam Miller, OTR/L 

Community Medical Center 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Debbie Curley, OTR/L 

Conemaugh Valley Hospital 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
Elizabeth Swan, OTR/L 

Crozier-Chester Medical Center 
Chester, Pennsylvania 
Carol Heisner, OTR/L 

Danville State Hospital 
Danville, Pennsylvania 
Christine Hischmann, MS, OTR/L 

Eagleville Hospital 
Eagleville, Pennsylvania 
Janet Tobia, OTR/L 

East Hills Rehabilitation 
and Fitness Institute, Inc. 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
Barbara Lehman, OTR/L 



64 



THE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 
Clinical Associates 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Easton Hospital 
Easton, Pennsylvania 
Noreen Zavorsky, OTR/L 

Elizabethtown Hospital 
Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 
Jean Savina, OTR/L 

Eugenia Hospital 

Lafayette Hills, Pennsylvania 

Joan Eltonhead, OTR/L 

Franklin Regional Medical Center 
Franklin, Pennsylvania 
Tim Berry 

Fox Chase Cancer Center 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
June P. Villeco, OTR/L 

Geisinger Medical Center 
Danville, Pennsylvania 
Richard Schoch, OTR/L 

Geisinger-Wyoming Valley 
Medical Center 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Grace Fisher, OTR/L, MS 



Hiram G. Andrews 
Rehabilitation Center 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
Kathleen Hagerty, OTR/L 

Harmarville Rehabilitation Center 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Jennifer Westphal, OTR/L 

Harrisburg State Hospital 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Linda Pratt, OTR/L 

Haverford State Hospital 
Haverford, Pennsylvania 
Ellen Kremer, OTR/L 

Holy Spirit Hospital CMHC 
Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 
Joan Walters, OTR/L 

Horsham Clinic 
Ambler, Pennsylvania 
Linda Crowll, OTR/L 

Institute of PA Hospital 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Cheryl Williams, OTR/L 



Good Shepherd Home Raker Center 
Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Margee DiSalvi, OTR/L 



John Heinz Institute of Rehabilitation 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Lisa Petcavich, OTR/L 



Hamburg Center 
Hamburg, Pennsylvania 
Hilary Gruber, OTR/L 



Ken Crest Services 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Denise Mayhan, OTR/L 



Hand Rehabilitation Center 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Jolene Anderson, OTR/L 



Lackawanna ARC 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Bill Gibbons 



Hazleton-Nanticoke MH/MR Center 
Nanticoke, Pennsylvania 
Carl Witkowski 



Lancaster County Easter Seals Society 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
Beth P. Shelley, OTR/L 



Head Injury Recovery Center 

at Hillcrest 

Milford, Pennsylvania 

Jill Shuette, OTR/L 



Leader East Rehabilitation Center 
Kingston, Pennsylvania 
Mary Chollack, OTR/L 



65 



THE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 
Clinical Associates 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Luzerne County VNA 
Kingston, Pennsylvania 
Maurice Brubaker, OTR I 

Luzerne IU # 18 
Kingston, Pennsylvania 
Ellen McLaughlin, OTR/L 

Hahnemann University Hospital 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Denise Mayhan, MA, OTR/L 

Luzerne Wyoming County 
Mental Health 
Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania 
Louis Borino 

Magee Rehabilitation Hospital 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Maureen Freda, OTR/L 

Marion Parish, OTR/L 
Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Mayview State Hospital 
Bridgeville, Pennsylvania 
Ardath McDermot, OTR/L 

McKeesport Hospital 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania 
Donna Mayne, OTR/L 

Meadows 

Centre Hall, Pennsylvania 

Patricia McCool, C.T.R.S. 

Mercy Hospital 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Jan Judge 

Mercy Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Mary Lucas Bode, OTR/L 
Pam Woodruff, OTR/L 

Moss Rehabilitation Hospital 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Jovce McCormick, OTR L 



Muhlenberg Hospital Center 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 
Leila Lerch, OTR/L 

Norristown State Hospital 
Norristown, Pennsylvania 
Janet Nesbitt, OTR/L 

Northeast Intermediate Unit #19 
Dunmore, Pennsylvania 
Christa Parry. OTR/L 

Pennsylvania Hand Center, LTD. 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 
Kristine Wellborne, OTR/L 

Philadelphia Psychiatric Center 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Pat Duffy, OTR/L 

Philhaven Hospital 

Mt. Gretna, Pennsylvania 

Linda Wenger, OTR/L 

Pocono Medical Center 

East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania 

Kay Luckner, OTR/L 

Presbyterian University Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Carol Brewer, OTR/L 

Reading Hospital & Medical Center 
Reading, Pennsylvania 
Bill Ritter, OTR/L 

Rehab America 
Jenkintown, Pennsylvania 
Elizabeth Thomas, OTR/L 

Rehabilitation Hospital 
Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania 
Melissa Kutz, OTR/L 

Rehabilitation Institute of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Marcy Custard, OTR/L 



66 



THE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 
Clinical Associates 



PENNSYLVANIA 

St. Agnes Medical Center 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Tracey Vause, OTR/L 

St. Francis General Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Denise Stark, OTR/L 

St. John's General Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

St. Joseph's Center 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Lalit Shah, OTR/L 

St. Joseph Hospital 
and Health Care Center 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
Judith Barton, OTR/L 

S. G. Rehabilitation Agency, Inc. 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania 
Robert Schifano, OTR/L 

St. Joseph's Hospital MH Unit 
Carbondale, Pennsylvania 
Lori Walsh 

St. Luke's Hospital 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 
Bill Starnes, OTR/L 

Somerset State Hospital 
Somerset, Pennsylvania 
Pat Marvin, OTR/L 

Thomas Jefferson 
University Hospital 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Stephen B. Kern, MS, OTR/L 

Timber Court Hand Rehabilitation 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Maureen Westland, OTR/L 

United Cerebral Palsy 
of Delaware County 
Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 
Karen Khengis, OTR/L 



UCP of Lehigh Valley 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 
Susan Martin, OTR/L 

UCP of Northeastern Pennsylvania 
Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania 
Becky Gryczko, OTR/L 

United Rehab Services, Inc. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Lori Bruch 

United Rehab Services, Inc. 
Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania 
Tom Morris 

Veterans Administration Medical Center 
Coatesville, Pennsylvania 
Phyllis Breuninger, OTR/L 

Veterans Administration Medical Center 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Judy Blaisedell, OTR/L 

Veterans Administration Medical Center 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Linda Csech, OTR/L 

Veterans Administration Medical Center 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Warren State Hospital 
Warren, Pennsylvania 
Lee Ellsworth, OTR/L 

Wayne County Memorial Hospital 
Honesdale, Pennsylvania 
Terry Henderson, OTR/L 

Westmoreland Hospital Community 
Mental Health Center 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania 
Ramona Monaco, OTR/L, MPH 

West Penn Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Janet Supowitz, OTR/L 



67 



I HE CURRICULA 



Occupational Therapy 
Clinical Associates 



PENNSYLVANIA 
White Haven Center 
White Haven, Pennsylvania 

Widener Memorial School 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Karen Lewin-Dively, OTR/L 

Williamsport Hospital 
Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
Karen Hill, OTR/L 

Willow Street School 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Helen Morohovech 

Woodhaven Program Temple University 
Philadelphia. Pennsylvania 
Diane Olevnik, OTR/L 

Wyoming Valley Children's Association 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Shari Havrylak, OTR/L 

VIRGINIA 

Memorial Hospital 
Danville, Virginia 
Karen Cromley, OTR 

University of Virginia Medical Center 
Charlottesville, Virginia 
Maribeth Mills, MOT, OTR 

Virginia Baptist Hospital 
Lynchburg, Virginia 
Patricia McCallum, OTR 

Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center 
Fishersville, Virginia 
Ave Maria Mitta, OTR 

WISCONSIN 

Curative Rehabilitation Center 
Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 
Carole G. Ostendorf, OTR 



WASHINGTON 

University of Washington Hospital 
Seattle, Washington 
Marilyn Wittmeyer, OTR 



68 



THE CURRICULA 



Pre-Dentistry 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Optometry 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

Specializations 

Division of Natural Sciences, 
Mathematics, and Computer Science 
Degree: B.S. /Biology 
Program Director: Carl Konecke 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

GRADE REQUIREMENTS 

With the proper selection of elective courses, students who major 
in biology are prepared for post graduate study in dentistry, 
medicine, optometry and veterinary medicine. 

Pre-Dentistry 

A student who has completed a Bachelor of Science in Biology with 
a grade point average of "B" or better, may be recommended to a 
dental school. Information may be obtained from the American 
Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 
60611. 



Pre-Medicine 

A student who has completed a Bachelor of Science in Biology with 
a grade point average of "B" or better, may be recommended to a 
medical college. Preparation for application to medical school 
should begin in the freshman year and continue throughout the 
undergraduate years. Preparation involves a continuous review of 
material covered in all science courses. Such review is imperative 
for a satisfactory performance on the Medical College Admission 
Test which is required by most medical schools. The MCAT should 
be taken in the fall and/or spring of the junior year. 

Students should be aware of the requirements specific to the medical 
school they wish to attend. This information may be obtained from 
the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical 
Association, 535 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. 

Pre-Optometry 

A student who has completed a Bachelor of Science in Biology with 
a grade point average of "B" or better, may be recommended to a 
school of optometry. Information may be obtained from the 
American Optometric Association, 243 North Lindbergh 
Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri 63141. 



Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

A student who has completed a Bachelor of Science in Biology with 
a grade point average of "B" or better, may be recommended to a 
veterinary school. Information may be obtained from the American 
Veterinary Medical Association, 930 North Meacham Road, 
Schaumberg, Illinois 60196. 



THE CURRICULA 



69 



Pre-Dentistr\ 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Optometry 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

Specializations 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Division of Natural Sciences, 
Mathematics, and Computer Science 
Degree: B.S. /Biology 
Program Director: Carl Konecke 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



IRISHMAN 



ENG 103 Composition 
HIS Core Elective 

( IIM 133 Chemical Principles I 
Mill 151 Calculus I 
BIO 101 General Botany and 
Biological Principles 



BIO 241 Genetics 



BIO 251 Comparative Anatomy and 

Histotechnique I 
< HM 243 Organic Chemistry I 
FA 201 Civilization through Art I 



3 MTH 115 Statistics 


3 


3 HIS Core Elective 


3 


4 CHM 134 Chemical Principles II 


4 


3 MTH 152 Calculus II 


3 


BIO 102 General Zoology 
4 
17 


_; 


17 


SOPHOMORE 





4 BIO 252 Comparative Anatomy and 
Histotechnique II 
SOC110 Anthropology 
BIO 346 General Physiology 
CHM 244 Organic Chemistry II 
FA 202 Civilization through Art II 



4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
18 



JUNIOR 



ENG Literature Core Elective 

(IIM 353 Biochemistry 
PHY 221 General Physics I 
BIO 322 Comparative Embryology 

of Vertebrates 
CPS 101 Introduction to 

Programming: PASCAL 



ENG Literature Core Elective 

CHM Elective 

PHY 222 General Physics II 

BIO 243 Microbiology 

BIO 360 Immunology 



16 



15 







SENIOR 






BIO 425 


Ecology 4 


BIO 480 


Biology Research 


1 


BIO 490 


Coordinating Seminar 1 


POL 100 


American Natl Gov't 


3 


PSY 123 


Introduction to Psychology 3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


PHL 101 


Contemporary Self Images 3 


PHL 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 3 
14 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 
13 



Total required for graduation: 125 credits 



-n 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Pre-Law 

Specialization 

Division of Humanities 

Degree: B. A. /English 

Program Director: Rosemarie Savelli 

The pre-law specialization at College 
Misericordia was developed in accordance 
with the Association of American Law 
Schools which recommends that 
prospective law students have a broad 
liberal arts background. The program 
represents sound preparation for the Law 
School Admission Test and the study of 
law. 

The program has been carefully designed 
to develop ability in expression and 
comprehension of English, to afford basic 
information about human institutions and 
values, and to cultivate the ability to think 
creatively and critically with thoroughness 
and independence. 

Students may choose to major in English, 
History, or Liberal Studies. Upon 
satisfactory completion of the pre-law 
specialization, the student may receive a 
Bachelor of Arts degree in English, 
History, or Liberal Studies. 

Pre-law students must register with the 
Program Director's office where advice on 
course selection and information 
concerning the Law School Admission Test 
(LSAT) and law schools can be obtained. 

Pre-law students must fulfill the general 
and specific requirements of the college 
and of the specific major as stated in this 
catalog for retention in the program and 
for recommendation to law school. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



FRESHMAN 



ENG 221 Major British Writers I 3 ENG 222 Major British Writers II 
HIS 101 Western Civilization I 
SOC110 Anthropology 
MTH Math Bank I 
ENG 103 Composition 



3 HIS 102 Western Civilization II 

3 POL 100 American Nafl Gov't 

3 MTH Math Bank II 

3 ENG 105 Research Paper 
15 



SOPHOMORE 



FA 201 


Civilization through Art I 


3 


FA 202 


SCI 


Core Elective 


3 


SCI 


POL 251 


Law Seminar I 


3 


POL 252 


HIS 103 


U.S. History Survey I 


3 


HIS 104 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 

15 


ENG 






JUNIOR 



ENG 247 American Literature I 
ENG 350 Medieval Renaissance 



Civilization through Art II 

Core Elective 

Law Seminar II 

U.S. History Survey II 

Literature Core Elective 



3 ENG 248 American Literature II 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 





Literature 


3 


PSY 123 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


POL 405 


American Constitutional 




POL 406 


American Constitutional 






Law I 


3 




Law II 


3 


ENG 112 


Speech Communication 


1 


HIS 390 


Jr. Research Seminar 


3 


PHL 101 


Contemporary Self Images 


3 
15 


PHL 260 


Practical Logic 


3 
15 






SENIOR 






ENG 203 


Advanced Expository 
Writing 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Advanced English Elective 


3 


ENG 318 


Language Studies 


3 


POL 450 


Law Internship I 


3 


POL 451 


Law Internship II 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


^ 


ENG 


Advanced Elective 


3 


BUS 352 


Business Law 


3 


POL 


Advanced Elective 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 

IN 


FREE 


Elective 


3 

is 



Total required for graduation: 126 credits 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Pre- Law 
Specialization 

Division of Humanities 

Degree: B. A. /History 

Program Director: Rosemarie Savelli 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



FRESHMAN 



ENG 112 Speech Communication 3 POL 100 American Nat'l Gov't 
HIS 101 Western Civilization I 3 MIS 102 Western Civilization II 

SOC110 Anthropology 3 PSY 123 Introduction to 

Psychology 



MTII 


Math Bank I 


3 


MTH 


Math Bank II 


3 


ENG 103 


Composition 


3 
15 


ENG 105 


Research Paper 


3 
15 






SOPHOMORE 




FA 201 


Civilization through Art I 


3 


FA 202 


Civilization through Art II 


3 


SCI 


Core Elective 


3 


SCI 


Core Elective 


3 


POL 251 


Law Seminar I 


3 


POL 252 


Law Seminar II 


3 


HIS 103 


U.S. History Survey I 


3 


HIS 104 


U.S. History Survey II 


i 


HIS/POL 


Elective 


3 
15 


HIS 310 
JUNIOR 


History of England 


3 
15 


HIS 305 


Recent Amer./Domestic 


3 


HIS 390 


Jr. Research Seminar 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


POL 405 


American Constitutional 




POL 406 


American Constitutional 






Law I 


3 




Law II 


3 


PHL 101 


Contemporary Self Images 3 


PHL 260 


Practical Logic 


3 


HIS/POL 


Elective 


3 
15 


HIS 311 
SENIOR 


History of Britain 


3 
15 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS 


Advanced Elective 


3 


POL 


Elective 


3 


ENG 203 


Advanced Expository 
Writing 


3 


ENG 


Advanced Elective 


3 


BUS 352 


Business Law 


3 


SOC 221 


Cultural Minorities 


3 


POL 450 


Internship 


3 


POL 451 


Internship 


3 


"REE 


Elective 


3 
18 


FREE 


Elective 


3 
18 



Total required for graduation: 126 credits 



^2 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Pre-Law 

Specialization 

Division of Humanities 
Degree: B. A. /Liberal Studies 
Program Director: Rosemarie Savelli 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



ENG 112 Speech Communication 

HIS 101 Western Civilization I 

SOC 110 Anthropology 

MTH Math Bank I 

ENG 103 Composition 



FRESHMAN 






3 POL 100 


American Nat'l Gov't 


3 


3 HIS 102 


Western Civilization II 


3 


3 PSY 123 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


3 MTH 


Math Bank II 


3 


3 ENG 105 


Reseach Paper 


3 


15 




15 



SOPHOMORE 



FA 201 


Civilization through Art I 


3 


FA 202 


SCI 


Core Elective 


3 


SCI 


POL 251 


Law Seminar I 


3 


POL 252 


HIS 103 


U.S. History Survey I 


3 


HIS 104 


Liberal 


Studies Minor Area 


3 

15 


FREE 






JUNIOR 


HIS/POL 


. Advanced Elective 


3 


HIS 390 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


PHL 101 


Contemporary Self Image; 


; 3 


PHL 


POL 405 


American Constitutional 




HIS 310 




Law I 


3 


POL 406 


POL 


Advanced elective 


3 




Liberal 


Studies Minor Area 


3 

is 


FREE 






SENIOR 



Civilization through Art II 

Core Elective 

Law Seminar II 

U.S. History Survey II 

Elective 



Junior Research Seminar 
Literature Core Elective 
Core Elective 
History of England 
American Constitutional 

Law II 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 
18 



RLS 

Liberal 
BUS 352 
POL 450 

PHI 260 



Core Elective 
Studies Minor Area 
Business Law 
Law Internship I 
Practical Logic 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



RLS Core Elective 

FREE Elective 

Liberal Studies Minor Area 

POL 451 Law Internship II 



3 

3 
6 
3 

15 



Total required for graduation: 126 credits 






THE CURRICULA 



Radiograph) Major 

Division of Allied Health Professio 

Degree: B.S. /Radiography 

Education Specialization 
Management Minor 
Management Specialization 
General Program 

Program Director: Elaine Halesey 

Freshman Year- 

(Pre-Radiography Major) 

Sophomore, Junior, Senior Years- 
(Professional Program) 



Majors Specializations and 

Certifications 

College Misericordia's program in Radiography is accredited by 
the Committee of Allied Health Education & Accreditation in 
ns conjunction with the Joint Review Committee on Education in 
Radiologic Technology as well as by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. The most recent accreditation review 
in 1987 awarded the program a five year accreditation, the 
maximum period awarded. The program provides students with 
diagnostic instruction in conjunction with practical application of 
ionizing radiation to human subjects. This instruction will 
provide students with knowledge and practical skills necessary to 
assume positions in diagnostic radiology or pursue certification in 
specialty areas as well as establish eligibility to sit for the 
American Registry of Radiologic Technologists examination in 
Radiography in the July following graduation. 



CURRICULA 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Radiography incorporates the 
College's core curriculum requirements which provide an 
extensive liberal arts foundation. Building on the broad-based 
general education, the program provides all necessary 
Radiography courses as mandated by the Joint Review 
Committee (JRC), the accrediting agency for all Radiography 
programs in the United States. 

College Misericordia provides students the opportunity to pursue 
one of three program options, which reflect the diversity of 
career paths in Radiography. All three of the curricula prepare 
students to be X-ray technicians, and no matter what option is 
chosen, all students will be enrolled in the same Radiography 
courses at the same time. 

B. S. Radiography: Specialization in Management or Minor in 

Management 

This curriculum provides students with a strong background in 

the skills and theory necessary for supervisory or administrative 

positions. 

B.S. Radiography: Specialization in Education 

This curriculum provides students with a strong background in 

the methodology and theory necessary for positions as 

Radiography instructors in hospitals or institutions of higher 

learning. 



B.S. Radiography: General Program 

This curriculum provides the identical solid education to be a 
trained radiographer as the other two curricula, but allows the 
student not interested in a managerial or instructional position 
the flexibility to pursue other areas of interest. 



^4 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

Radiography Major INTERNSHIP OPTION: 

(cont.) The internship option is an intensive experience in a particular 

area of your choice in order to gain cross-training and/or 
experience in a particular specialty area of Radiography under 
the direct supervision of a Radiographer skilled in that area. 
These areas include, but are not limited to: ultrasound, CT scan, 
nuclear medicine, MRI, cardiac catheterization, and radiation 
therapy. Upon completion of this internship, students should be 
trained in that particular area. This option allows you to gain 
experience in a specialty area in order to seek employment in 
that area (if you should choose) upon graduation. Many 
employers today are interested in radiographers who are cross- 
trained in other modalities. Students interested in a future 
management position may wish to gain first-hand experience 
working with a Radiology department manager experiencing 
such areas as staffing, budgeting, and scheduling. 

POLICIES 

In addition to the general policies of College Misericordia, the 
following regulations apply to Radiography majors: 

Clinical Placement 

Availability of clinical placements is limited. Advancement into 
the clinical setting is based upon: GPA to a large degree, as well 
as an interview with the Program Director and review by the 
entire Radiography faculty. Additional criteria are identified in 
the section on "Retention, Promotion, Graduation". Students 
will be notified of selection by June 1st, prior to the sophomore 
year. To be eligible for clinical placement, a student must have 
completed a minimum of 24 credits and have an overall GPA of 
2.5. Refer to the following section on Admission, Retention 
and Graduation Requirements for the specific details. 

For further admission criteria pertinent to the Radiography 
Program, refer to the section on admission requirements. 

Transfer Students 

Transfer students will be considered providing the criteria are 
met; however, they must follow the sequence of courses for the 
Radiography Program as listed in the catalog beginning with the 
Sophomore year. ' 

Classification of Students 

Due to the sequential nature of the Radiography curricula 
students are identified in levels, regardless of their standing 
according to the Registrar, as: 



75 



I HE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 

Certifications 

Radiograph) Major Freshman: those students enrolled in RDT 100, Freshman 

(cont.) Seminar. 

Sophomore: those students enrolled in RDT 112, Methods of 

Patient Care (Fall), and RDT 140, Clinic I (Spring). 
Junior: those students enrolled in RDT 225, Clinic III (Fall), and 

RDT 245, Clinic IV (Spring). 
Senior: those students enrolled in RDT 265, Clinic VI (Fall), and 
RDT 275, Clinic VII (Spring). 

Clinical Experience 

Once a student is selected for placement in a clinical affiliate, a 
complete set of the Policies and Procedures relating to the clinic 
will be provided and is expected to be read thoroughly by each 
student. 

Students are required to provide their own transportation to and 
from the clinical education affiliates. 

College Misericordia is currently affiliated with the following 
hospitals: Mercy Hospital, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Moses Taylor 
Hospital, Scranton, Pa.; Mercy Hospital, Scranton, Pa. and 
Geisinger-Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township, Pa. 
Additional affiliates available to the students as minor rotations 
are: Valley Radiology Associates, Inc., Kingston, Pa.; Bruno & 
Orlando Associates, Pittston, Pa.; Wyoming Valley Imaging 
Center, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Hanover Radiology, Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa., and The Cancer Center of Wyoming Valley, Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa. 

CPR Certification 

As a requirement for clinical training, students will obtain 
certification in CPR by the American Heart Association, and 
submit a copy of the current certification to the Program 
Director, prior to the start of clinical training. 

Recertification upon expiration must be obtained as long as the 
student is enrolled in any clinical experience. 

Health Examination 

As a requirement to the commencement of the clinical 
practicum, students are required to submit a physical 
examination report to the College Health Nurse prior to the 
spring semester of each year in which they plan to attend clinic. 
A complete list of required exams will be provided to all 
Radiography majors in the summer semester prior to the 
beginning of their clinical rotation. 



76 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

Radiography Major The results MUST be received by the school health nurse of 

(cont.) College Misericordia no later than December 1st of the Fall 

semester prior to Clinical Experience. Normal results are good 
for a period of 1 year. Students must submit a physical exam 
report each year prior to the spring semester year in which they 
are enrolled in a Clinical Experience. 

A portion of these tests will be required to be repeated, 
following the same procedure stated above, prior to the start of 
RDT 245, Clinical Experience IV, which begins the spring 
semester, and RDT 275, Clinical Experience VII. 

Special Expenses 

In addition to the College tuition and fees, expenses for the 
Radiography Program include: CPR certification and re- 
certification, malpractice liability insurance, uniforms, 
laboratory fees, American Registry Examination fee, health 
examination fees, and Assessment test expense (re-tests only). 

ADMISSION, RETENTION AND GRADUATION 
REQUIREMENTS 

The following policies in respect to retention, promotion, 
graduation, probation, and dismissal supersede any policy 
statements and/or information set forth in previous college 
catalogs. 

Admission into Pre-Radiography/ Radiography 

Students admitted into Radiography must meet the general 
admission requirements of College Misericordia. Admission into 
the Pre-Radiography Program as a freshman does not guarantee 
advancement into the clinical setting. 

Pre-Radiography: 

I. Current Freshman (Entering in Fall 1989 or 1990) 
Freshman Year 

Retention 

Cumulative GPA of 2.5 at the end of the spring semester. A 
GPA of 2.0-2.49 will be end considered providing clinical space 
is available; however, student will be on program PROBATION. 
(See Probation Policy) 

Promotion 

Cumulative GPA of 2.5 at end of the year. Satisfactory 
completion of all required courses. 



77 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Radiography Major Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Year 

(cont.) 



Retention 

Cumulative GPA of 2.5 at the end of the spring semester of each 
year, sophomore, junior, senior. 

Promotion 

Cumulative GPA of 2.5 end of each year. Satisfactory completion 
of all required courses. 

Additional Promotion Requirements: 

A. Required observation in a local hospital's Radiology 
Department for a minimum of either eight (8) hours in one day 
or two half-days consisting of four (4) hours each. This will 
involve a morning and an afternoon. Students may contact the 
Program Director at College Misericordia for assistance in 
arranging this experience. Documentation is required by the 
cooperating institution and must be submitted to the Program 
Director's office at College Misericordia by August 15, prior to 
the start of the sophomore year. Forms may be obtained by 
contacting the Radiography Department. 

B. Participation in the RHO TAU Club and activities. RHO 
TAU is the X-ray club of College Misericorida comprised of 
Radiography majors. Attendance at a minimum of 2/3 of the 
meetings is required. 

C. A personal interview with the Program Director of 
Radiography. 

D. Submission of medical documentation which confirms the 
student's ability to successfully fulfill all program requirements, 
mentally and physically. 

GRADUATION - Cumulative GPA of 2.5, minimum of 124 
credits, depending on the track chosen, a score at or above 74% 
on the Senior Assessment test, administered in RDT 410, Senior 
Registry Seminar and satisfactory completion of all College 
Misericordia requirements. 

PROBATION - The student will be placed on program probation 
for the following semester if any one of the following occurs: 

a. the cumulative grade point average is below the 
stipulated requirement; 

b. failure in a non-Radiography course required for 
the major: i.e., BIO 127, 128, PHY 101, 102; 

c. the student does not attain a score at or above 
the stipulated percentage on the assessment test 
administered in RDT 410. 



78 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

Radiography Major THE STUDENT WILL BE PLACED ON IMMEDIATE 

(cont.) PROBATION IF A RECORDED VIOLATION OF THE CODE 

OF ETHICS OCCURS AT ANY TIME. 

THE STUDENT WILL BE REMOVED FROM PROGRAM 
PROBATION WHEN: 

a. the stipulated cumulative grade point average is 
achieved; 

b. the terms of probation are met. 

STUDENTS CAN BE PLACED ON PROGRAM PROBATION 
ONLY ONE TIME. 

DISMISSAL 

Dismissal of the student from the Radiography Program will 
result if any one of the following occur: 

a. when any two of the retention/promotion criteria 
are not met; 

b. the student commits a "serious" infraction of the 
Code of Ethics (see Code of Ethics for 
definition); 

c. the student fails to meet the terms of probation; 

d. an infraction occurs justifying a second 
probation; 

e. the student fails any Radiography course (any 
course with an RDT code). 

II. Current Sophomores 

Retention 

A GPA of 2.5 at the end of each spring semester. 

Promotion 

A Cumulative GPA of 2.5 at the end of each year. A 
satisfactory completion of all required courses. 

GRADUATION - A Cumulative GPA of 2.5, a minimum of 
124 credits, and satisfactory completion of all College 
Misericordia requirements, including a score at or above 74% on 
the assessment test administered in RDT 410, Senior Registry 
Seminar. 

PROBATION - The student will be placed on program 
probation for the following semester if any one of the following 
occurs: 

a. the cumulative grade point average is below the 
stipulated requirement; 

b. failure in a non Radiography course required for 
the major, i.e., BIO 127, 128, PHY 101, 102; 



79 



THE CI RRICT LA 



\tajors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Radiograph) Major c. the student does not attain a score at or above the 

(cont.) stipulated percentage on the assessment test in 

RDT 410. 

A STUDENT WILL BE PLACED ON IMMEDIATE 
PROBATION IF: 

a. a recorded violation of the Code of Ethics occurs 

at any time. 

THE STUDENT WILL BE REMOVED FROM PROGRAM 
PROBATION WHEN: 

a. the stipulated cumulative grade point average is 
achieved; 

b. the terms of probation are met. 

STUDENTS CAN BE PLACED ON PROGRAM PROBATION 
ONLY ONE TIME. 

DISMISSAL 

Dismissal of the student from the Radiography program will 
result if any of the following occur: 

a. when any two of the retention/promotion criteria 
are not met; 

b. "serious" infractions of the Code of Ethics (see 
Code of Ethics for definition); 

c. the student fails to meet the terms of probation; 

d. an infraction occurs justifying a second probation; 

e. failure of any course with an RDT code. 

If a student is dismissed from the Radiography program, he/she 
will receive notification in writing, from the Program Director. 

RE-ADMISSION - Once a student is dismissed from the 
Radiography program, he/she may apply for re-admission for 
the following year. This is due to the sequential nature of the 
Radiography curricula. 

The student has the opportunity to submit a letter of intent to 
the Dean of Admissions and the Program Director of 
Radiography for re-admission into the Radiography program. 
Consideration for re-admission into the Radiography program 
will be done at the end of the spring semester. This will be based 
on an achieved GPA of 2.5, as well as successful completion of 
any and all criteria that were the cause of the initial dismissal, 
and providing clinical space is available for the Clinical 
Experience in which the student must be placed at the time of 
re-admission. Notification of re-acceptance will be in writing bj 
the Program Director prior to June 1st, or December 1st, 
depending on which semester the student is re-entering. 



Si) 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Radiography Major III. Current Juniors 

(cont.) 



Junior Year 

Retention - G.P.A. of 2.5 at end of at end of spring semester. 

Senior Year 

G.P.A. of 2.5 at end of spring semester. 

PROMOTION - 

Junior Year: Cumulative GPA of 2.5 at end of Junior year. 

Satisfactory completion of all required courses. 

Senior Year: Cumulative G.P.A. of 2.5 at end of Senior year. 

Satisfactory completion of all required courses. 

GRADUATION - Cumulative GPA of 2.5, minimum of 124 
credits, and satisfactory completion of all College Misericordia 
requirements, including a score at or above 74% on the 
assessment test administered in RDT 410, Senior Registry 
Seminar. 

PROBATION - The student will be placed on program 
probation for the following semester if any one of the following 
occurs: 

a. the cumulative grade point average is below the 
stipulated requirement; 

b. failure in a non Radiography course required for 
the major, i.e., BIO 127, 128, PHY 101, 102; 

c. the student does not attain a score at or above 
the stipulated percentage on the Assessment test, 
in RDT 410. 

THE STUDENT WILL BE PLACED ON IMMEDIATE 
PROBATION IF: 

a. a recorded violation of the Code of Ethics occurs 

at any time. 

THE STUDENT WILL BE REMOVED FROM PROGRAM 
PROBATION WHEN: 

a. the stipulated cumulative grade point average is 
achieved; 

b. the terms of probation are met. 

STUDENTS CAN BE PLACED ON PROGRAM PROBATION 
ONLY ONE TIME. 

DISMISSAL 

Dismissal of the student from the Radiography program will 
result if any of the following occur: 



81 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 

Radiograph) Major a. when any two of the retention/promotion criteria 

(cont.) are not met; 

b. "serious" infractions of the Code of Ethics (see 
Code of Ethics for definition); 

c. the student fails to meet the terms of probation; 

d. an infraction occurs justifying a second probation; 

e. failure of any course with an RDT code. 

If a student is dismissed from the Radiography program he/she 
will receive notification, in writing, from the Program Director. 

RE-ADMISSION 

Once a student is dismissed from the Radiography program he/ 
she may apply for re-admission for the following year. This is 
due to the sequential nature of the Radiography curricula. The 
student has the opportunity to submit a letter of intent to the 
Dean of Admissions and the Program Director of Radiography 
for re-admission into the Radiography program. Consideration 
for re-admission into the Radiography program will be done at 
the end of the spring semester. This will be based on an achieved 
GPA of 2.5 as well as successful completion of any and all 
criteria that resulted in the initial dismissal, and the provision 
that clinical space is available. Notification of re-acceptance will 
be in writing by the Program Director prior to June 1st, or 
December 1st, depending upon which semester the student is re- 
entering. 

IV. Current Seniors 

GRADUATION - Cumulative GPA of 2. 5, a minimum of 124 
credits, and satisfactory completion of all College Misericordia 
requirements, including a score at or above 74% on the 
assessment test administered in RDT 410, Senior Registry 
Seminar. 

PROBATION - The student will be placed on program probation 
for the next semester if: 

a. the cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or 
above at the end of the spring semester is not 
maintained. 

b. failure in a non Radiography course required for 
the major; 

c. a recorded violation of the Code of Ethics occurs 
at any time. 

THE STUDENT WILL BE REMOVED FROM PROGRAM 
PROBATION WHEN: 



82 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 

Radiography Major a. the cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or 

(cont.) above is achieved; 

b. the terms of probation are met. 

STUDENTS CAN BE PLACED ON PROGRAM PROBATION 
ONLY ONE TIME. 

DISMISSAL 

Dismissal will occur when: 

a. the student fails to meet the terms of probation 
or if the student accrues additional deficits after 
being on program probation. At this point, the 
student is automatically dismissed from the 
Radiography program. 

b. a "serious" infraction of the Code of Ethics 
occurs. 

c. failure of any course with an RDT code. 

If a student is dismissed from the Radiography program, he/she 
will receive notification, in writing, from the Program Director. 

RE-ADMISSION - Once a student is dismissed from the 
Radiography program, he/she may apply for re-admission for 
the following year. This is due to the sequential nature of the 
Radiography curricula. The student has the opportunity to 
submit a letter of intent to the Dean of Admissions and the 
Program Director of Radiography for re-admission into the 
Radiography program. Consideration for re-admission will be 
done at the end of the spring semester. This will be based on an 
achieved GPA of 2.5, as well as successful completion of all 
criteria that were the reason for the initial dismissal, and the 
provision that clinical space is available. Notification of re- 
acceptance will be in writing from the Program Director prior 
to June 1st or December 1st, depending upon which semester 
the student is re-entering. 

The Radiography department of College Misericordia reserves 
the right to make changes in these policies providing the need 
arises. 



8.1 



THE CURRKTLA 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



Radiograph} Major 

(cont.) 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 

GENF.RAL PROGRAM 
FRES1 [MAN 



Introduction to 

Computing: BASIC 
American Nat'l Gov't 
Core Elective 
Statistics 
PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 



RDT 117 Positioning II 

RDT 118 Positioning Lab II 

RDT 120 Rad Technique I 

RDT 140 Clinic I 

BIO 128 Anatomy/Physiology II 

RDT 210 Sophmore Registry Seminar 

FA 201 Civilization through Art II 



RDT 100 


Freshman Seminar 





CPS100 


SOC110 


Anthropology 


3 




ENG 103 


Composition 


3 


POL 100 


HIS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS 


MTH 


Math Bank I 


3 


MTH 115 


FREE 


Elective 


3 
15 


PSY 123 






SOPHMORE 



RDT 106 Medical Terminology 1 

RDT 1 12 Methods of Patient Care 2 

RDT 115 Positioning I 4 

RDT 116 Positioning Lab I 1 

BIO 127 Anatomy /Physiology I 4 

FA 201 Civilization through An I 3 

15 



SUMMER 



RDT 155 Clinic II 



RDT 122 Rad Technique II 2 

RDT 215 Rad Bio Protection 3 

RDT 225 Clinic III 2 

RDT 290 Intro to Cross-Sec-Anatomy3 

PHY 101 Rad Physics I 3 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 3 



JUNIOR 

RDT 221 Special Procedures 

RDT 245 Clinic rv 

RDT 247 Pathology 

RDT 310 Junior Registry Seminar 

RDT 448 Quality Control 

PHY 102 Rad Physics II 

PHL 222 Medical Ethics 



16 
SUMMER 

RDT 255 Clinic V (Internship or Minor Rotation Option) 

SENIOR 



3 
3 

3 

3 
3 
15 



2 
3 
1 

3 
3 
3 
15 



RDT 265 


Clinic VI 




2 


RDT 275 


Clinic VII 


2 


RDT 410 


Senior Registry 







ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core 


Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 




3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


FREE 


Elective 




3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


FREE 


Elective 




3 

14 






14 



Total required for graduation 124 credits 



84 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



Radiography Major 

(cont.) 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 

Specialization in Education - 19 credits 
FRESHMAN 



POL 100 Amer. Nafl Gov't 3 

3 CPS 100 Intro to Computing: BASIC 3 



RDT 100 Freshman Seminar 
SED 100 Exceptional Children 
EDU 100 Educational Foundations 
MTH Math Bank I 
HIS Core Elective 

ENG 103 Composition 



RDT 106 Medical Terminology 

RDT 112 Methods of Patient Care 

RDT 115 Positioning I 

RDT 116 Positioning Lab I 

BIO 127 Anatomy & Physiology I 4 RDT 210 Sophomore Registry Seminar 



3 MTH 115 Statistics 

3 SOC 110 Anthropology 

3 HIS Core Elective 

3 
15 


3 
3 
3 


15 


SOPHOMORE 




1 RDT 117 Positioning II 

2 RDT 118 Positioning Lab II 
4 RDT 120 Rad Technique I 

1 RDT 140 Clinic I 


2 

1 



EDU 220 Basic Methods 



1.5 BIO 128 Anatomy & Physiology II 



FA 201 Civilization through Art I 3 FA 201 Civilization through Art II 

16.5 



14 



RDT 155 Clinic II 



SUMMER 



RDT 122 Rad Technique II 

RDT 215 Rad Bio Protection 

RDT 225 Clinic III 

RDT 290 Intro Cross-Sec-Anatomy 

EDU 327 School Law 

PHY 101 Rad Physics I 



2 
3 

2 

3 
1 
3 

14 



JUNIOR 

RDT 221 Special Procedures 

RDT 245 Clinic IV 

RDT 247 Pathology 

RDT 310 Junior Registry Seminar 

EDU 221 Science Methods 

PHY 102 Rad Physics II 

RDT 448 Quality Control 



2 
3 
1 

1.5 
3 
3 
13.5 



SUMMER 
RDT 255 Clinic V (Internship or Minor Rotation option) 

SENIOR 



RDT 265 Clinic VI 2 

ENG Literature Core Elective 3 

RLS Core Elective 3 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images 3 

EDU 200 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 3 



L7 



RDT 275 Clinic VII 2 

ENG Literature Core Elective 3 

RLS Core Elective 3 

PHL 222 Medical Ethics 3 

EDU 224 Health Methods 3 

PSY 275 Child/Adolescent Psychology 3 

RDT 410 Senior Registry Seminar 

17 



Total required for graduation: 128 credits 



THE CURRICULA 



85 



Radiograph) Major 

(cont.) 



Majors. Specializations and 
Certifications 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 

Specialization in Management - 18 credits Minor in Management - 21 credits 



FRESHMAN 



RDT 100 Freshman Seminar 
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 
BUS 205 Macroeconomics 

MTH Math Bank I 
ENG 103 Composition 



HIS 



Core Elective 



CPS 100 Intro to Computing: BASIC 
BUS 206 Microecononmics (Minor)' 
OR Core "(Specialization) 
MTH 115 Statistics 
SOC110 Anthropology 



3 HIS 
15 



Core Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



SOPHMORE 



RDT 106 Medical Terminology 1 

RDT 112 Methods of Patient Care 2 

RDT 115 Positioning I 4 

RDT 116 Positioning Lab I 1 



RDT 117 Positioning II 
RDT 118 Positioning Lab II 
RDT 120 Rad Technique I 
RDT 140 Clinic I 



BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 3 RDT 210 Sophomore Registry Seminar 
FA 201 Civilization through Art I 3 FA 202 Civilization through Art II 3 



BIO 127 Anatomy/Physiology I 



4 BIO 128 Anatomy/Physiology II 
18 



14 



RDT 155 Clinic II 



SUMMER 



JUNIOR 



RDT 122 Rad Technique II 2 

RDT 215 Rad Bio Protection 3 

RDT 225 Clinic III 2 

RDT 290 Intro to Cross-Sec-Anatomy3 

PHY 101 Rad Physics I 3 

PHL 101 Contemporary Self Images _3 



16 



RDT 221 Special Procedures 

RDT 245 Clinic IV 

RDT 247 Pathology 

RDT 310 Jr. Registry Seminar 

RDT 448 Quality Control 

PHY 102 Rad Physics II 

PHL 222 Medical Ethics 



2 
3 
1 

3 
3 
3 
15 



* Bus 206 is the additional course required for a 
Management Minor. 

•' students pursuing a minor in Management 
schedule Business 206 Microeconomics in Spring 
of freshman year. Students pursuing a 
specialization take PSY 123 Introduction to 
Psychology during freshman year. 



SUMMER 

RDT 255 Clinic V (Internship or Minor Rotation option) 



RDT 265 Clinic VI 

RDT 410 Senior Registry Seminar 

ENG Literature Core Elective 

RDT 445 Radiology Mgl 

BUS 371 Business Financial Mgl. 

RLS Core Elective 



SENIOR 



Total required for graduation 



Clinic VII : 

Introduction to Psych" 3 

Literature Core Elective 3 

American Natl ( I 3 

Human Relations Mgl. 3 

Core Elective 3 

(minor) 17 

(spec.) 14 
130 credits = Minor in Management 

127 credits = Specialization in Mjnjgemcnt 



2 


RDT 275 





PSY 123 


3 


ENG 


3 


POL 100 


3 


BUS 390 


3 


RLS 


14 





S6 



THE CURRICULA 



Radiography Clinical Associates 
Major Affiliates 



Geisinger-Wyoming Valley Medical Center 

Plains Twp., PA 
Michele Dillon, R.T.(R) 

Mercy Hospital 

Wilkes-Barre, PA 

Bob Greene, B.S.R.T.(R) 



Mercy Hospital 

Scranton, PA 

Barbara Forconi, R.T.(R) 

Moses Taylor Hospital 

Scranton, PA 

Amelia Antoniacci, R.T.(R) 



Minor Affiliates 



Bruno & Orlando M.D. Associates 

Pittston, PA 

Patricia McGarry, R.T.(R) 

Cancer Center of Wyoming Valley 

Wilkes-Barre, PA 

Paulette Valvano,B.S.,R.T.(R) 

Hanover Radiology 

Wilkes-Barre, PA 
Rose Baron, R.T.(R) 



Valley Radiology Associates, Inc. 

Kingston PA 

Helen Cragle, R.T. (R) 

Wyoming Valley Imaging Center 
Wilkes-Barre, PA 
Len Trolio, R.T.(R) 



Adjunct Faculty 



Geisinger-Wyoming Valley Medical Center, 

Plains Twp., PA 

S. David Weston, M.D. - Director of Radiography 

Howard L. Spector, D.O. - Associate Radiologist 

Nathaniel H. Wiesenfeld, M.D. Assistant Director of Radiology 

Thomas M. Yarnel, Ph.D., M.D. Associate Radiologist 

Mercy Hospital 

Wilkes-Barre, PA 

Salvatore M. Imperiale, M.D. - Director of Radiology 

Juan Gaia, M.D. - Associate Radiologist 

Champak Dedhia, M.D. - Associate Radiologist 

Warren Goldfeder, M.D. - Associate Radiologist 

Arthur Liss, M.D. - Associate Radiologist 



Moses Taylor Hospital 

Scranton, PA 

James L. Sundheim, M.D. 



Director of Radiology 



THE CURRICULA 



87 



School Nurse 
Certification 

The School Nurse certification program at 
College Misericordia meets the 
requirements for Pennsylvania School 
Nurse certification. 

A minimum of 15 credits of the 
certification program must be taken at 
College Misericordia. 



RN with a BSN (Accredited Program) 

The certification program is a 24.5 credit 
curriculum which meets the requirements 
for Pennsylvania School Nurse 
Certification. 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 

RN/BSN 

EDU 100 Educational Foundations 

EDU 200 Educational Psychology 

EDU 220 Basic Methods 

EDU 224 Health Methods 

PSY 275 Child & Adolescent Psychology 

SOC321 The Family 

SOC221 Cultural Minorities 

NSG 484 Practicum for School Nurse Certification 



3 

3 

1.5 

3 

3 

3 

3 

5 

24.5 



Through a sequence of courses in 
Education, Psychology, Nursing and 
Sociology, BSN credentialed nurses are 
prepared to meet the health needs of 
school students of all ages. The program 
requires 5 credits in Nursing, including a 
School Nurse practicum. 

BSN graduates who apply to College 
Misericordia for School Nurse 
Certification follow the suggested course 
sequence. BSN graduates may request 
transfer of credits for courses required in 
the Certification sequence through 
equivalence as determined by the 
Registrar. 



RN/Non-nursing Degree 

EDU 100 Educational Foundations 

EDU 200 [Educational Psychology 

EDU 220 Basic Methods 

EDU 224 Health Methods 

PSY 275 Child & Adolescent Psychology 

SOC321 The Family 

SOC 221 Cultural Minorities 

NSG 484 Practicum for School Nurse Certification 

NSG 485 Community Health Nursing Concepts 

NSG 486 Application of Community 

Health Concepts 
NSG 487 Community Health Clinical 



3 
3 

1.5 
3 
3 
3 
3 
5 

1.5 

1.5 

2 

29.5 



RN with a Non-nursing Baccalaureate 
Degree 



A registered Nurse with a bachelor's 
degree may transfer credits for courses 
required in the Certification sequence 
through equivalence as determined by the 
Registrar. In addition to the required 
Education, Psychology and Sociology 
courses and the School Nurse practicum 
(NSG 484) candidates must complete the 
Community/Theory courses which total 5 
credits. 
Maximum credits = 29.5. 



88 



THE CURRICULA 



Majors, Specializations and 
Certifications 



Social Work Major 

Division of Professional Studies 
Degree: B.S. /Social Work 
Program Director: Dennis Fisher 



The objective of College Misericordia's 
social work program is to provide students 
with knowledge, skills, and a value 
orientation needed to practice social work 
at the baccalaureate level. To this end, the 
program offers an integrated body of 
knowledge, both theoretical and practical. 
Field instruction experience provides a 
means of utilizing this knowledge. 

Field instruction is offered in a variety of 
settings, including both public and 
voluntary agencies. It is a structured 
educational experience in social work 
practice which enables students to 
integrate the information learned in the 
classroom. Students learn about the 
structure and operation of social work 
agencies and become oriented to actual 
practice situations. 

Before students may enroll in field 
instruction they must have successfully 
completed a sequence of social work 
courses and have a grade point average of 
2.0. Transportation to and from field 
placements is the student's responsibility. 

College Misericordia's social work 
program is accredited by the Council on 
Social Work Education. Graduates may be 
eligible for advanced standing in 
numerous graduate schools of social work 
throughout the country. 



SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 



FRESHMAN 



BIO 103 


General Biology I 


3 


BIO 104 


General Biology II 


3 


PSY 123 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


SOC 122 


Social Problems 


3 


SOC 110 


Anthropology 


3 


POL 100 


American Nat'l Gov't 


3 


HIS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS 


Core Elective 


3 


ENG 103 


Composition 


3 
15 


MTH 


Math Bank I 


3 

15 




i 


SOPHOMORE 






SWK 103 


Community Service 


3 


SWK 252 


Social Welfare Policies 
& Services 


3 


SWK251 


Introduction to Social 




MTH 115 Statistics 


3 




Welfare 


3 








SWK 285 


Communication Skills 


3 


SOC 221 


Cultural Minorities 


3 


SOC 321 


The Family 


3 


FREE 


Elective 


3 


FA 201 


Civilization through Art I 


3 

15 


FA 202 


Civilization through Art II 


3 

15 






JUNIOR 






SWK 232 


Research Methods 


3 


SWK 354 


SWK Methods 




SWK 353 


SWK Methods 






and Processes II 


3 




and Processes I 


3 


SWK 


Elective 


3 


SWK 371 


Field Instruction I 


3 


PSY 334 


Maladaptive Behavior 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core Elective 


3 


SWK 472 


Field Instruction 
Seminar I 


1 


PHL 101 


Contemporary Self Images 


3 


HIS 272 


Alternate Social Systems 


3 
16 






15 






SENIOR 







SWK 475 Field Instruction II 3 

SWK 473 Field Instruction II Seminarl 

RLS Core Elective 3 

PHL Core Elective 3 

FREE Elective 3 

SWK Elective 3 

16 



SWK 452 Adaptive Behavior 

SWK 474 Field Instruction Seminar III 

RLS Core Elective 

SWK 476 Field Instruction III 

Free Elective 

SWK Elective 



Total required for graduation: 123 credits 






THE CURRICULA 
Minor Programs 



Minors are focused programs of study which involve specific clusters 
of courses around a general area of study. Minors are not associated 
with any particular degree program and are therefore open to all 
interested students. 



Accounting Minor 

Division of Business Administration 

The accounting minor provides a strong analytical 
base for almost any major. This program will 
enable students to apprehend data, analyze it, 
systematize it, and portray it. With the increased 
concentration in accounting computerized systems, 
computer science majors will find this minor 
attractive. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 3 

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ACC 201 Intermediate Accounting I 3 

ACC 202 Intermediate Accounting II 3 

ACC 301 Advanced Accounting I 3 

ACC 302 Advanced Accounting II 3 

One (1) Course Selected from the following: 



ACC 310 Cost Accounting 


(3) 




ACC 311 Managerial Accounting 


(3) 




ACC 410 Auditing 


(3) 




ACC 401 Taxes 1 


(3) 




ACC 402 Taxes II 


(3) 






Total: 


21 credits 



Biology Minor 

Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

The minor in biology may be pursued by any 
student with an interest in the natural sciences. 
The 19-20 credit curriculum offers broad 
background in the origin, growth, structure and 
reproduction of living matter in its varied forms. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

BIO 101 General Botany and Biological Principles 4 



BIO 102 Zoology 

BIO 251 Comparative Anatomy and 

Histotechnique I 
BIO 241 Genetics 

One (1) course selected from the following : 



BIO 322 Comparative Embryology 

of Vertebrates 
BIO 343 General Microbiology 
BIO 346 General Physiology 



(3) 
(4) 
(4) 
Total: 19-20 credits 



Chemistry Minor 

Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

An understanding of chemistry can be 
advantageous to a liberally educated individual in a 
highly technological society. Students who major in 
biology, nursing, occupational therapy or 
radiography may find the chemistry minor 
particularly appropriate. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

CUM 133 Chemical Principles I 
CHM 134 Chemical Principles II 
CUM 243 Organic Chemistry I 
CHM 244 Organic Chemistry II 

One(l) course selected from the following: 

( ll\1 343 Physical Chemistry I 

OR 
CHM 353 Biochemistry 



(4) 

(3) 

Total: 19-20 credits 



<>l) 



THE CURRICULA 

Minor Programs 



Computer Science Minor 

Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

In today's electronic world, a background in 
computer science is a highly marketable asset. 
The computer science minor may supplement 
a major in any other field, depending on the 
student's interests and career objectives. 
Business administration, education, 
mathematics and social work majors frequently 
follow the minor program in computer science. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

CPS 101 Introduction to Programming: Pascal 3 

CPS 121 Computer Programming 3 



Two (2) courses selected from: 

CPS 221 Computer Systems 
CPS 222 Computer Organization 
CPS 231 File Processing 

Nine (9) additional credits in 
approved upper division computer 
science courses 



(3) 
(3) 

(41 



Total: 21-22 credits 



English Minor 

Division of Humanities 

The study of English provides students with a 
comprehensive knowledge of the language and 
its literature. Students in any major program 
can apply the skills learned through the English 
minor to both personal and professional goals. 
The minor emphasizes an understanding of 
literary forms and the clear articulation of 
ideas in writing. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 



Choose a literature sequence: 








ENG 221 Major British Writers I 


(3) 






ENG 222 Major British Writers II 


(3) 






OR 








ENG 247 American Literature I 


(3) 






ENG 248 American Literature II 


(3) 






OR 








ENG 266 Western World Literature I 


(31 






ENG 267 Western World Literature II 


(3) 






Choose a writing course: 








ENG 105 Research Paper 


(3) 






OR 








ENG 203 Advanced Expository Writing 


(3) 






Nine (9) credits of Advanced 








Literature Electives 










Total: 


18 


credits 



Gerontology Minor 

Division of Professional Studies 

As the study of aging in today's society, 
gerontology has direct applications to a 
number of major fields of study. Gerontology 
is most often associated with the helping 
professions, including nursing, occupational 
therapy, and social work. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

GER 241 Introduction to Social Gerontology 
GER 375 Aging Policies and Programs 

Three (3) courses selected from the following: 



GER 276 Psychology of Aging 

GER 292 Older Women 

GER 304 Nutrition and Aging 

GER 306 Health and Physiology of Aging 

GER 341 Substance Abuse and the Aged 

GER 358 Counseling the Older Adult 

GER 392 Seminar 

GER 410 Adult Protective Services 

GER 413 Gerontology Cooperative Education 

GER 470 Practicum 

GER 480 Independent Study 



(3) 
(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3-12) 

(3) 

(1-3) 

Total: 15 credits 



THK CI RKICl LA 

Minor Programs 



91 



History Minor 

Division of Humanities 

The study of history has been one of mankind's 
most favored pursuits since the beginning of 
recorded time. The history minor may he taken in 
conjunction with any degree progTam to broaden 
one's world perspective, foster critical judgement, 
cultivate the ability to reason, and develop 
intellectual growth. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

Choose one survey sequence: 

HIS 101 History of Western Civilization I 

HIS 102 History of Western Civilization II 

OR 
HIS 103 United States Survey to 1900 
HIS 104 United States Survey Since 1900 
Plus: 
Twelve (12) credits of Advanced History Electives 



(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 



Total: 18 credits 



Management Minor 

Division of Business Administration 

An understanding of management styles and 
techniques can benefit anyone who will be involved 
in organization life. Opportunities and 
advancement in one's chosen field will often be 
enhanced by documented study of the skills 
required for success. This minor is well suited to 
indiwduals in anv area of endeavor. 



Marketing Minor 

Division of Business Administration 

An understanding of Marketing can benefit a 
person who will be involved in exchanging with 
private, public, profit, or not-for-profit 
organizations. Opportunities in the field of 
Marketing are broadening every year, and this 
minor is well suited to students in any area of 
interest. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II 
BUS 208 Principles of Management 
BUS 300 Quantitative Methods I 
BUS 390 Human Relations Management 

Two (2) courses selected from the following: 

ACC 311 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 382 Personnel & Industrial Relations 

BUS 385 Production & Operations 

Management 
BUS 420 Small Business Management 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II 

BUS 208 Principles of Management 

BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 

BUS 303 Sales and Sales Management 

Select two (2) courses from the following: 

BUS 263 Advertising and Sales Promotion 

BUS 226 Principles of Retailing 

BUS 440 Marketing Management 

BUS 450 Marketing Research 



(3) 
(3) 

(3) 
(3) 
Total: 



21 credits 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
Total: 21 credits 



Mathematics Minor 

Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

The computer revolution and the growing reliance 
on statistics and quantitative research have 
broadened the application of mathematical 
principles. The physical sciences, as well as the 
behavioral and social sciences fields, have need for 
individuals with experience in mathematics. The 
minor program in mathematics exposes students to 
both classical and contemporary mathematical 
techniques. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

MTH 151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 
MTH 152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 
MTH 215 Mathematical Statistics 

Four (4) courses selected from the following: 

MTH 225 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 

MTH 241 Linear Algebra 

MTH 242 Differential Equations 

MTH 244 Set Theory and Logic 

MTH 351 Geometry 

MTH 353/354 Abstract Algebra 

MTH 341/342 Principles of Analysis 



(4) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3)/(3) 

(3)/(3) 

Total: 21-22 credits 



92 



THE CURRICULA 

Minor Programs 



Philosophy Minor 

Division of Humanities 

The minor program in philosophy offers 
students the opportunity for intellectual 
liberation and refinement. The 18-credit 
curriculum explores philosophical problems 
from a variety of standpoints, fosters critical 
judgement, refines convictions, promotes the 
search for truth and encourages acceptance of 
many different modes of thought. 





COURSE SEQUENCE 




PHL 101 


Contemporary Self-images 


3 


PHL225 


Ethics 


3 


PHL 257 


Philosophy of Religion 


3 


PHL 260 


Practical Logic 


3 


PHL 290 


Philosophy of Person 


3 


Choose: 


Elective Course 
OR 


3 


PHL 480 


Independent Study 


3 




Total: 


18 credits 



Political Science Minor 

Division of Humanities 

The political science minor offers students 
interested in law, politics or government a 
useful foundation in these areas. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 



POL 100 


American National Government 


3 


POL 251 


Law Seminar I 


3 


POL 252 


Law Seminar II 


3 


POL 315 
POL 405 


Elective 

American Constitutional Law I 


3 
3 


POL 406 


American Constitutional Law II 


3 


POL 480 


Independent Study 

Total: 


3 
21 credits 



Psychology Minor 

Division of Professional Studies 

The psychology minor can be a meaningful 
adjunct to any major, but is especially pertinent 
to the study and practice of education, nursing, 
occupational therapy, business administration, 
and social work. Focusing on the origins, 
development, modification, and implications of 
human behavior, the study of psychology has 
numerous applications to personal and 
professional life. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 



PSY 123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


PSY 232 


Research Methods 


3 


PSY 275 


Child and Adolescent Psychology 


3 


PSY 334 


Maladaptive Behavior 


3 


PSY 


Elective 


3 




Total: 


15 credits 



Religious Studies Minor 

Division of Humanities 

The religious studies curriculum acquaints 
students with the richness of religious 
experience. The program explores the origins 
of Christianity, its doctrinal development, and 
offers a foundation for making ethical 
decisions. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 



RLS 100 


Biblical Studies 


3 


RLS103 


Moral Theology 


3 


RLS 104 


World Religions 


3 


RLS 106 


Theology and Human Experience 


3 


RLS 113 


Theology of the Church 


3 


RLS 


Elective 


3 




Total: 


18 credits 



93 



THE Cl'RRK'l LA 

Minor Programs 



Writing Minor 

Division of Humanities 

The writing minor provides students with a variety 
of experiences in the written expression of ideas. 
The program is based on the correct and effective 
use of the language and offers both creative and 
practical application of writing skills. 



COURSE SEQUENCE 

ENG 103 Composition 3 

ENG 105 The Research Paper 3 

ENG 203 Advanced Expository Writing 3 

ENG 318 The Study of Language 3 

Six (6) credits of elective courses selected from the following: 



ENG 112 


Speech Communication 


(3) 


ENG 339 Technical Writing 


(3) 


ENG 341 


Imaginative Writing 


(3) 


ENG 343 


Writing for Media 


(3) 


ENG 470 


Internship 


(3-6) 




Internship may be taken for 3-6 




credits and involves practical 






experience writing for local 






newspapers, public relations 






offices, etc. 




CPS 101 


Introduction to 






Programming: Pascal 


(3) 



Total: 18 credits 



94 



THE CURRICULA 

Elective Areas of Study 



Elective courses provide a variety of experiences in the liberal arts and may 
be taken by any interested student whose curriculum allows for such electives. 

The elective areas of study are not related to any specific degree program, that 
is, one cannot pursue a major, minor, specialization or certification in any of 
the programs as they are described in this section. However, coursework in 
these areas can contribute significantly to a student's education. Some of the 
courses in each of the following programs are called for in the course sequence 
of various majors. Others are part of the College's core curriculum. 

Descriptions of the courses offered in the elective areas of study may be found 
under the section headed Course Descriptions. 



Psychology 



The study of Psychology encourages the student to develop a broad 
understanding of his/her own behavior as well as that of others. An enhanced 
appreciation of individual motivation, individual differences, and 
interpersonal dynamics enables students to become more perceptive in work 
and life situations. Varied courses in this area would prove a valuable 
complement to any major. 



Religious Studies 



As an integral part of the Liberal Studies curriculum at College Misericordia, 
the Religious Studies program offers special elective courses. These courses 
are intended to enrich the students' professional competencies as well as 
widen their academic goals to include a variety of studies in religious 
experience and theological development. 



Science 



The discipline of studying Science as an elective area can strengthen a 
student's ability to objectively observe situations and cautiously formulate 
approaches to problems in a systematic fashion. Options that exist within this 
area include courses in biology, physics, and chemistry. 



Sociology 



Sociology is the study of the origin, development, organization and 
functioning of human society. No one exists outside of a social system, so it 
is easy to understand how sociology can relate to any academic program. 

The courses offered by the sociology program explore such subjects as 
anthropology, social problems, cultural minorities, the family, and research 
methods. A background in sociology can broaden one's perspective of the 
world, can promote objectivity, and develop an accepting attitude with regard 
to different peoples and and their ways of life. 



95 



COl'RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ACCOl'NTING (ACC) 



101 Principles of Accounting I 3 credits 

An introduction to basic accounting principles, concepts, and 
procedures. Topics include the accounting cycle; preparation of 
financial statements; accounting systems and special-purpose 
journals; internal control methods; inventory costing; short-term 
liquid assets. Weekly projects are completed using a mainframe 
computer system. 
Fall 



102 Principles of Accounting II 3 credits 

A continuation of basic accounting principles, concepts and 
procedures with emphasis on partnerships and corporations. 
Topics include financial statement analysis; depreciation methods; 
manufacturing accounting; cost and budget analysis. Students 
simulate various business accounting transactions using 
microcomputers. 
Prerequisite: ACC 101. Spring 

201 Intermediate Accounting I 4 credits 
An in-depth study and analysis of items on the balance sheet, as 
well as discussions dealing with contemporary accounting issues. 
Various problems are solved with the aid of a microcomputer. 
Prerequisite: ACC 102. Fall 

202 Intermediate Accounting II 4 credits 
This second semester course focuses on the income statement and 
the statement of financial changes in financial position. In 
addition, stockholders equity, income taxes, pension costs, leases 
and financial statement analysis are examined in detail. Financial 
theory and practice cases are studied. A computer-assisted 
practice set is completed using a microcomputer to review and 
update topics discussed in principles of accounting and 
intermediate accounting. 

Prerequisite: ACC 201. Spring 

301 Advanced Accounting I 3 credits 

A comprehensive review and analysis of the fundamentals of 
consolidated financial statements. Specific topics include branch 
accounting, the purchase and pooling of interest methods of 
accounting, and intercompany transfers. Students solve various 
consolidation problems with the assistance of an electronic 
spreadsheet consolidations template on the microcomputer. 
Prerequisite: ACC 202 or consent of instructor. Fall 



302 Advanced Accounting II 3 credits 

An in-depth study of partnerships and their formation through to 
liquidation; government and nonprofit organizations accounting, 
including discussions of G.AAPR's new terminology and 
techniques; estates, trusts and installment sales. 
Prerequisite: ACC 202 or consent of instructor. Spring 
(ACC 302 may be taken before ACC 301) 



96 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ACCOUNTING (ACC) 310 Cost Accounting 3 credits 

A study of the broad range of cost concepts includes job order 
costing, process costing, accounting for materials, labor, and the 
allocation of factory overhead standard costs, variance analysis, 
and accounting for joint-products and by-products. A 
computerized practice set covering the product cost cycle in a 
manufacturing operation using a job order cost system is 
assigned. 
Prerequisite: ACC 102. Fall 

311 Managerial Accounting 3 credits 

Uses of accounting data in planning and controlling business 
activities. Capital budgeting, inventory management, segmental 
reporting and regression analysis are some of the topics 
discussed. Preparation and analysis of financial statements will 
be emphasized. Microcomputer applications are utilized. 
Prerequisite: ACC 102. Spring 

321 Advanced Managerial Accounting 3 credits 

A continued study of selected accounting techniques required in 
compiling and interpreting accounting data to be used in 
planning, control, and managerial decisions made within the 
business organization. 
Prerequisite: ACC 311. Fall 

401 Taxes 3 credits 

The analysis and preparation of federal and state income tax 
returns based on current tax law. Tax planning is also stressed. 
A tax planner software program is utilized on a microcomputer 
that will provide the user with the ability to do "what if' tax 
planning applications. 
Prerequisite: ACC 102 or consent of instructor. Fall 

402 Taxes II 3 credits 

The analysis and preparation of federal and state corporation, 
partnership, and fiduciary tax returns based on current tax law. 
Tax consequences of the formation, operation and liquidation of 
the various forms of a corporation will be discussed in-depth. 
Prerequisite: ACC 102 or consent of instructor. Spring 

410 Auditing 3 credits 

A systematic evaluation of generally accepted accounting 
principles and applicable auditing principles, standards and 
procedures. Other topics include the study and evaluation of 
internal control, verification of account balances, professional 
ethics, and statistical sampling. Case studies are completed 
using a mainframe computer system. 
Prerequisite: ACC 102 or consent of instructor. Fall 



97 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ACCOLNTIM, (ACC) 



420 Fund Accounting 3 credits 

A study of the unique requirements of the not-for-profit 
organization for Accounting and Financial Statement Disclosure. 
Close examination of current literature will provide the student 
with an in-depth understanding of current reporting requirements 
and the positions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board 
and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. 
Prerequisite: ACC 202. Spring 



•472 Accounting Internship 1 - 15 credits 

These credits provide on-the-job accounting experience for 
accounting majors with either a public accounting firm, 
government agency, or private industry. Internships will be 
offered on a competitive basis following student interviews with 
prospective companies. The internship will begin the first 
Monday in January and continue for the entire semester. 
Accounting internships are reserved for Accounting majors in 
their senior year who have completed all major course work. 
Fall/Spring 

•480 Independent Study 3 credits 

Special investigation, with the assistance of a faculty member, of 
a selected topic of interest. Approval of Division Chair required. 
Fall/Spring/Summer 

485 Special Topics in Accounting 3 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and are announced with 
preregistration information. 
Fall/Spring 

Directed Study 



When a student must take a specific course in a particular 
semester but it is not offered in that semester, the student may 
petition for a directed study. Further rules governing the use of 
this opportunity are discussed elsewhere in this catalog. Approval 
of Division Chair and Academic Dean required. 
Fall/Spring/Summer 



98 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ADDICTIONS COUNSELING (ADC) 



222 Drug Pharmacology 3 credits 

A comprehensive understanding of drug pharmacology and its effect 
on the user. The course will include examination of such topics as 
classifications of drugs, synergistic effects of drugs on the body, drug 
tolerance and dependence, and the over-the-counter pharmaceutical 
industry. 
Fall 

333 Substance Abuse in the Adolescent Population 3 credits 

A study of the special problems of the adolescent substance abuser. 
Correlates which add impetus to the progression of the problem will 
be examined. Emphasis will be on early identification and detection 
as key components in initiating intervention strategies. 
Fall, every other year 

335 Substance Abuse in Special Populations 3 credits 

A multi-faceted look at the myriad of special populations affected 
by substance abuse. Emphasis will be on cross-cultural influences and 
the role they play in contributing to substance abuse. 
Spring 

33 7 Substance Abuse Treatment Methods 3 credits 

An examination and critique of the many treatment resources and 
methods which have been developed during the last twenty years. 
Discussion will include but not be limited to such treatment methods 
as psychotherapy with individuals and groups, drug therapy, family 
and network therapy, detoxification, and behavioral therapy. 
Spring 

339 Substance Abuse and Criminality 3 credits 

An examination of the correlation between substance abuse and 
criminality. This course will analyze the theoretical models of the 
substance abuse/crime relationship and its societal implications. 
Topics to be explored will include drugs and street crime, DUI, 
interdiction strategies, urinalysis testing, and substance abuse and 
family violence. 
Summer, every other year 

340 Alcoholism 3 credits 

An introduction to the diagnosis and treatment of alcoholism. 
Emphasis is placed on contemporary beliefs and attitudes toward 
alcohol, effects upon the family and implications for treatment. 
Summer, every other year 

341 Substance Abuse and the Aged 3 credits 

Focuses on the use patterns, diagnosis and treatment methods specific 
to the aged substance abuser. Issues examined will include misuse and 
abuse of prescription drugs, behavior and risk factors, factors related 
to undcrdiagnosis, and relationship to depression and suicide. 
Fall, every other year 



99 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



-XRl(ART) 101 Principles of Design 3 credits 

Principles and elements of design applied to problems requiring 
primarily two-dimensional solutions. Varied use of media. 

103 Drawing and Composition 3 credits 

Drawing skills developed through the use of various media. 
Right brain perception and composition in sketching is stressed. 

161 Art Appreciation 3 credits 

A survey of art from primitive to modern times. 

225 Ceramics I 3 credits 

Processes in handbuilt and wheelthrown pottery developed. 
Various glazing and decorating techniques studied. 



100 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



BIOLOGY (BIO) 101 General Botany and Biological Principles 4 credits 

Introductory principles of biology and a study of the plant 
kingdom from thallophytes to spermatophytes. Field studies of 
local plant communities. Introduction to plant anatomy, taxonomy 
and ecology. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall 

102 General Zoology 4 credits 

Zoological principles and their implications in the animal 
kingdom. Ecological and evolutionary tendencies of major 
vertebrate and invertebrate groups with consideration of anatomy 
and physiology of representatives. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Spring 

103/104 General Biology 3 credits each 

The study of the fundamental principles and modern theories of 
biology. Emphasis on the value of biology in relation to humans. 
Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall/Spring 

127 Anatomy and Physiology 4 credits 

An introduction to the human body and a detailed study of 
selected body systems with particular emphasis on the structure, 
functions and development of the skeletal and articular systems. 

127 Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall 

128 Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Spring 

128 Anatomy and Physiology 3 credits 
A study of the structure and functions of the human body. A 
continuation of Biology 127. Spring 

205 Anatomy and Physiology 3 credits 

A study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Spring 

211/212 Anatomy and Physiology 4 credits each 

A detailed study of the structure and function of the human 
body. Emphasis on physiology phenomena and concepts. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall/Spring 

227 Bacteriology 4 credits 

General morphology and physiology of bacteria, yeasts, molds and 
viruses. Study of infection and immunity. Special studies of 
foods, water and sewage with reference to health and sanitation. 
Lecture: 3hours. Laboratory: 2hours. Fall/Spring 

241 Genetics 4 credits 

A detailed study of the principles of heredity. Both molecular and 
classical genetics are covered in depth. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall 



101 



COURSE DESC RIPTIONS 



BIOLOGY (BIO) 243 General Microbiology 4 credits 

Fundamental principles and techniques of microbiology, 
including general morphology, ecology and physiology of micro- 
organisms, methods of study, identification, destruction and 
control. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Spring 

251/252 Comparative Anatom> and Mistotechnique 4/4 credits 

An integral study of the tissues, organs and systems of the 
human compared to those of selected vertebrates. Laboratory 
dissection and tissue preparation for microscopic study. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: BIO 102 or 104. Fall/Spring 

322 Comparathe Embryology of Yertebrates 3 credits 

A comprehensive study of the development of the vertebrates. 
Lecture: 2hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 251, BIO 241. 
Spring, even years (1990, 1992, etc.) 

346 General Physiology 4 credits 

A detailed study of the function of the muscular, nervous, 
endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory and excretory systems. 
Laboratory experiments deal with the physiology of humans and 
lower vertebrates. 

Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 
Prerequisites: BIO 251, CHEM 134 Spring 

360 Immunology 1 credit 

Fundamentals of immunology including innate and adaptive 
immunity, inflammatory response, antibod\ -mediated and cell- 
mediated immunity. 
Pre-requisites: BIO 102, CHM 243. Spring (9 wks in duration) 

413 Biology Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community. 
Prerequisite: 24 credits in Biology. Spring 

425 Ecology 4 credits 

A study of the inter-relationships between plants, animals and 
other components of the total environment. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory & Field Work: 2 hours. 
Prerequisites: BIO 102, or BIO 104 or permision of Instructor 
Fall 

431 Field Biology 3 credits 

Familiarization with local plants and animals based on actual field 
observation and collection. Includes sampling of forest, field and 
pond habitats. 
Lecture and field work: 3 hours. Fall 



102 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



BIOLOGY (BIO) 435 Cell Biology 3 credits 

A detailed study of the morphology and physiology of cells. 
Special emphasis is placed on the inter-relationship between 
molecular structure and cell function. 

Prerequisites: BIO 241, CHM 353 (may be taken concurrently.) 
Spring Even Years (1990, 1992) 

475 Instrumentation and Technique 3 credits 

Provides students with an understanding of selected instruments 
and techniques currently used in biological research and medical 
technology. 

Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 4 hours. 
Prerequisites: 16 credits in biology. 
Spring, Odd Years (1991, 1993) 

480 Biological Research 1-2 credits 

Course provides opportunity for student laboratory or theoretical 

research under staff supervision. Permission of divisional chair is 

required. 

Prerequisites: 24 credits in Biology 

Laboratory fee required. Spring 

485 Special Topics 1-4 credits 

Topic may vary from semester to semester and will be announced 
with preregistration information and course hours. 
On demand 

487 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 
Prerequisite: 24 credits. Fall/Spring 

490 Coordinating Seminar 1 credit 

An introduction to the literature of biology. Topics discussed vary 
according to the needs and interests of the students. Prerequisites: 
24 credits in biology. Fall. 



103 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



IH SINESS (BUS) 100 Computing for Business 3 credits 

An introduction to computing emphasizing problem-solving 
concepts and the use of software packages in problem-solving. 
Emphasis is on the understanding of computer history, theory and 
logic as well as computer hardware, system software, word 
processing, electronic spreadsheets and database software. 
Fall Spring 

205 Macroeconomics 3 credits 

The study of macroeconomics. An introduction to the science of 
economics, with particular attention to the market mechanisms of 
supplv and demand, unemployment, inflation, money, banking, 
Federal Reserve, government, and the application of fiscal and 
monetary policy to solve current economic problems. Computer 
applications are utilized. 
Fall/Spring 

206 Microeconomics 3 credits 
The study of microeconomics. Topics covered include supply and 
demand, elasticity, consumer behavior, costs of production, and the 
market structures of competition, monopoly, monopolistic 
competition and oligopoly. Students run a business, using a 
computer simulation, which demonstrates these economic concepts. 
Spring 

208 Principles of Management 3 credits 

The basic principles of management with emphasis on planning, 
organizing, leading, and control. The nature of the managerial 
process within the formal and informal structure will be studied. 
Fall/Spring 

210 Comparative Economics 3 credits 

Varying themes in the historical development of economic systems, 
including the development of the soviet economy. 
Prerequisite: BUS 205. As needed 

269 Principles of Marketing 3 credits 

A general overview of the basic marketing philosophies, principles 
and practices relevant to small and large profit and nonprofit 
organizations, buyers and sellers, special emphasis on the marketing 
mix: product, price, promotion and distribution. 
Fall/Spring 

300/301 Quantitative Methods I/II 3/3 credits 

A study of the use of quantitative methods for business decisions 
with emphasis on graphic methods of data presentation, measures 
of central tendency, descriptive statistics, probability, probability 
distributions, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, analysis 
of variance, forecasting, network models, decision trees, linear 
programming, sensitivity analysis, transportation networks, 
assignment methods, simulations, and queues. Computer 
applications are utilized. 
Fall Spring 



04 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



BUSINESS (BUS) 304 Sales and Sales Management 3 credits 

This course is oriented to the managerial and the strategic aspects 

of sales management. Some emphasis will be placed upon 

recruitment of the sales force, compensation policies, effective 

territorial alignments, time management, and financial 

responsibilities. Interpersonal selling techniques are explored and 

discussed. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269. As needed 

312 Retailing 3 credits 

This course provides a basic foundation of marketing channel 

concepts within a managerial framework as well as the role played 

by channel participants at the manufacturer, wholesaler and retailer 

levels. Physical distribution and management strategies are 

discussed. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269. As needed 

335 Retail Buying 3 credits 

Foundation knowledge of the current policies and procedures used 
in retail buying and merchandising. Included are merchandise 
control, pricing, and merchandise arithmetic. The focus is on 
developing the skills necessary for decision making in a retail buyers 1 
day-to-day world of planning and control. Discussion includes 
assortment planning and quantitative merchandising. 
As needed 

340 Advertising 3 credits 

A comprehensive study of the theory and practical applications of 
advertising and public relations as forms of communication in 
marketing. The student gains an understanding of strategic 
planning, objective setting, tactical decision making, research, 
message and vehicle selection and execution. 
Prerequisite: BUS 269. Fall 

345 Consumer Behavior 3 credits 

A study of the dynamics of consumer markets and their significance 
to marketing executives. Subtopics include the identification and 
measurement of market segments, the analysis of these segments' 
behavioral patterns in regards to shopping and purchasing, and the 
application of this knowledge in developing marketing strategy. 
Prerequisite: BUS 269. Fall 

350 Money and Banking 3 credits 

A study of the principles of money, interest, inflationary and 

deflationary pressures and the development of the banking system 

with emphasis on the federal reserve system, and monetary and fiscal 

policy. 

Prerequisite: BUS 205. Spring 



105 



( ()l KSI 1)1 NCRIl'TIOYS 



HI SINESS (BUS) 352 Business Law 3 credits 

Through law, society establishes values and goals. The purpose of 
American business law is to bring reason, fairness, and stability to 
the marketplace. This course enables students to anticipate the legal 
consequences of business decisions and behaviors. 
Fall 

371 Business Financial Management 3 credits 

A study of the financial problems associated with the life cycle of 
a business. Includes estimating the financial needs of an enterprise, 
breakeven point, operating leverage, capital structure, stocks and 
bonds, and working capital management. Microcomputers are used 
to aid in problem solving. 
Prerequisite: ACC 101. Fall 

382 Personnel and Industrial Relations 3 credits 

A study of the role of work in our society and its effect on 
organizations including the nature of personnel management, the 
legal influences on personnel decisions, recruitment, selection, 
training, compensation, service and benefit programs, the major 
problems and recent developments in labor relations. Computers 
may be utilized to apply these concepts. 
Prerequisite: BUS 208. As needed. 

385 Production and Operations Management 3 credits 

A systematic study of current production theories and practices 
including facilities provision and maintenance, capaciu planning, 

facility location, layout planning, product design, inventory control 
and aggregate planning and scheduling. Emphasis is on terminology, 
general concepts and specifics of different solution techniques and 
methodologies. 
Prerequisites: BUS 208, BUS 300. Fall 

3 90 Human Relations Management 3 credits 
This course emphasizes the human relations skills that are required 
by successful managers. It focuses on motivation, leadership, and 
communication techniques. Case studies, role playing, and dis- 
cussion are employed for understanding individual, group, and 
organizational relationships. 
Prerequisite: BUS 208. Fall 

410 Legal Environment of Business 3 credits 

A study of the general aspects of law essential to the legal 
environment of business relations. A look at the nature of lav. and 
its sources and the various laws that determine the rights and 
obligations regarding business transactions and organizations. 
On demand, every other year 



106 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



BUSINESS (BUS) 420 Small Business Management 3 credits 

Focuses on management practices unique to small businesses, 
preparation of the student for small business ownership, identifying 
characteristics of small businesses, and describing the rewards and 
problems involved in managing retail stores, service firms and 
manufacturing firms. 
Prerequisite: BUS 208. As needed 

421 Special Topics in Marketing 3 credits 

An opportunity for students to explore nontraditional marketing 
phenomena. Great societal marketing opportunities exist in 
organizations other than business firms. Special areas of marketing 
which need attention include nonprofit, health care, education, idea, 
place, political candidate, service and international marketing. 
Prerequisite: BUS 269 or consent of instructor. As needed 

430 Management Information Systems 3 credits 

An interdisciplinary study which views information as an economic 
resource. The course focuses on computer-based information systems 
that support the operations, management and decision functions of 
an organization and explores the basic technical, behavioral, 
economical and organizational concepts relevant to information, 
decision making and systems. Topics include the methodology and 
practice of developing a computerized information system; the 
organization, management and control of the information system and 
the social impact of information technologies. 
Prerequisite: BUS 100, BUS 208. Spring 

440 Marketing Management 3 credits 

A comprehensive study of the management function in marketing. 
Focus is on analysis, planning, and control of the marketing mix. 
Decision-making skills are developed through the use of a computer 
simulation which requires students to manage a firm by making 
decisions regarding price, production, advertising mode, advertising 
content, advertising budget, personnel, research and development, 
and production costs. 
Prerequisites: BUS 208, BUS 269, ACC 101. Spring 

4 50 Marketing Research 3 credits 

A comprehensive and practical overview of the field of marketing 
research emphasizing an applied approach with applications that give 
students an understanding of the scope of marketing research. 
Computers are utilized to analyze research data. 
Prerequisites: BUS 269, BUS 300/301. Fall 

465 Special Topics in Business 1-6 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and will be announced with 
preregistration information. 
Fall/Spring/Summer 



107 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



BUSINESS (BUS) -* 7 2 Business Administration Internship 1 - 6 credits 

On-the-job training in the business community. Students must have 
senior status, a GPA of 2.5 or above, and division approval to 
participate. 
Fall/Spring/Summer 

480 Independent Study 1 - 3 credits 

Special investigation, with the assistance of a faculty member, of a 
selected topic of interest. This course may also be used to satisfy 
the professional set requirement. A GPA of 3.0 or above and 
Division Chair approval required. 
Fall/Spring/Summer 

491 Seminar in Business Policies 3 credits 

The case-method technique is used to study managerial problems 
and the decision-making process. Areas covered include strategic 
planning, setting goals and objectives, marketing, managing, 
production, public relations, personnel, human relations, and 
financial management. Computer simulations are used to involve 
students in decision making in the various areas of the business firm. 
Graduating seniors and qualified juniors only. 
Prerequisites: BUS 208, BUS 269, BUS 301, BUS 206, BUS 371 
Spring 



108 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



CHEMISTRY (CHM) 103/104 General Chemistry 3 credits each 

Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Satisfies the six 

credit science core requirement. 

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall/Spring 

105 Introduction to Organic Chemistry 3 credits 

Survey of carbon compounds, their reactions and uses. For non- 
chemistry majors and minors. CHM 104/105 satisfies the six 
credit science core requirement for nursing students. 
Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: CHM 104. Spring 

133/134 Chemical Principles 4 credits each 

Comprehensive study of the fundamental laws and theories of 

chemistry. Properties and uses of the more common elements 

and their compounds, principles and techniques of systematic 

qualitative analysis and an introduction to quantitative 

laboratory procedures. 

Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: High school chemistry or permission of the 

program director. Fall/Spring 

243/244 Organic Chemistry 4 credits each 

Principal functions of aliphatic and aromatic carbon 
compounds, theory and mechanisms of reactions; preparation of 
a variety of organic compounds. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: CHM 134. Fall/Spring 

264 Inorganic Quantitative Analysis 5 credits 

Theory and laboratory procedures in typical volumetric, 

colorimetric and gravimetric analysis. 

Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 6 hours 

Offered spring semester every third year. (1990) 

343 Physical Chemistry I 4 credits 

Scientific treatment of states and structure of matter; 

thermodynamics; thermochemistry. 

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. 

Prerequisites: CHM 134, CHM 244, PHY 221, PHY 222, MTH 

151, or MTH 152. 

Offered spring semester every third year. (1991) 

353 Biochemistry 3 credits 

Physical principles, carbohydrate metabolism, enzymology and 
energetics. Major classes of biomolecules, intermediary 
metabolism, enzymology and bioenergetics. 
Lecture: 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: CHM 244. Fall 



109 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



CHEMISTRY (CUM) 411 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 4 credits 

Theory and operational techniques in spectroscopy, 
potentiometry, electrochemistry, chromatography and other 
special methods. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 6 hours. 
Prerequisites: CHM 244, CHM 264, PHY 221, PHY 222. 
Spring, every third year 

413 Chemistry Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community. Fall/Spring 

456 Qualitative Organic Analysis 3 credits 

Methods of preparation, identification and purification of 
organic compounds. 
Conference and laboratory hours. 
Prerequisites: CHM 243, CHM 244. 
Offered spring semester every third year. 1992 



10 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



CHILD WELFARE 333 Substance Abuse in the Adolescent Population 3 credits 

SERVICES (CW'S) A study of the special problems of the adolescent substance 

abuser. Correlates which add impetus to the progression of the 
problem will be examined. Emphasis will be on early 
identification and detection as key components in initiating 
intervention strategies. 
Fall, every other year 

363 Child Welfare Services 3 credits 

Introduction to the policies and services that comprise the child 

welfare system in the community. Examination of supportive 

and substitute services, worker roles and activities, and service 

effectiveness. 

Fall, every other year 

392 Child Abuse and Neglect 3 credits 
A practice-oriented course for students who intend to work in 
a protective service role. Abuse and neglect causes, legal 
sanctions for intervention, treatment approaches, case planning, 
and service. 

Fall 

393 Child Welfare Law 3 credits 

Examination of the laws on which child welfare workers rely 
to promote the rights of families and children. State and local 
laws that provide services to families and children, legal 
resources for offenders, child welfare service provision in 
specific areas, e.g. adoption. 

Prerequisite: CWS 363 or permission of instructor. 
Spring, every other year 

395 Foster, Residential and Adoptive Care 3 credits 

Assessment, case planning and the provision of services in foster 
care, in residential facilities and for child adoption. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Spring, every other year 



11 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



COMPUTER SCIENCE (CPS) 100 Introduction to Programming - BASIC 3 credits 

Problem solving methods; algorithm development; procedural 
and data abstraction; program design, BASIC programming. 
Intended for students who do not plan to continue with 
other Computer Science courses. 
Fall/Spring 

101 Introduction to Programming - Pascal 3 credits 

Problem solving methods; algorithm development; procedural 
and data abstraction; program design, Pascal programming. 
Intended for students who plan to continue with other 
Computer Science courses. 
Fall 

121 Computer Programming 3 credits 

Control structures, top-down programming and stepwise 
refinement. Debugging, testing and documentation. 
Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: CPS 101 or knowledge of Pascal and permission 
of instructor. Spring 

221 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 credits 
Basic concepts of computer systems and computer 
architecture. Machine and assembly language programming. 
Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: CPS 121. Fall 

222 Introduction to Computer Organization 3 credits 

Organization and structure of the major computer 
components; mechanics of information transfer and control 
within the digital computer system; fundamentals of logic 
design and computer arithmetic. 
Prerequisite: CPS 121. Spring 

231 Introduction to File Processing 4 credits 
File terminology, structure and manipulation techniques. 
Sequential and random access bulk storage devices. 
Applications of data structures and file processing 
techniques. Introduction to COBOL. 

Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: CPS 121. Fall 

232 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis 3 credits 
Design and analysis of non-numeric algorithms, particularly 
for sorting/merging/searching. Algorithm testing and 
complexity. 

Prerequisite: CPS 231. Spring 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



321 Operating Systems and Computer Architecture 3 credits 

Organization and architecture of computer systems at the 
register-transfer and programming levels; operating systems 
principles; inter-relationship of the operating system and the 
architecture of computer systems. 
Prerequisites: CPS 221, CPS 222 (CPS 231 also 
recommended). Fall 

331 Organization of Programming Languages 3 credits 

Features, limitations, organization and run-time behavior of 
programming languages. Formal study of programming 
language syntax, grammar and data and control structures. 
Examples of language implementations. Continued 
development of problem solution and programming skills. 
Prerequisite: CPS 121 (CPS 221 and 231 strongly 
recommended). Fall 

412 Computers and Society 3 credits 

Concepts of social value and valuations; the effects of 
computers on society; professional ethics in decisions 
concerning social impact; tools and techniques used to solve 
problems related to social consequences of computers. 
Prerequisites: CPS 121 and one of the following: CPS 221, 
CPS 222, CPS 231. Spring 

413 Computer Science Cooperative Education 3-6 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 

community. 

Fall/Spring 

421 Introduction to Numerical Analysis 3 credits 

Numerical techniques for solving equations, systems of 

linear equations, and differential equations. Numerical 

interpolation and approximation. Integration and 

differentiation. 

Prerequisites: CPS 121, MTH 241. Spring 

431 Software Design and Development 3 credits 

Design techniques, organization and management of large 

scale software development. Students work in programming 

teams on a major development project. 

Prerequisite: CPS 232 (CPS 331 strongly recommended). 

Fall 

432 Database Management Systems Design 3 credits 

Introduction to database concepts, data models, data 
description languages, query facilities, file and index 
organization. Data integrity, reliability and security. Students 
work with real database management systems. Prerequisite: 
CPS 232. Spring 



1 13 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



COMPUTER SCIENCE (CPS) 



480 Independent Study 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 
Fall/Spring 



1 -3 credits 



485 Special Topics in Computer Science 1-3 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and will be 
announced with preregistration information. 
Prerequisite for all Special Topics courses: CPS 100 or CPS 
101 or consent of instructor. 
Fall/Spring 



114 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



EDUCATION (EDU) 100 Educational Foundations 3 credits 

An introductory study of American educational systems 
including historical, philosophical, and sociological 
considerations. The status of contemporary education 
practices and future trends are discussed. 
Fall, Spring and Summer 

101 Freshman Seminar credit 

New students are introduced to the teaching profession and 
to the college teacher education programs. 
Fall and Spring 

200 Educational Psychology 3 credits 

Focuses on psychoeducational theories which explain the 
teaching-learning process. Applications of various learning 
theories are discussed. Cross Registration with PSY 342. 
Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall, Spring, and Summer 

220 'Basic Methods 1.5 credits 

An introduction to the general strategies of teaching. Lesson 
planning and presentation strategies, scheduling, record 
keeping, assessment, and audio/visual materials are 
discussed. 
Fall/Spring 

221 'Science Methods 1.5 credits 

Curriculum topics in elementary science are explained and 
specific strategies are developed. 
Prerequisite: EDU 220. Spring 

222 'Language Arts Methods 1.5 credits 

Curriculum topics in elementary language arts (spelling, 
penmanship, grammar, writing, etc.) are explored and 
specific strategies are developed. 
Prerequisite: EDU 220. Fall 

223 'Social Studies Methods 1.5 credits 

Curriculum topics in elementary social studies are explored 
and specific strategies are developed. 
Prerequisite: EDU 220. Spring 

224 'Health Methods 3 credits 

Curriculum topics in elementary health education are 
explored. Issues in health education such as nutrition, sexual 
development, physical fitness, medical interventions, 
medications, and substance abuse are highlighted. 
Prerequisite: EDU 220. Spring 

260 'Classroom Management 3 credits 

Classroom management issues are discussed. Discipline and 
motivational strategies are developed. 
Prerequisite: PSY 123 (could be taken concurrently with 
EDU 200). Fall 



M5 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



EDUCATION (EDU) 320 'Reading Methods I 3 credits 

The nature of the reading process and fundamentals of 
group instruction in reading are highlighted. Elementary 
curriculum and materials are studied. 
Prerequisite: EDU 220. Fall 

321 'Reading Methods II 3 credits 

Methods of identification of reading disorders are explained. 
Corrective and remedial strategies are developed. 
Prerequisite: EDU 320. Spring 

322 'Mathematics Methods 3 credits 
Curriculum topics in elementary mathematics education are 
explored. Specific strategies are developed. Students are 
introduced to computer-based instruction. 

Prerequisite: EDU 220. Spring 

323 'Communication Disorders 3 credits 
A study of the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of organic 
and functional speech and language disorders. 
Fall/Spring 

325 'Art Methods 1 credit 
Curriculum topics in art education are explored. Ways art is 
integrated into the total school program are discussed. 
Prerequisite: EDU 220. Fall 

326 'Music Methods 1 credit 

Curriculum topics in music education are explored. Ways 

music is integrated into the total school program are 

discussed. 

Prerequisite: EDU 220. Fall 

327 'School Law 1 credit 
Educational law issues are explored. Topics related to the 
rights and responsibilities of students and teachers are 
discussed. Fall 

362 'Early Childhood Curriculum 3 credits 
Curriculum areas which facilitate child development are 
explored. 

Prerequisite: EDU 220. Fall 

363 'Early Childhood Methods 3 credit 

Focuses on content, methods, and materials used to facilitate 
child development. (EDU 605: Field experience must be with 
pre school class) 
Prerequisite: EDU 220. Spring 

369 Children's Literature and Storytelling 3 credits 

Curriculum topics in elementary literature studies are 
explored. Uses of children's literature and storytelling 
techniques are developed. Fall 



116 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



EDUCATION (EDU) 



380 *Senior Seminar credits 

Prepares students for their student teaching semester and for 
dealing with issues related to certification and employment. 
Fall/Spring 

400 'Parents 3 credits 

Parenting styles and techniques are discussed and their 
impact on teaching and learning are explored. Parent- 
teacher communication issues and strategies are developed. 
Spring 



413 Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community. 

480 'Independent Study 1-2 credits 

Students, with the assistance of faculty mentors, investigate 

selected topics. 

Fall, Spring and Summer 

485 'Special Topics 1-2 credits 

Mini-courses are offered on various topics. Students may 

elect special topics courses. 

Fall/Spring 

495, 499 'Student Teaching and Seminar 9 credits 

Students spend 15 weeks practice teaching in local schools 
under the guidance of an experienced teacher and a college 
supervisor. Weekly seminars are scheduled. 
Fall/Spring 

Field Experiences credit 

Students are expected to spend one-half day per week each 
semester from the second semester of their freshman year to 
the first semester of their senior year observing and working 
in community classrooms. Certain courses require projects to 
be completed during field experiences. Students in the 
elementary education program must complete 5 Elementary 
Education and 1 Special Education field experiences. 
Students in the Elementary and Early Childhood Education 
program must complete 4 Elementary, 1 Preschool, and 1 
Special Education field experiences. The preschool field 
must be done concurrently with the Early Childhood 
Methods course. 

EDU 601 Field Experience 1 

EDU 602 Field Experience 2 

EDU 603 Field Experience 3 

EDU 604 Field Experience 4 

EDU 605 Field Experience 5 

EDU 606 Field Experience 6 
* Enrollment open only to students pursuing elementary and Special Education majors; 
persons enrolled in School Nurse certification; and students in the Radiography with 
Education Specialization program. 



117 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ENGLISH (ENG) 103 Composition 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in writing skills for college and 

professional life. 

Fall/Spring 

105 The Research Paper 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in writing research papers from the 
choice of a topic to completion of the final draft. 
Variable lecture/discussion and laboratory hours. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Spring 

112 Speech Communication 3 credits 

A content and performance oriented course designed to 
teach the importance of speech communication in today's 
society. Basic principles of speech communication; 
application of principles through the creation of 
communication messages; giving and receiving constructive 
criticism; avoiding communication breakdowns. 
Fall/Spring 

120 Theatre Production 1 credit 

The preparation and presentation of productions including 
rehearsal, performance, stage management, scenery 
production, constructing properties, lighting, sound, 
costumes, programs, box office, publicity, etc. May be 
repeated for credit. 
Fall/Spring 

201/202 History of the Theatre and Drama 3 credits each 

A complete survey of the physical and dramatic development 
of the theatre from pre-Greek to modern times. Readings in 
dramatics, literature and criticism of the various periods. 201 
covers pre-Greek to Elizabethan period. 202 covers French 
Neo-Classicism to 20th century. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Spring, every other year 

203 Advanced Expository Writing 3 credits 

Writing clear expository prose. Practice in the major modes 
of exposition; rhetorical strategies and their influences on 
style. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Spring 

221/222 Major British Writers 3 credits each 

A study of twelve or more British writers each semester. 221 
covers Chaucer to Johnson; 222 covers Blake to Heaney. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Fall/Spring 

247/248 American Literature 3 credits each 

A study of American writers. 247 covers the colonial period 

to Walt Whitman; 248 covers the Age of Realism to the 20th 

century. 

Prerequisite: ENG 103. Fall/Spring 



118 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ENGLISH (ENG) 266/267 Western World Literature 3 credits each 

A survey of major European literature, with emphasis on 
the ways in which specific works reflect the cultural values 
and historical situations of the people who produced them. 
The first semester (266) covers the classical and medieval 
periods; the second semester (267) includes selected readings 
in European literature from the Renaissance to the 20th 
century. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Fall/Spring 

318 The Study of Language 3 credits 

A study of American English: grammatical systems - 
traditional, transformational, generative. Historical 
development of the English language since 1066. Major 
influences on current American English such as Indo- 
European roots; immigration, borrowings, assimilations; 
geographical/occupational contributions; the Black American 
language systems. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Spring 

339 Technical Writing 3 credits 

Technique and practice in writing basic technical reports. 
Guidelines for scientific reporting; memoranda; progress 
reports; formal documents. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Fall/Spring 

341 Imaginative Writing 3-6 credits 

Development of writing skills in poetry, short stories, 

journals, essays, letters. Students select one or more areas of 

specialization under a contract work agreement with the 

instructor. Number of students limited. 

Lecture and laboratory. 

Prerequisites: ENG 103 and permission of instructor. 

Spring, every other year 

343 Writing for Media 3 credits 

Basic communication technique with emphasis on news 

values, reporting and writing. 

Prerequisite: ENG 103. Fall, every other year 

350 Medieval and Renaissance Literature 3 credits 

Intensive study of one or more selected authors, genres or 
movements, including such topics as Chaucer, Shakespeare, 
Elizabethan drama, the pastoral, metaphysical poetrv. 
Specific topic announced before registration. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Fall, every other year 

351 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature 3 credits 

Intensive study of one or more selected authors, genres or 
movements, including such topics as Restoration Drama, the 
Age of Pope, satire, biography, and the beginnings of the 
novel. Specific topic announced before registration. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Spring, every other year 



119 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ENGLISH (ENG) 352 Nineteenth Century Literature 3 credits 

Intensive study of one or more selected genres or movements 
including such topics as Romanticism, Victorian studies, the 
American Renaissance, the novel, biography. Course may 
cover American or British literature. Specific topic to be 
announced before registration. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Fall, every other year 

353 Twentieth Century Literature 3 credits 

Intensive study of selected authors, genres or movements, 
including such topics as modern fiction, modern drama, 
British poetry, contemporary American novels. Course may 
cover British or American literature. Specific topic 
announced before registration. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Spring, every other year 

413 English Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community for junior or seniors. 
Fall/Spring 

415 Selected Studies in Literature 3 credits 

Intensive study of one or more authors, genres or movements 
in British, American or World literature. Material may cross 
national, chronological or disciplinary lines, for example, 
literature of women, literature of the old and aging, and 
other pertinent topics. Students may request areas for study. 
Specific topic will be announced before registration. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Spring, every other year 

470 Internship 3-6 credits 

Directed experience in selected phases of communications. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Fall/Spring 

480 Independent Study 1-6 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. English majors only. 
Prerequisite: ENG 103. Fall/Spring 



120 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FINE ARTS (FA) 201/202 Fine Arts 3 credits each 

An interdisciplinary approach to aesthetic perception and 
judgment. Perceptual skills, historical, philosophical and 
social background for the Fine Arts in Western Civilization, 
presented within a chronological format. 
Prerequisites: None for Part I, Part I is prerequisite for 
Part II. Fall/Spring 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FOODS AND NUTRITION (F&N) 205 Nutrition in Childhood 3 credits 

Principles of nutrition and the methods and techniques for 
teaching these principles to children. 
Lecture: 3 hours. 
On demand 

241 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 credits 

A study of the major nutrients including characteristics, 
functions and metabolism. Inter-relationship of nutrients; 
effects of inadequate and excessive intake; principles of 
energy metabolism; study of student's nutritional 
requirements. 

Prerequisite: CHM 104 or permission of instructor. 
Fall/Spring 

324 Nutrition and Aging 3 credits 

A review of the principles of nutrition and the application 
of these principles to the elderly. Nutrients and their 
selection, use and intake; the role of nutrition in 
maintenance of health, prevention and treatment of disease. 
Prerequisite: F&N 241 or permission of instructor. 
On demand 



122 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



GEOGRAPHY (GEO) 201 Earth Science 3 credits 

A study of earth's physical environment. Astronomy, 
weather and climate, oceans, rocks, minerals and landforms 
are explored individually and in relation to one another. 
Fall 

202 Cultural World Geography 3 credits 

A survey of the earth's people and their relationships to the 
total environment. Europe, Africa, the Middle East, 
Australia, Asia, the Soviet Union, Latin America, the 
United States and Canada will be studied regionally. 
Spring 

204 Medical Ecology 3 credits 

A study of disease in the context of particular times and 
places. The various relationships that exist in disease 
complexes. 
Fall/Spring 

413 Geography Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 

community. 

Fall/Spring 

451-464 Special Topics in Geography 1-3 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and will be 
announced with preregistration information. 
Fall/Spring 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 
Fall/Spring 



123 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



GERONTOLOGY (GER) 



241 Introduction to Social Gerontology 3 credits 

Introduction to the study of aging as just one of many normal 
life processes in contemporary culture. Issues discussed include 
the biological, psychological and sociological aspects of aging 
and the implications of those aspects. 

GER 241 is a prerequisite for all other gerontology courses. 
Fall/Spring 



276 Psychology of Aging 3 credits 

The psychological impact of age-related changes that occur 
between early and late maturity. Topics include changes in 
perceptual abilities, intellect and learning capabilities in late 
life; adjustment to retirement; role changes; and environmental 
issues which contribute to psychological health. 
Spring, every other year 

292 Older Women 3 credits 

Focuses on the experience of aging as a woman in an agist and 
sexist society. Emphasis on the image of the older woman, her 
physical and mental health, life patterns and economic 
security. 
Fall, every other year 

304 Nutrition and Aging 3 credits 

The application of the principles of nutrition to the special 
needs of the elderly. An understanding of the basic nutritional 
needs of the aging for students without formal training in 
nutrition. Students with no previous course work in nutrition 
may be required to complete additional assignments. 
Fall, every other year 

306 Health and Physiology of Aging 3 credits 

A study of the effects of aging individuals' physiological 
changes on overall health. Identification of prevalent health 
problems in the aging; common conditions of each body 
system and their distinct features in the elderly; importance of 
rehabilitation to health maintenance and wellness. Students 
with no previous course work in physiology may be required 
to complete additional assignments. 
Fall, every other year 



341 Substance Abuse and the Aged 3 credits 

Focuses on the use patterns, diagnosis and treatment methods 
specific to the aged substance abuser. Issues examined will 
include misuse and abuse of prescription drugs, behavior and 
risk factors, factors related to underdiagnosis, and relationship 
to depression and suicide. 
Fall, everv other vear 



124 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



GERONTOLOGY (GER) 



358 Counseling the Older Adult 

The effective use of individual and group counseling 
techniques for older persons with emotional or social 
difficulties in adjusting to the aging process. 
Spring, every other year 



3 credits 



375 Aging Policies and Programs 3 credits 

The historical development and current implementation of 
social policies for the aging. Discussion of policies affecting 
income, health care, social services, and volunteerism. 
Spring 

392-393 Seminar 3 credits each 

In-depth study of a special topic or area of interest. Small 
group discussion format for advanced students. 
On demand 

410 Adult Protective Services 3 credits 

Examination of the needs and potentialities of the most 
vulnerable and frail of the nation's elderly population. Study 
of the philosophy and delivery of protective services for the 
elderly. 
Fall, every other year 

413 Gerontology Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 

community. 

On demand 

470 Practicum 3 credits 

Work experience in a selected agency which provides services 
to the aged. Practicum supervised by an agency representative; 
education directed by faculty. Direct service to clients. 
On demand 



480 Independent Study 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 
On demand 



1-3 credits 



125 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



HISTORY (HIS) 101/102 History of Western Ci>ilization Survey 3 credits each 

Study of the main currents in Western cultural and political 
development. Emphasis on European history from the 
Renaissance to the present. 
Fall/Spring 

103/104 United States History Survey 3 credits each 

A survey of significant political, economic, social and 
intellectual themes in the development of the United States. 
103 covers colonial times until 1900; 104 covers 1900 to the 
present. 
Fall/Spring 

210 History of Comparative Economics 3 credits 

Varying themes in the historical development of economic 
systems, including the development of the Soviet economies. 
Prerequisite: 2 semester History Survey. Spring 

272 Alternate Social Systems/ 

Fascism, Socialism and Capitalism 3 credits 

Comparative study of the three political-economic systems 
which dominate modern western Europe. Emphasis on the 
twentieth century phenomena of Fascism, Democratic 
Socialism and Capitalism. 
Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. Fall 

301 History of Nineteenth Century Revolutions 3 credits 
Detailed study of the political, social and intellectual events 
which culminated in the revolutions of 1789, 1830 and 1848. 
Emphasis on the industrial and economic conditions which led 
to late nineteenth century radical movements. 

Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. On demand 

302 History of Europe in the Twentieth Century 3 credits 
An examination of major European developments since the 
beginning of the First World War. The nature of ideologies of 
totalitarian states. 

Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. On demand 

305 Recent American Domestic History 3 credits 
A reading and discussion seminar focusing on how the 
Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon 
administrations dealt with major domestic social and economic 
issues. Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey 
Fall/Spring 

306 The Cold War 1941-1951 3 credits 
Study of the factors that led to the rise of the Cold War in 
Europe and Asia. Focuses on the debate surrounding the issue 
of responsibility for the superpower confrontation after 1945. 
Reading and discussion seminar. 

Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. On demand 



126 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



HISTORY (HIS) 307 History of Russia 3 credits 

Study of the great Kievan empire, the Mongol yoke, the rise 
of Moscovite Tsars, the expansion of absolutism and empire 
and social revolution. 
Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. On demand 

308 History of Soviet Union 3 credits 

The development of the Soviet Union from its revolutionary 

beginnings in 1917 through social upheaval, the terror of the 

purges, the tragedy and triumph of World War Two, and the 

growth of the Soviet Empire. 

Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. 

Spring every 2nd year 

310 History of England 3 credits 

A detailed study of the Tudor-Stuart period. Emphasis is on 

the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The course 

culminates with the crisis between crown and parliament under 

the Stuart kings. 

Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey 

Spring, every other year 

311 History of Britain 3 credits 

The development of British history from 1689 to the present. 
This course stresses the development of parliamentary 
government, the growth of the empire, and the emergence of 
Great Britain as a leading world power. 
Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey 
Spring, every other year 

320 Selected Studies in History 3 credits 
A lecture and discussion approach to the study of special 
themes in history. On request students may take this course 
more than once if the theme they are studying differs. 
Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. On demand 

321 Nazi Germany 3 credits 

An in-depth study of totalitarianism focusing primarily in 
Germany from 1920-1945. Emphasis on the career of Adolph 
Hitler, the SS, the Nazi state, the destruction of European 
Jewry, and World War Two. Secondary emphasis on the 
phenomena of racism and nationalism. 
Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. On demand 

390 Junior Research Seminar 3 credits 

An introduction to historical methods and research. Students 
select a topic for a bachelor thesis and are guided in their 
research and writing. Offered annually. Required of junior 
history majors. 
Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. Spring 



127 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



HISTORY (HIS) 401 History of the American Revolution 1763-1789 3 credits 

A study of the causes, consequences and meaning of the 

American Revolutionary era. 

Prerequisite: 2 semesters of History Survey. On demand 

413 History Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Director. On demand 

450 History Internship 3 credits 

Directed field experience in archival and/or museum projects 
for junior and senior students at the Wyoming Historical and 
Geological Society. Students supervised by the professional 
staff of the Society in cooperation with history faculty. 
Permission of the instructor required. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Director. On demand 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 
On demand. 

490 History Seminar 3 credits 

Study of selected problems or topics determined by students 
and seminar instructor. 
On demand 



121 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



MATHEMATICS (MTH) 



090 Mathematics I 3 credits 

Development of quantitative problem solving. Methods of 
problem solving. Reading, determining, and solving problems 
using basic arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. Common 
mathematical models of everyday phenomena. Enrollment 
based on results of placement examination. 
Fall/Spring 



095 College Algebra and Trigonometry 3 credits 

Linear equations, inequalities, functions, graphing, logarithms 
and exponentials, circular functions. Enrollment based on 
results of placement tests. 
Fall/Spring 

100 Mathematical Perspectives 3 credits 

The place of mathematics in human enterprise and the central 
role it has played in the development of western civilization. 
Topics chosen from among: calculus ideas, geometry, graph 
theory, modern logic, number theory, unsolvable problems. 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of core requirement in 
Math Bank I. 
Fall/Spring 

115 Basic Statistics I 3 credits 

An introduction to the use of statistical methods with emphasis 
on practical applications. Descriptive statistics, frequency 
distributions, estimation of parameters, introduction to 
hypothesis testing, correlations, linear regression and the use of 
computers in statistics. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 
core requirement in Math Bank I. 
Fall/Spring 

151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 3 credits 

Basic concepts, limits, derivatives and applications, the conies, 
the integral. Enrollment based on results of placement tests. 
Fall 



152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 3 credits 

Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, polar 
coordinates, vectors in R2 and R3, differential equations. 
Prerequisite: MTH 151. 
Spring 

215 Mathematical Statistics 3 credits 

Probability theory,, probability distributions, sampling theory, 
testing of hypotheses, curve fitting and correlation. 
Prerequisite: MTH 152 (MTH 115 recommended). Spring 

225 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 credits 

Spherical and cylindrical coordinates, partial derivatives, 
multiple and line integrals, sequences and series. 
Prerequisite: MTH 152. Fall 



129 



COl RSI 1)1 S( RIIMTONS 



MAI HEMATICS (MTU) 



241 Linear Algebra 3 credits 
Systems of linear equations, vector space, inner products, 
determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, applications. 
Prerequisite: MTH 152. Spring 

242 Differential Equations 3 credits 

Equations of first order and degree, higher order and degree 
equations, including linear with constant coefficients, systems 
of equations. 
Prerequisite: MTH 225. Spring 

244 Set Theory and Logic 3 credits 

Introduction to set theory, equivalence and order. Boolean 
algebra, introduction to logic, rules of inference. Prerequisite: 
MTH 152. Fall 



341 Principles of Analysis I 3 credits 
Real number system, topology, sequences and series, continuity 
and differentiability. 

Prerequisite: MTH 225, MTH 241. Fall 

342 Principles of Analysis II 3 credits 

Riemann-Stieltjes integral, functions of several variables, 
introduction to complex and analysis, Lebesgue theory. 
Prerequisite: MTH 341. Spring 

350 Mathematical Physics 3 credits 
Some mathematical techniques necessary for the study of 
advanced physics. Includes Fourier series, Bessel functions, 
Legendre polynomials, vector analysis and solution of partial 
differential equations in boundary value problems. Course 
offered on request. Prerequisite: MTH 242. Fall 

351 Geometry 3 credits 
History of geometry, axiom systems, types of geometries, 
axiomatic development of a geometric theory. Prerequisite: 
MTH 244. Spring 

363 Abstract Algebra I 3 credits 

Introduction to abstract algebra, groups, introduction to rings 

and fields. 

Prerequisite: MTH 225, MTH 244. Fall 



364 Abstract Algebra II 

Rings, integral domains, fields, polynomials. 
Prerequisite: MTH 363. Spring 



3 credits 



413 Math Cooperative Education 3-6 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 

community. 

Fall, Spring 



30 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



MATHEMATICS (MTH) 



421 Introduction to Numerical Analysis 3 credits 

Numerical techniques for solving equations, systems of linear 
equations, differential equations. Numerical interpolation, 
approximation, integration and differentiation. Prerequisite: 
MTH 241, CPS 121. Spring 



480 Independent Study 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 
On demand 



1-3 credits 



486 Special Topics in Mathematics 1-3 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and will be announced 

with preregistration information. 

Fall/Spring 



490 Mathematics Seminar 

Prerequisite: Permission of Department. 
On demand 



3 credits 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



MEDICAL 
TECHNOLOGY (MED) 



100 Introduction to Medical Technology 1 credit 

A familiarization with theory and laboratory practices in the 
field of medical technology. Laboratory and classroom 
experiences. 
Spring 

400 Clinical Microbiology 8 credits 

Identification and clinical pathology of bacteria, fungi, viruses 
and parasites. Techniques to isolate, stain, and culture, and to 
determine antimicrobial susceptibility. Instrumentation; quality 
control. 
Fall 



■401 Clinical Chemistry 7 credits 

Enzymology, endocrinology, biochemistry of lipids, 
carbohydrates and proteins, metabolism of nitrogenous end 
products, physiology and metabolism of fluids and electrolytes 
and toxicology as related to the body and diseases. The 
technical procedures include colorimetry, spectrophometry 
electrophoresis, chromatography, automation and quality 
control. 
Fall 



402 Clinical Hematology/Coagulation 5 credits 
The composition and function of blood; diseases related to 
blood disorders; the role of platelets and coagulation. Manual 
and automated techniques of diagnostic tests for abnormalities. 
Spring 

403 Clinical Immunohematology 4 credits 

Blood antigens, antibodies, crossmatching, hemolytic diseases, 
and related diagnostic tests. An in-depth study of blood donor 
service and its many facets such as transfusions, medico-legal 
aspects, etc. 
Spring 

404 Clinical Immunology/Serology 4 credits 
Immune response, immunoglobulins, autoimmunity and 
complement and related tests and diseases. Survey and 
demonstration of serological diagnostic tests. 

Spring 



405 



480 



Clinical Seminar 2 credits 

Other courses which are not included in the above (such as 
orientation, laboratory management, education, clinical 
microscopy) and are unique to the individual hospital program. 
Spring 



Independent Study 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 

Fall/Spring 



1 -3 credits 



132 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



MUSIC (MUS) 117/118 Applied Music 1 credit each 

Applied music for non-music majors. May be repeated for 
credit. 

230 Music Appreciation 3 credits 

A study of the basic materials of music; analysis of music with 
reference to the cultural background. 

231 American Music 3 credits 

Exploration of the style and structure of jazz and blues; 
musical comedy and ballet; contemporary and electronic music. 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 

601 College Chorus credit 

604 Chamber Singers credit 



133 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NTRSING (NSC) 200 Introduction to Nursing Concepts 3 credits 

Focuses upon the concepts of professionalism, communication, 
growth and development, and wellness. The interrelatedness of 
the concepts with professional nursing practice are explored. 
Clinical fieldwork reflects integrated concepts of professional 
nursing practice. 

Prerequisites: CHM 105, PSY 123, SOC 1 10, BIO 21 1, BIO 22" 
and F&N 241, prerequisite NLN score above 40th percentile. 
CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 
liability insurance. 
Corequisites: NSG 265 and BIO 212. Spring 

265 Basic Clinical Nursing Concepts 

Strategies and Skills 1 credit 

Introduces basic competencies in cognitive, affective, and 
psychomotor skills for application in a clinical setting. 
Scientific and humanistic concepts are integrated with 
simulation of clinical skills. 

Prerequisites: CHM 105, PSY 123, SOC 110, BIO 211, BIO 227 
and F&N 241, pre-nursing NLN score above 40th percentile 
and annual health examination. 
Corequisites: NSG 200 and BIO 212. Spring 

293 Introduction to Professional Nursing 

Concepts for Health Care Pro>iders 3 credits 

The course establishes the framework for health promotion and 
health maintenance based upon concepts of nursing process 
and the role of the professional nurse in nursing practice. It 
provides a set of concepts and tools necessary to provide 
holistic care to persons at varied levels of wellness and at 
varied developmental stages throughout the life cycle. The 
nursing theories of Sr. Callista Roy and Imogene King are 
explored in conjunction with nursing process and health 
assessment of clients. 

Prerequisites: Matriculation status, proof of RN licensure. 
Corequisites: Successful completion of at least twenty nursing 
credits through RN Validation Examination and NSG 294. 
Accelerated Program only. 

294 Validation of Clinical Nursing Practice 3 credits 
Competencies in cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills 
for application in a clinical setting. Scientific and humanistic 
concepts are integrated. Registered nurses are provided 
opportunities to validate/simulate nursing practice. 
Corequisite: NSG 293. 

Accelerated Program only. 



134 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING (NSG) 350 Intermediate Nursing Concepts 

Over the Life Span I 3 credits 

Introduces the nursing theory of Sr. Callista Roy and focuses 
student attention on the following concepts: General 
Adaptation Theory, Pain, Fluid and Electrolyte Balance, and 
Acid-Base Balance. Students will be directed to find 
commonalities and differences in each of the concepts. 
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all course work 
required through Freshman and Sophomore year, end of year 
testing at or above 40th percentile, NSG 200 and NSG 265 
CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 
liability insurance. 
Corequisites: NSG 355, NSG 361, and NSG 365. Fall 



351 Intermediate Nursing Concepts 

Over the Life Span II 3 credits 

Develops understanding of the concepts of Gas Exchange, 
Transport, Mental Health, Crisis, Anxiety, Self-Esteem, 
Sexuality, and Depression. Students will be directed to find 
commonalities, differences, and the interrelatedness of the 
concepts. 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all course work required 
through Freshman, Sophomore, and first semester of Junior 
year. Successful achievement of end-of-year testing through 
Sophomore year with scores at or above 40th percentile. 
Prerequisites: NSG 350, NSG 355, NSG 361 and NSG 365 
CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 
liability insurance. 
Corequisites: NSG 356, NSG 362, and NSG 366. Spring 

355 Application of Intermediate Nursing 

Concepts Over the Life Span I 3 credits 

Prototypes will be presented addressing the following concepts: 
General Adaptation Syndrome, Pain, Fluid, and Electrolytes 
and Acid-Base. Roy's adaptation theory of nursing will be 
utilized in the nursing care of the prototype clients. Students 
will be encouraged to identify similarities and differences in 
nursing management of the prototype clients. 
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all course work 
required through Freshman and Sophomore year. Successful 
achievement on end-of-year testing through Sophomore year 
with scores at or above 40th percentile. 
CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 
liability insurance. 
Corequisites: NSG-350, NSG 361, and NSG 365. Fall 



135 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING (NSG) 356 Application of Intermediate Nursing 

Concepts Over the Life Span II 3 credits 

For each of the following concepts, Gas Exchange, Transport, 
Mental Health, Crisis, Anxiety, Self-Esteem, Sexuality and 
Depression, prototypes will be presented. Students will be 
encouraged to look for similarities and differences in the 
prototypes. Roy's Nursing Theory will be utilized with each 
prototype. 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all course work 
required through Freshman, Sophomore, and 1st semester 
Junior year. Successful achievement of end-of-year tests with 
scores at or above 40th percentile through the Sophomore year. 
Corequisites: NSG 351, NSG 362, and NSG 366. Spring 

361 Clinical Application of Intermediate 

Nursing Concepts Over the Life Span I 4 credits 

Direct provision of nursing care will be provided for clients 
whose alteration(s) in health reflect the concepts and 
prototypes taught in corequisite courses. The nursing process 
using Sr. Callista Roy's Model of Care will be emphasized. 
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all course work 
required through Freshman and Sophomore year. Successful 
achievement on end-of-year testing through Sophomore year 
with scores at or above 40th percentile. 
CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 
liability insurance. 
Corequisites: NSG 350, NSG 355, and NSG 365. Fall 

362 Clinical Application of Intermediate 

Nursing Concepts Over the Life Span II 4 credits 

Direct provision of nursing care will be provided with 
alteration in health, reflect the prototype, and concept taught 
in the corequisite courses. Nursing process using Callista Roy's 
Model will be emphasized. 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all courses required in 
first semester of Junior year. Successful achievement of end- 
of-year tests with scores at or above 40th percentile. 
CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 
liability insurance. 
Corequisites: NSG 351, NSG 356, and NSG 366. Spring 

365 Intermediate Clinical Nursing 

Concepts Strategies, and Skills 1 credit 

Develops intermediate competencies in cognitive, affective. 

and psychomotor skills for application in a clinical setting. 

Scientific and humanistic concepts are integrated with 

simulation of clinical skills. 

Prerequisites: Successful achievement of all courses through 

Freshman and Sophomore year. Successful achievement of 

end-of-year tests with scores at or above 40th percentile 

through Sophomore year. 

Corequisites: NSG 350, NSG 355, and NSG 361. Fall 



136 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING (NSG) 366 Advanced Clinical Nursing 

Concepts, Strategies, and Skills 1 credit 

Refines advanced competencies in cognitive, affective, and 
psychomotor skills for application in a clinical setting. 
Scientific and humanistic concepts are integrated with 
simulation of clinical skills. 
Corequisites: NSG 351, NSG 356, and NSG 362. Spring 

390 Nursing Research 3 credits 

An introductory course which provides students with an 
overall view of the research process. The importance of 
research in nursing is discussed as well as the need for 
increased research. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 
required courses through sophomore year. Spring 

395 Pharmacology 3 credits 

Pharmacologic aspects of nursing. Drug classifications, 

actions, interactions, and administrations are emphasized. 

Monitoring client response, patient education, and other 

nursing implications are included. 

Prerequisites: NSG 200/NSG 265 or permission of instructor. 

Fall 

450 Advanced Nursing Concepts 

Over the Life Span I 3 credits 

The nursing theory of Imogene King is introduced. In 
addition, the course explores five (5) concepts common in 
nursing: Change, Body Image, Cell Proliferation, Mobility/ 
Immobility, and Infection/Inflammation. Students will be 
directed to find the commonalities and differences in each of 
the concepts. 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all course work 
required through Freshman and Sophomore and Junior years. 
Successful achievement on end-of-year tests through Junior 
year with scores at or above 40th percentile. 
Prerequisites: NSG 351, NSG 356, NSG 362 and NSG 366 
CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 
liability insurance. Corequisites: NSG 455 and NSG 461. Fall 

451 Advanced Nursing Concepts 

Over the Life Span II 3 credits 

Explores concepts common in nursing: Community Nursing, 

Stress in the Community, Self-Esteem in the Community, 

Health in Special Communities, Neural Regulation, Chemical 

Regulation, and Sensory Regulation. 

Prerequisites: All course work required through First Semester 

of Senior Year. 

Prerequisites: NSG 450, NSG 455, and NSG 461 

CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 

liability insurance. 

Corequisites: NSG 456 and NSG 462. Spring 



137 



('Ol'RSK 1)1 SCRIP i IONS 



M RSING (NSG) 455 Application of Advanced Nursing 

Concepts Over the Life Span I 3 credits 

Prototypes will be presented addressing the following concepts: 
Change, Body Image, Cell Proliferation, Mobility/Immobility, 
and Infection/Inflammation. King's model of nursing will be 
utilized in the nursing care of the prototypic parent-child 
families. Students will be encouraged to identify similarities 
and differences in nursing management of the prototype. 
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all course work 
required through Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior year. 
Successful achievement on end-of-year tests through Junior 
year with scores at or above 40th percentile. 
CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 
liability insurance. 
Corequisites: NSG 450 and NSG 461. Fall 

456 Application of Advanced Nursing 

Concepts Over the Life Span II 3 credits 

Prototypes will be presented addressing the following concepts: 
Nursing in the Community; Stress in the Community; Self- 
Esteem in the Community; Health of Special Communities; 
Alteration in Neural-regulation; Alteration in Chemical 
Regulation; and Alteration in Sensory Regulation. Imogene 
King's nursing theory will be utilized in the prototypes. 
Students will be encouraged to identify similarities and 
differences among prototypes. Prerequisites: All course work 
required through First Semester Senior year. 
CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 
liability insurance. 
Corequisites: NSG 451 and NSG 462. Spring 

461 Clinical Application of Advanced 

Nursing Concepts Over the Life Span I 4 credits 

Direct provision of nursing care will be provided for clients 

whose alterations of health reflect the prototypes and concepts 

taught in the corequisite courses. Nursing process using 

Imogene King's theory will be emphasized. 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all courses required in 

Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior year. Successful 

achievement on end-of-year tests through Junior year with 

scores at or above 40th percentile. 

CPR certification, annual health examination, and current 

liability insurance. 

Corequisites: NSG 450 and NSG 455. Fall 



138 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING (NSG) 462 Clinical Application of Advanced Nursing 

Concepts Over the Life Span II 4 credits 

Direct provision of nursing care will be provided with clients 
with alteration in health that reflect the concepts and 
prototypes taught in co-required courses. The nursing process 
according to King's theory will be emphasized. 
Prerequisites: All courses required in First Semester of Senior 
year. CPR certification, annual health examination, and 
current liability insurance. 
Corequisites: NSG 451 and NSG 456. Spring 

484 Practicum for School Nursing Certification 5 credits 

The school nurse practicum provides a knowledge base of the 
precepts, concepts and principles of school nursing. During 
this clinical experience, the student acquires skills related to 
the roles and functions of the school nurse. 
Prerequisites: Completion of NSG 487 or equivalent. 
CPR certification, annual health examination, current liability 
insurance, all other courses required for certification, and 
permission of clinical preceptor. Fall/Spring 

485 Community Health Nursing Concepts 1.5 credits 

Concepts common in nursing particularly: Community Nursing, 
Stress in the Community, Self-Esteem in the Community, 
Health in Special Communities. 

Prerequisites: Registered nurse and Bachelor's degree, CPR 
certification, health examinations, and current liability 
insurance. This course is limited to School Nurse certification. 
Corequisite: NSG 486 and NSG 487. Spring 

486 Application of Community Health Concepts 1.5 credits 

Prototypes will be presented addressing the following concepts: 
Nursing in the Community, Stress in the Community, Self- 
Esteem in the Community, Health in Special Communities. 
Prerequisites: Registered nurse and Bachelor's degree. 
Corequisites: NSG 485 and NSG 487. Spring 

487 Community Health Nursing Clinical 1.5 credits 

Direct provision of nursing care will be provided for clients in 
Community Health settings. 

Prerequisites: Registered nurse and Bachelor's degree. 
Corequisites: NSG 485 and NSG 486. Spring 

495 Leadership and Issues in Nursing Seminar 2 credits 

Designed to introduce the students to the concepts of leader- 
ship and management in nursing. Furthermore, students will 
analyze the major issues and trends in nursing and health care 
with special attention to the socioeconomic, educational, and 
political variables in the health care system. Seminar approach 
with student presentations utilized. Prerequisites: All courses 
successfully completed through Freshman, Sophomore, and 
Junior years. Successful Achievement on end-of-year testing 
through Junior year at or above 40th percentile. Spring 



L39 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



OCCUPATIONAL 101/102 Seminar 0/0 credits 

I H F. R A I» "S (OT) Introduction to the values, attitudes, and abilities necessary 

for success in the helping professions. An overview of 
occupational therapy practice areas designed to inform and 
prepare students for the demands of professional level study. 
Seminar: 3 hours/month 
Prerequisite: Pre-OT classification. 101 Fall; 102 Spring 

203 Human Development and 

Occupational Performance 3 credits 

A study of the development and maturation of occupational 

performance across the life span. Field study focuses on 

normal populations to integrate how basic human needs are 

met through purposeful occupation. 

Lecture: 3 hours. Field Study: 2-4 hours. 

Students provide own transportation to and from field study 

sites. 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Professional OT program 

Corequisite: OT 209. Fall 

204 History, Philosophy & Functions 3 credits 

Introduction to the profession through a study of its history, 

theories and philosophies, and prominent figures in its 

development. Professional ethics and specific functions of 

OT in various settings are integrated. 

Lecture: 3 hours. Field Study 2-4 hours. 

Students provide own transportation to and from field stud> 

sites. 

Prerequisite: OT 203. 

Corequisite: OT 210. Spring 

209/210 Occupational Processes & 

Analysis I— II 2 credits each 

Laboratory study of purposeful occupation as a need 
satisfier across the life span. Selected occupations in work, 
self-care, and play/leisure are practiced and analyzed to 
determine how they support development, wellness and 
holistic functioning. Principles of normal human 
development integrated through projects and field trips. 
Laboratory: 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Professional OT program. 
Corequisite for 209: OT 203, BIO 21 1. Fall 
Corequisite for 210: OT 204, BIO 212. Spring 

217 Concepts of Wellness 3 credits 

An examination of the developmental, biological, 
environmental and psychosocial aspects of wellness and 
those lifespan challenges which threaten the well state. 
Related terminology stressed. 
Lecture: 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Professional OT Program 
Corequisite: BIO 21 1, OT 209. OT 203. Fall 



140 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



OCCUPATIONAL 301 Intervention I 4 credits 

THERAPY (OT) Occupational therapy theory and techniques of intervention 

as applied to individuals whose occupational performance is 
limited or threatened by developmental challenges across the 
lifespan. 

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory/Seminar: 4 hours. 
Prerequisites: OT 204, OT 217 
Corequisites: OT 309, OT 317. Fall 

302 Intervention II 4 credits 

Occupational therapy theory and techniques of intervention 

as applied to individuals whose occupational performance is 

limited or threatened by physical challenges across the 

lifespan. 

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory/Seminar: 4 hours. 

Prerequisites: OT 301, OT 309. OT 317 

Corequisites: OT 310, OT 318. Spring 

309 Sensorimotor Processes and 

Occupational Performance 3 credits 

A study of sensory, perceptual and motor processes as they 

affect work, self-care, and play/leisure occupations. 

Concepts integrated into Intervention I Lab and Practicum I 

experiences. 

Lecture: 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 212 

Corequisites: OT 301, OT 317. Fall 

310 Movement, Measurement and 

Occupational Performance 3 credits 

A study of normal and abnormal motion and its 
measurement and analysis. Concepts integrated in 
Intervention II Lab and Practicum II experiences. 
Lecture: 3 hours 

Prerequisites: OT 301, OT 309, OT 317 
Corequisites: OT 302, OT 318. Spring 

317/318 Practicum I-II (Level I FWE) 1 credit each 

Experience observing and interacting with developmentally 

and physically challenged persons. Stress placed on 

associating theory and techniques of intervention to the 

practical setting. 

Students provide own transportation to and from practicum 

sites. 

Practicum: 6-8 field hours/week 

Corequisites for 317: OT 301, OT 309 

Corequisites for 318: OT 302, OT 310 

Fall/Spring 



14 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



OCCUPATIONAL 401 Intervention III 4 credits 

THERAPY (OT) Occupational therapy theory and techniques of intervention 

as applied to individuals whose occupational performance is 

limited or threatened by psychosocial challenges across the 

lifespan. 

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory/Seminar: 4 hours. 

Prerequisites: OT 203, OT 204, PSY 430 

Corequisites: OT 415. Fall 

415 Practicum III (Level I FEW) 1 credit 

Experience observing and interacting with individuals with 
psychosocial challenges. Association of theories and 
methods of intervention to the practical setting. Students 
provide own transportation to and from practicum sites. 
Practicum: 6-8 field hours/week 
Corequisite: OT 401. Fall 

419 Leadership 2 credits 

Concepts and skills essential to the promotion of the OT 
profession to include management, research, and 
presentation of self. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor 
Lecture: 1.5; Laboratory: 1. Fall 

*440 Field Work in Psycho-social 

Intervention (Level II FWE) 6 credits 

Three months of full-time experience practicing the skills of 

the entry level therapist under the supervision of a 

registered occupational therapist. 

Students provide own room, board and transportation if not 

provided by affiliated agency. 

Prerequisite: Completion of all academic and practicum 

requirements. 

Spring, Summer 

*444 Field Work in Physical-social 

Intervention (Level II FWE) 6 credits 

Three months of full-time experience practicing the skills of 

the entry level therapist under the supervision of a 

registered occupational therapist. 

Students provide own room, board and transportation if not 

provided by affiliated agency. 

Prerequisite: Completion of all academic and practicum 

requirements. 

Spring, Summer 

446 Special Interest Field Work (optional) variable credit 

A field work placement in an area of special interest such as 
hand rehabilitation, geriatrics, pediatrics, administration, 
etc. Not required for graduation or certification. 
Prerequisite: Completion of all graduation requirements to 
include OT 440 and 444. 



142 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



OCCUPATIONAL 480 Special Topics variable credit 

THERAPY (OT) Elective study related to a special area of interest in 

occupational therapy. 

Prerequisite: Permission of advisor. 



*OT 440/444 may be completed in one setting provided that 
the facility is capable of managing a continuous 6 month 
fieldwork experience following the program's guidelines and 
requirements, and the Accreditation Essentials. 



4 3 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHILOSOPHY (PHI.) 



101 Contemporary Self-images 3 credits 

This course examines the defining ideas of our culture and 
the modern age. Its aim is to nurture critical reflection on 
the dominant intellectual schemes that shape current 
understanding of one's self and the world. It does so by 
grounding class discussions around a series of challenges 
modernity poses for tradition. This course is a core 
requirement; it is also offered in the honors colloquia. 
Fall/Spring 



The confrontation between modernity and tradition raises 
profound problems of a generally human, and, more 
specifically, religious and moral kind. The core electives are 
structured to allow for a continuity of analysis of such 
issues in Philosophy of Person, Philosophy of Religion, and 
Ethics. 

Ethics 3 credits 

Ethics is a discipline which imparts or seeks knowledge of 
the Tightness or wrongness of voluntary action and its 
consequences. The application of ethical theory to different 
sets of problems allows for a variety of topical presentations 
which are outlined below: 

Variations 

222 Medical Ethics 

The course explores the ethical questions related to modern 
science and the health profession. Topics such as abortion, 
human experimentation, genetic engineering, behavior 
control and the delivery of health care are analyzed. 
Fall/Spring 

223 Social Ethics 

An examination of the leading ethical theories in normati\e 
discourse, including utilitarianism and non-consequentialism; 
the application of theories to such social problems as 
suicide, euthanasia, abortion, punishment, and 
environmental issues. Fall, on demand 

224 Business Ethics 

The general principles of ethics applied to the free 
enterprise system. Capitalism, social justice, the role of 
government in business. 
Spring, on demand or every other year 



257 Philosophy of Religion 3 credits 

A philosophical inquiry into the nature of religion and the 
objects of thought and feeling associated with religion, such 
as the nature and existence of God, the nature of religious 
experience and symbolism, evil, transcendence, creation. 
immortality. This course is both part of the Honors 
Colloquia and a core elective. Fall 



144 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHILOSOPHY (PHL) 260 Practical Logic 3 credits 

The application of logical principles, techniques of critical 
thought and argumentation to the needs of everyday life. 
Emphasis on assessing the legitimacy of arguments, 
detecting common fallacies, evaluating evidence, and 
improving skills in reasoning. This course is a core elective. 
Fall/Spring On demand 

261 Philosophy of Women 3 credits 

A philosophical examination of the literature and central 
issues of the women's liberation movement. 
On demand 

270 Social and Political Philosophy 3 credits 

An exploration of issues pertaining to the order of human 
life in civil society. Study of social and political writings; 
literary, philosophical, and religious works that express 
politically relevant concepts of the human person and the 
world. On demand 

290 Philosophy of Person 3 credits 

A dominantly phenomenological approach to analyzing the 
existential structures that constitute a person. Exploration of 
the possibilities for personal growth and evaluation of the 
various social forces that limit these possibilities. This 
course is a core elective. 
Spring, on demand 

413 Philosophy Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community. 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 

485 Special Topics 1-3 credits 

Topics may vary from semester to semester and will be 
announced with preregistration information and course 
hours. 



45 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHYSICAL EDI CAI ION I (THE) 105 Archery 1 credit 

Instruction in basic target archery techniques, including 
the low method of anchoring and the bowsight methods of 
aiming. Fundamentals of selection and care of equipment; 
basic safety procedures. 

107/108 Dance: An Experience in 

Creative Movement 1 credit each 

A study of relaxation and tension, breathing and 
coordination. Creative, spontaneous reaction as a base for 
directed improvisations. 

110 Badminton 1 credit 

Instruction in the basic skills of badminton: serves, clear, 
smash, drop, drive and net shots. Rules and basic strategy of 
singles and doubles in recreational and tournament 
situations. 

1 15 Bowling 1 credit 

Techniques and skills of stance, approach, aim, delivery and 
etiquette of bowling. Language and rules of the sport. 
Additional costs. 

120 Gymnastics 1 credit 

Fundamental gymnastic skills, spotting techniques, safety 
procedures and nomenclature for women's Olympic events. 

125 Racquetball 1 credit 

Fundamentals of the game, including history, rules, 
stroking, techniques and game tactics. Practice in singles and 
doubles play in competitive situations. 

130 Tennis 1 credit 

The basic spin serve, forehand and backhand drives, 
forehand and backhand volleys. Knowledge of theory 
involved in stroke production; concepts of placement and 
speed of the ball; progression for learning each stroke; rules 
and scoring systems for singles and doubles; basic strategy 
of singles and doubles. The significance and value of sport 
tennis as a cultural mode. 

135 Special Physical Education 1 credit 

A program of physical activities for students with 
limitations which preclude their participation in regular 
classes. Enrollment based on physician's recommendation or 
a limitation identified by the student or an instructor. 
Program is individualized to meet student's needs. 



_46 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PHE) 140 Skiing 1 credit 

Series of eight lessons at a nearby ski school. Instruction 
for students who have little or no skiing experience, 
including proper use of equipment, safety, use of lifts, 
progressive development of parallel ski technique to the 
point of doing smooth linked turns. 

145 Volleyball 1 credit 

Instruction and practice in basic skills including the 
underhand and overhand serve, set, bump, one-hand dig, 
spike and block. Rules, basic offensive and defensive 
strategy and sociocultural aspects of the sport are discussed. 

150 Personal Development 1 credit 

Development of programs of exercise and activity based on 
individual assessment of status, needs and goals. Students 
are enabled to determine realistic goals for their own 
development and use of activity throughout life. 

155 Softball 1 credit 

The nature and scope of softball; understanding and 
application of rules. Execution of basic softball skills and 
application of basic game strategy. 

413 Physical Education 

Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community. 



47 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHYSICS (PHY) 101/102 Radiologic Physics I - 1 1 3 credits each 

Structure of matter; basic electricity and magnetism; X-ray 
properties, production and interaction with matter; X-ray 
circuit. 
Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall Spring 

107/108 Introductory Physics I — 1 1 3 credits each 

An appreciation of the world of physics for non-science 
majors. Classical physics topics which illustrate the history, 
method and application of physics. Emphasis on modern 
physics. 

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: Equivalent of 2yr. H.S. algebra. Fall/Spring 

131 Physical Science 3 credits 

A survey of physical science including astronomy, chemistry 

and physics. 

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall 

221/222 General Physics 4 credits each 

Fundamentals of mechanics, heat, wave motion, light, and 

magnetism. 

Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: MTH 151. Fall/Spring 

341 Modern Physics 3 credits 

Introduction to atomic and nuclear physics including the 
Bohr atom, spectra, X-rays, matter waves, radioactivity, 
nuclear energy, relativity. 
Lecture: 3 hours. 
Offered on demand 

413 Physics Cooperative Education 3-6 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community. 
Offered on demand 



148 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



POLITICAL SCIENCE (POL) 



100 American National Government 3 credits 

A study of the national government, its structure, powers, 

functions and roles within the American Political system. 

Emphasis is placed on the Constitution and democratic 

processes. 

Part of core curriculum. Fall/Spring 



251/252 Law Seminar I-II 3 credits each 

Introduction to the legal system and legal profession; the 
role of lawyers and judges in American society; the courts 
and judicial process; policy making; legal research and 
procedures; the use of law books; legal terms; decision 
making; litigation; case analysis. 

Correlated field instruction and field experiences included. 
Alternate years: Fall 1989, 1990 Spring 1990, 1992 

405/406 American Constitutional Law I-II 3 credits each 

A case method survey of the organic role of the United 
States Supreme Court in the total process of the American 
constitutional system. Emphasis on governmental structure 
and relationships. 
Alternate years: Fall 1990, 1992 Spring 1991, 1993 

413 Political Science Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 

community. 

On demand 

450/451 Internship 3 credits each 

Directed field experiences for advanced students in law 

offices or law related agencies. Weekly College conferences 

coordinate theoretical knowledge with field observation and 

practical experiences. 

Prerequisite: Permission of program director. 

On demand 



480/481 Independent Study 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 
On demand 



1-3 credits each 



Special Topics 3-6 credits 

Topic may vary from semester to semester and will be 
announced with preregistration information and course 
hours. On demand 



149 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) 



123 Introduction to Psychology 3 credits 

A survey of the science of contemporary psychology, its 
methods, findings, theoretical foundations and practical 
applications. Topics include biological basis of behavior, 
developmental processes, perception, learning, motivation, 
personality, social behavior and abnormal behavior. 
Fall/Spring 



224 Organizational and Industrial Psychology 3 credits 

Investigation of organizational behavior, personnel and 
industrial psychology, with emphasis on utilization of basic 
psychological theory to make organizations more effective. 
Topics include personnel selection, performance appraisal, 
training employees and managers, leadership and supervi- 
sion, communication, motivation, attitudes and job satis- 
faction. Prerequisite: PSY 123 or permission of instructor. 
On demand 

232 Research Methods 3 credits 

Development of appreciation for the scientific method as 
applied to the behavioral sciences. The language of science, 
concepts, propositions, hypotheses, models, theories and 
empirical laws. Analysis of the concepts of experimental, 
correlational and case study methods. Prepares skills in 
conducting scientific literature, review and conducting 
survey research. 
Prerequisites: PSY 123, MTH 115. Fall/Spring 

275 Child and Adolescent Psychology 3 credits 
Study of the relationship between physiological and 
psychological growth of the individual from infancy through 
adolescence. Emphasis on the theoretical formulations of 
child and adolescent development relative to emotional and 
cognitive processes. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123 or permission of instructor. 
Fall/Spring 

276 Psychology of Aging 3 credits 
Survey of the psychological impact of age-related changes 
that occur between early and late maturity. Areas of study 
include changes in perceptual abilities, intellect and learning 
capacities in late life; personality changes and emotional 
dimensions of late life; adjustment to retirement; role 
changes; and environmental issues which contribute to 
psychological health. Summer, every second year 



280 Tests and Measurements 3 credits 

Development of skills necessary to determine the adequ 
of testing instruments. Topics include personality measures, 
interest tests, IQ scales, achievement tests and aptitude tests. 
Summary of measurement statistics provided, but students 
are encouraged to take MTH 1 15, Basic Statistics, as 
background. On demand 



150 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) 285 Communication Skills: Interviewing 

and Recording Techniques 3 credits 

Development of skills that may be useful in working 
directly with clients and others, including listening for 
emotions, monitoring one's own reactions and responses, 
building a client-worker relationship which can foster 
constructive change in the client. 
Fall/Spring 

330 Personality 3 credits 

Survey of the various theories of development, structure and 

characteristics of personality. Freudian theory, behavioral, 

humanistic and existential viewpoints, trait theorists and 

others are explored. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123 or permission of instructor. 

Fall, every second year 

334 Maladaptive Behavior 3 credits 

Study of both professional and popular theories regarding 
mental illness and abnormal behavior. Exploration of 
chronology of abnormal behavior theories and treatments 
from demonology and phrenology to psychophysiology and 
chemotherapy, from madness and demonic possession to 
modern day viewpoints. Comparative study of the medical, 
behavioral and social models of mental disorder. 
Prerequisite: PSY 123 or permission of instructor. 
Fall/Spring 

342 Educational Psychology 3 credits 

Focuses on psychoeducational theories which explain the 
teaching/learning process. Applications of various learning 
theories are discussed. Cross registration with EDU 200. 
Fall 

350 Social Psychology 3 credits 

Study of the relationships between individuals, and between 
individuals and groups or institutions. Topics include 
attribution of responsibility, interpersonal attraction, social 
influence, attitude change, characteristics and effects of 
crowds, and determinants of behavior. 
Prerequisite: PSY 123 or permission of instructor. 
Spring, every second year 

381 Special Topics 1-3 credits 

Topics may vary from semester to semester and will be 
announced with preregistration information and course 
hours. On demand 

413 Psychology Cooperative Education 3 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 

community. 

On demand 



51 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) 



431 Learning and Behavior Modification 3 credits 

Review of major learning theories including classical and 
operant conditioning, and social learning theory. Emphasis 
on appropriate use of behavior modification techniques by 
parents, teachers, social workers, health care professionals. 
Students learn to use behavior modification techniques and 
practice them throughout the course. Prerequisite: PSY 123 
or permission of instructor. 
Spring, every second year 



452 Counseling and Psychotherapy 3 credits 

Emphasis on treatment of psychopathology, including 
discussion of such approaches as psychoanalysis, Rogerian 
therapy, gestalt, rational, emotive and behavior therap\. 
primal scream therapy, transactional analysis, drug therapy, 
shock therapy, psychosurgery and religious counseling. 
Study of the current research on the effectiveness of the 
various therapies. 

Prerequisites: PSY 123, PSY 430, or permission of instructor. 
Fall, every second year 



470/471 Advanced Seminars in Psychology 3 credits each 

To enable students of advanced standing to explore in detail 
specific sub-areas within the field of psychology. Topics 
will vary; readings and group discussion. Paper usually 
required. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
On demand 



52 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



RADIOGRAPHY (RDT) 



100 Freshman Seminar credit 

Introduction to the Radiography profession inclusive of the 
historical development, specialties within the field, and 
organizational structure of the department. Employment 
opportunities are also discussed. The course emphasizes the 
radiography profession in order to assist the student in 
making a commitment to the professional level. 
Lecture: 1 hour. Fall 



106 Medical Terminology 1 credit 

Anatomical names of bones and organs of the body and 
other descriptive terms and their common abbreviations; 
prefixes and suffixes, proper usage, spelling and 
interpretation of terms. 
Lecture: 1 hour. Fall 

112 Methods of Patient Care 2 credits 

Communication, asepsis, body mechanics, vital signs, 
emergencies, drug administration and isolation technique. 
Lecture: 2 hours. Fall 

115 Radiologic Positioning I 4 credits 

Introduction to terminology and fundamental principles of 
positioning. Emphasis on need for different views to 
maintain correct detail and proportion of parts; avoidance of 
magnification, distortion and super-imposition of structures; 
topographic and radiographic anatomy of upper and lower 
extremities, chest, bony thorax, abdomen vertebral column, 
and contrast media. 
Lecture: 4 hours 
Corequisite: BIO 127. Fall 

116 Radiologic Positioning Lab I 1 credit 

Practical application of positioning: upper and lower 

extremity, chest, bony thorax, abdomen, vertebrae column 

and contrast media. 

Laboratory: 2 hours 

Prerequisite: BIO 127. Corequisite: RDT 115. Fall 

117 Radiologic Positioning II 2 credits 

Topographic and radiologic anatomy of the skull and skull 

positioning. 

Lecture: 2 hours 

Prerequisites: RDT 106, RDT 115, BIO 127. Spring 



118 Radiologic Positioning Lab II 1 credit 

Practical application of positioning cranial anatomy. 
Laboratory: 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: RDT 115, RDT 116 
Corequisite: RDT 117. Spring 



53 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



RADIOGRAPHY (RDT) 



120 Radiologic Technique I 3 credits 

History of radiology, darkroom procedures, protection, 
exposure factors and film critique. 
Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Spring 

122 Radiologic Technique II 2 credits 

Mathematical conversion of exposure factors, proper use of 

grids, film critique. 

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 1 hour 

Prerequisite: RDT 120. Fall 

140 Clinical Experience I 2 credits 

Orientation to the clinical setting, equipment familiarization, 
application of theoretical principles through examination of 
patients under direct supervision. Film critique. 16 hours per 
week. 

Prerequisites: RDT 106, RDT 115, RDT 112, RDT 120. 
CPR certification, annual health examination, current 
liability insurance, and verification of observation. 
Spring 

155 Clinical Experience II 3 credits 

Continuation of RDT 140. Experience in perfecting the 
application of ionizing radiation under supervision. 
32 hours per week. 

Prerequisites: RDT 117, RDT 118, RDT 122, RDT 140, 
RDT 210. CPR certification, annual health examination, & 
current liability insurance. Summer 

210 Sophomore Registry Seminar credit 

Review of RDT 106, 112, BIO 127 from the Fall Semester, 
as well as review of concurrent courses during the spring 
semester: RDT 115, 120 and BIO 128. 
Lecture: 1 hour. 
Prerequisites: RDT 106, 112. 
Corequisites: RDT 115, 116, 120, BIO 128. Spring 

215 Radiation Biology and Protection 3 credits 

A study of the effects of ionizing radiation on living matter; 
changes in the biochemistry, micro and macro-morphology, 
genetics and embryology which are produced by ionizing 
radiation in order to fully understand topics such as patient 
protection, personnel protection, maximum permissable dose, 
exposure monitoring. 
Prerequisite: RDT 155. Fall 

221 Special Radiographic Procedures 2 credits 

History and equipment, neuroradiography, angiography, 
bronchography, hysterosalpingography, arthrograpy. 
subtraction and xerography. 
Lecture: 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: BIO 127 and 128. Spring 



54 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



RADIOGRAPHY (RDT) 



225 Clinical Experience III 2 credits 

Continuation of RDT 155, including special procedures and 
pediatric radiography. 16 hours per week. 
Prerequisite: RDT 155, CPR certification, annual health 
examination, and current liability insurance. Fall 

245 Clinical Experience IV 3 credits 

Practical application of theory and skills acquired in all 
phases of the curriculum. Continuation of RDT 225. 
24 hours per week. 

Prerequisites: RDT 225. CPR certification, annual health 
examination, and current liability insurance. Spring 

247 Radiologic Pathology 1 credit 

A study of disease: congenital, trauma, bacterial and viral 
disorders, neoplastic and degenerative. Conditions of illness 
and their effects on systems of the human body. 
Lecture: 1 hour. 

Prerequisites: RDT 115 and BIO 127 for Radiography 
majors. All others must be in the field of Allied Health or 
other related disciplines. Spring 



255 Clinical Experience V 3 credits 

Continuation of RDT ,245. 32 hours per week. 
Prerequisite: RDT 245, RDT 310. CPR certification, annual 
health examination, and current liability insurance. 
Optional minor rotation or internship in specialty areas 
available. Summer 



265 Clinical Experience VI 

Continuation of RDT 255. 16 hours per week. 
Prerequisites: RDT 255. Fall 



2 credits 



275 Clinical Experience VII 2 credits 

Final phases of the clinical component. Advanced practical 
application of theory and skills learned in the entire 
program. 16 hours per week. 
Prerequisite: RDT 265. Spring 

290 Introduction to Cross-Sectional 

Anatomy for Radiographers 3 credits 

A general overview of cross-sectional anatomy as it applies 
to Radiology. Emphasis on identifying anatomical structures 
as they relate to Cat Scan (CT) and Magnetic Resonance 
Imaging (MRI). Lecture: 2 1/2 hrs 

Prerequisites: BIO 127, BIO 128, or college level anatomy 
course. Fall 

310 Junior Registry Seminar credit 

Comprehensive review of all RDT and related courses in 
order to prepare for the Registry certification. Lecture: 1 
hour. Prerequisites: RDT 117, 118, 122, 200. 
Corequisites: RDT 247, 448. Spring 



155 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



RADIOGRAPHY (RDT) 



410 Senior Registry Seminar credit 

Continued comprehensive review of all RDT and related 
courses as preparation for the National Registry 
Certification. Lecture: 1 hour. 

Prerequisites: RDT 221, 448. Corequisite: RDT 275. 
Spring 



413 Radiography Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 

community. 

To be arranged. 

445 Radiology Management 3 credits 

An introduction to management as it applies specifically to 
the field of radiography with emphasis on staffing, 
management styles, interviewing and evaluating processes, 
disciplining employees, and the importance of credentialing. 
Lecture: 2 1/2 hours. 
Prerequisite: RDT 255. Fall 



448 Quality Control 3 credits 

Examination of factors affecting radiographic quality and 

methods used to test, evaluate and ensure radiographic 

quality. 

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: RDT 122. Spring 



56 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES (RLS) 



Note: Students are required to take two (2) courses from the 
100 level category to fulfill their religious studies core 
requirement. 

100 Biblical Studies 3 credits 

Biblical Studies is the study of selected Christian scriptures 
toward development of an awareness of what the Biblical 
authors meant to communicate to their contemporaries with 
special attention paid to literary forms, sociological factors 
and historical settings. The course focuses attention on the 
New Testament while showing how the Hebrew Bible 
influenced and was utilized by first century Christians. 
Fall/Spring 

103 Moral Theology 3 credits 

A study of human conduct within the Christian context. 
Central issues such as the sources and nature of moral 
obligations, personal and social responsibility, freedom and 
sinfulness, are addressed. Also, contemporary moral 
problems are presented and critically analyzed. 
Summer, every second year 

104 World Religions 3 credits 

World Religions is the study of religions drawn from many 
areas of the world. The course may include study of Islam, 
Buddhism, Hinduism, Macumba, Taoism, etc. The religions 
will be considered in light of their history, their central 
beliefs, their main devotional or meditative practices and 
their art. While students will be expected to compare and 
contrast the religions studied, the course is not intended to 
argue for the superiority of one or another religion. 
Fall/Spring 

106 Theology and Human Experience 3 credits 

The course provides students with the theological foundation 
necessary for relating with human experience by addressing 
the major resources of the Christian faith, scripture and 
tradition, cultural influences and experience. 
Fall/Spring 

111 Christology 3 credits 

Historical, scriptural and theological insights into the 
actuation of the Jesus event in one's personal life, in the 
Church, and in contemporary world experience. 
Fall/Spring 

113 Theology of the Church 3 credits 

Explores the nature and purpose of Christian community 
from a historical, biblical and theological perspective with 
special reference to the relationship between ministerial 
practice and theological understanding in the contemporary 
Christian experience. Fall, every second year 



57 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES (RLS) 



115 Religion in America 3 credits 

This is an historically oriented study of forms of religion 
found in America including Catholicism, Judaism and a 
variety of forms of Protestantism. Areas of study will 
include the pattern of American religious history from the 
Puritans, through the revivals, to the present day and the 
factors of history, organization, creed and practice which 
differentiate denominations. Particular attention will be paid 
to groups outside the Mainline denominations, e.g. Mormons, 
Mennonites, Pentacostals, Hare Krishnas. 
Fall, every second year 



200 Sacramental Theology 3 credits 

The study of the sacraments as basic symbols shared within 
the Christian community. 
On demand 

204 Selected Studies in Women and Religion 3 credits 

An historical and theological survey of women in the Judeo- 
Christian tradition. Emphasis will be given to the role of 
women in scripture and in the church with special focus on 
the changing role of women in the church and in society 
today. 
On demand 

206 Islam 3 credits 

A study of the faith and practice of the Islamic religion, 
including the role of the prophet Mohammed; the Koran; the 
Five Pillars of Islam; and Sunni, Shi'ite and Sufi Muslims. A 
survey of strong historical and political emphasis, tracing the 
Islamic world from its rise, through the golden age, into the 
present. 
On demand 

208 Selected New Testament Topics 3 credits 

In-depth study of a particular New Testament author or 
school, e.g., John and the Joannine School, Luke, Paul, the 
Pauline School, etc. Examination of attitudes toward Judaism 
and the Mosaic Law, the Gentile mission and Gentile 
Christianity. Theological structures, especially Christology 
and Ecclesiology. 
On demand 



220 Origins of Christianity 3 credits 

A survey of the first four centuries of the Christian 
movement, from the time of Jesus through the time when 
Christianity became the official religion of the Roman 
Empire. The development of orthodoxy. Christian schools of 
thought including Gnosticism, Marcionism and the rise of 
Manicheism. 
On demand 



58 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES (RLS) 



224 Practicum in Christian Ministry 3 credits 

Integration of pastoral practice and theological insight. 
Processes of theological reflection explored within the 
context of pastoral ministry. Theological study, pastoral 
field placement and evaluation. 
On demand 



227 Eastern Religions 3 credits 
Study of such topics as Yoga, Enlightenment, the Buddha, 
the Tao, and the thoughts of Mao Tse-Tung as well as the 
religious questions asked by the cultures of India, China, 
and Japan. 

On demand 

228 Theology of Mary 3 credits 

The role of Mary in the contemporary Church from an 
historical, social and theological perspective. 
On demand 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Qualified advanced students may arrange independent study 
in areas not covered by existing courses. The permission of 
the involved faculty is required before Independent Study 
may be pursued. 
On demand 



485 Special Topics 1-3 credits 

This offering allows students the opportunity to pursue the 
investigation of a selected topic. Topic may vary from 
semester to semester and will be announced with pre- 
registration information and course outlines. 
On demand 



59 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SOCIAL WORK (SWK) 



103 Community Service 3 credits 

Practical experience in helping people and the 
community, understanding human needs and assessing 
potential for human services professions. 
Lecture combined with 4 hours per week in community 
service. Course open to all students. 
Prerequisite: None. Fall 



222 Drug Pharmacology 3 credits 

A comprehensive understanding of drug pharmacology and 
its effect on the user. The course will include examination 
of such topics as classifications of drugs, synergistic effects 
of drugs on the body, drug tolerance and dependence, and 
the over-the-counter pharmaceutical industry. 
Fall 

232 Research Methods 3 credits 

Appreciation of the scientific method as applied to the 
behavioral sciences and social work. The language of science, 
concepts, propositions, models, hypotheses and empirical 
laws. Analysis of concepts of the experimental, correlational 
and case study methods. Critical reading of research; 
introduction to research activities. 
Prerequisite: MTH 115 Basic Statistics I. Fall/Spring 

251 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 credits 

Introduction to the field of social work and the social 
welfare system in the United States. Focuses on the historical 
and philosophical antecedents of present day social welfare 
programs and the development of social work as a 
profession. 
Prerequisite: SOC 110 or permission of instructor. Fall 



252 Social Welfare Policies and Services 3 credits 

A systems approach to the study and assessment of 
contemporary social welfare programs. Focuses on the 
interplay of social, political and economic forces that 
influence the planning and implementation of social welfare 
services. 
Prerequisite: SWK 251 or permission of instructor. Spring 

285 Communication Skills: Interviewing 

and Recording Techniques 3 credits 

Development of skills useful in working directly with clients 
and others. Listening for emotions, monitoring one's own 
reactions and responses, building a client/worker relationship 
that will foster constructive change in the client. 
Prerequisite: PSY 123, SOC 121 
Fall 



.60 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SOCIAL WORK (SWK) 



333 Substance Abuse in the Adolescent Population 3 credits 

A study of the special problems of the adolescent substance 
abuser. Correlates which add impetus to the progression of 
the problem will be examined. Emphasis will be on early 
identification and detection as key components in initiating 
intervention strategies. Fall, every other year 



335 Substance Abuse in Special Populations 3 credits 

A multi-faceted look at the myriad of special populations 
affected by substance abuse. Emphasis will be on cross- 
cultural influences and the role they play in contributing to 
substance abuse. Spring 

337 Substance Abuse Treatment Methods 3 credits 

An examination and critique of the many treatment 
resources and methods which have been developed during 
the last twenty years. Discussion will include but not be 
limited to such treatment methods as psychotherapy with 
individuals and groups, drug therapy, family and network 
therapy, detoxification and behavioral therapy. Spring 

339 Substance Abuse and Criminality 3 credits 

An examination of the correlation between substance abuse 
and criminality. This course will analyze the theoretical 
models of the substance abuse/crime relationship and its 
societal implications. Topics to be explored will include 
drugs and street crime, DUI, interdiction strategies, 
urinalysis testing, and substance abuse and family violence. 
Summer, every other year 

340 Alcoholism 3 credits 

An introduction to the diagnosis and treatment of 
alcoholism. Emphasis is placed on comtemporary beliefs 
and attitudes toward alcohol, effects upon the family and 
implications for treatment. 
Summer, every other year 



341 Substance Abuse and the Aged 3 credits 

Focuses on the use patterns, diagnosis and treatment 
methods specific to the aged substance abuser. Issues 
examined will include misuse and abuse of prescription 
drugs, behavior and risk factors, factors related to 
underdiagnosis, and relationship to depression and suicide. 
Fall, every other year 

353/354 Social Work Methods and Processes I- II 3 credits each 

Skills in social work intervention will be developed, 

including case work, group work, community organization, 

assessment, goals and methods of implementation of large 

and small group theory. A study of the social worker's role 

as advocate and change agent. 

SWK 251 and 353 prerequisite for SWK 354 

Fall/Spring 



61 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SOCIAL WORK (SWK) 



356 Social Casework Practice 3 credits 

Examination of social work delivery services in the one-to- 
one relationship. Emphasis on casework skills, case record 
writing and analysis, and creative problem solving based on 
behavioral science data and observed needs. 
Prerequisite: SWK 103, SWK 251, SWK 285. 
Spring, every other year 



358 Counseling the Older Adult 3 credits 

A social work practice course with emphasis on individual 
and group counseling techniques for older persons with 
emotional and social difficulties. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Spring, every other year 



360 
361 



Special Topics in Social Work Practice 



1-3 credits 



Special Topics in Social Work Policy 1-3 credits 

Content of these courses varies from semester to semester in 
keeping with student and faculty interest. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. On demand 



363 Child Welfare Services 3 credits 

The history and current provision of services to children in 
need of care because of neglect, abuse or lack of family 
support. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall, every other year 

365 Social Work with Groups 3 credits 

Group work as a method of effecting change in the 
individual. Discussion of group structure and processes; 
interventive techniques used by group workers. Experiential 
learning. Prerequisite: SWK 353 and SWK 354, or permission 
of instructor. On demand 

371 Field Instruction I 3 credits 

Students work in a community agency two days per week 
for one semester, under the supervision of an agency person 
and a member of the social work faculty. Students 
participate fully in agency activities. 
Prerequisite: SWK 103, SWK 252, SWK 285, SWK 353 
Fall/Spring 

375 Aging Policies and Programs 3 credits 

Analysis of causes, intent and results of policy decisions as 
they are experienced as programs and services for the 
elderly. Discussion of policies affecting income, health care, 
social services and volunteerism. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall 



390/391 Seminar 3 credits each 

Analysis of special areas of social work. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. On demand 



162 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SOCIAL WORK (SWK) 



392 Child Abuse and Neglect 3 credits 

A practice oriented course for students who intend to work 
in a protective service role. Abuse and neglect: causes, legal 
sanctions for intervention, treatment approaches, case 
planning and services. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Fall, every other year 

395 Foster, Residential and Adoptive Care 3 credits 

Assessment, case planning and the provision of services in 
foster care, in residential facilities, and for child adoption. 
Prerequisite: SWK 363 or permission of instructor. 
Spring, every other year 

413 Social Work Cooperative Education 3-6 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community. On demand 

452 Adaptive Behavior 3 credits 

Integration of knowledge from sociology and psychology 
with social work and other helping professions. 
Environmental factors, systems theories and psychosocial 
development during the life cycle of the individual are 
studied. 

Prerequisites: SWK 103, SWK 332, SWK 231, SWK 252, 
SWK 353, SWK 354, SWK 285, SWK 371, SWK 475, 
SWK 476. Spring 

472/473 Field Instruction Seminar 1 credit 

474 Weekly seminar for students involved in field instruction; 
for duration of field placement. Integration of theoretical 
knowledge with practical field experiences. Student case 
materials and experiences discussed. 
Corequisite: Field instruction course. Fall/Spring 

475/476 Field Instruction II- III 3 credits each 

Two days a week for two semesters, senior social work 
students practice in a social service agency. Practice 
supervised by agency representative; education directed by 
social work faculty. Direct service to clients. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall/Spring 

477 Field Instruction IV 6 credits 

An alternative to SWK-476 in cases where block placements 
are more valuable. Senior social work students work full 
time in an agency for eight to ten weeks for one semester. 
Practice supervised by an agency representative; education 
directed by social work faculty member. Direct service to 
clients. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall/Spring 



480 Independent Study 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 
On demand 



1-3 credits 



163 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SOCIOLOGY (SOC) 110 Anthropology 3 credits 

Basic principles of human cultural and physical evolutionary 
development. Emphasis on range and variability of human 
cultures through examination of selected African, Asiatic, 
Native and Oceanic societies. Social change, social 
stratification, culture and personality, culture and language, 
ethnocentrism, cultural relativism and social control. 
Fulfills Anthropology core requirement. Fall/Spring 

121 Principles of Sociology 3 credits 

Lecture/discussion format introduces students to the 

conceptual and methodological tools of scientific analysis of 

human interactions, social behaviors and social processes. 

Sociological perspective, empirical studies and theoretical 

viewpoints. 

Spring, every other year 

122 Social Problems 3 credits 
An analysis of the theory of social problems. Emphasis on 
the factors which cause social problems, particularly in the 
American culture. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Spring 

221 Cultural Minorities 3 credits 

This course explores the nature of majority-minority 
relations as it relates to people of color in American society. 
Majority-minority relationships will be examined from the 
sociological perspective, which identifies majority status as 
one of dominance and minority status as one of 
subordination. In doing so, students will identify and analyze 
those historical, psycho-social, and socio-structural factors 
which have contributed to the making of minority groups 
and to the perpetuation of prejudice and racism. Majority- 
minority relationships in the United States will be illustrated 
by studying the social experience of four selected groups: 
Black Americans, Native Americans, Mexican Americans, 
and Puerto Rican Americans. Students will be expected to 
apply their knowledge of both the strengths which minority 
groups develop and the negative stressors which minority 
groups face to their own future professional roles. 
Prerequisite: SOC 110 Anthropology. Fall Spring 

321 The Family 3 credits 

A study of the family as a social institution. A multiple 
disciplinary approach drawing from sociology, anthropology, 
psychology and economics. Family patterns of organization, 
disorganization and reorganization in contemporary 
America. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or permission of instructor. 
Fall/Spring 



164 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SOCIOLOGY (SOC) 392/393 Seminar 3 credits each 

Analysis of special areas of sociology or anthropology. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
On demand 

413 Sociology Cooperative Education 3-6 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 
community. Fall/Spring 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 
On demand 



165 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SPECIAL EDUCATION (SED) 100 Exceptional Children 3 credits 

Definitions of exceptional children, their characteristics, the 
methods used to identify their learning needs and the types 
of educational programs available. Topics include special 
education, mental retardation, learning disabilities, social and 
emotional disturbance, speech and language impairments, 
vision handicaps, hearing handicaps, physical handicaps, and 
giftedness. 
Fall/Spring/Summer 

200 'Policy/Procedure in Special Education 3 credits 

Introduces students to the legal framework of special 
education. Major legislation and litigation which affect 
special education are reviewed. Students are introduced to 
federal, state, and local education policy and procedure and 
how to write individualized educational plans (IEP). 
Prerequisite: SED 100. Fall 

210 'Motor Development 3 credits 

Introduces students to neurological factors which affect 
motor development. Methods of promoting sequential motor 
skills in handicapped children are demonstrated. 
Prerequisite: SED 100. Fall 

244 'Characteristics of the Handicapped I 3 credits 
Study of exceptional children with severe mental retardation 
and physical handicaps. The causes and characteristics of 
intellectually and physically handicapping conditions are 
explained. Classification and diagnostic procedures are 
highlighted. Prerequisite: SED 100. Fall 

245 'Strategies MPH I 3 credits 

Develops diagnostic, prescriptive, instructional, and 
evaluative skills needed by teachers of "pre-academic level" 
children including those who are severely intellectually and/ 
or physically handicapped. 
Prerequisite: SED 244. Spring 

260 'Classroom Management 3 credits 

Develops competencies related to effective classroom 
management, discipline techniques and motivational 
practices. Various theoretically based strategies discussed. 
Operant techniques emphasized. 
Prerequisite: PSY 123 or EDU 200 (concurrent). Fall 

343 'Diagnosis of Learning Problems 3 credits 

Information on the purpose/assumptions of evaluation, 
descriptive statistics, a survey of tests used in education and 
social services, and the basis of test construction. Spring. 



166 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SPECIAL EDUCATION (SED) 



344 'Characteristics of the Handicapped II 3 credits 

Study of exceptional children with learning disabilities or 

social and emotional disturbances. The causes and 

characteristics of learning and behavioral problems are 

explored. Classification and diagnostic procedures are 

highlighted. 

Prerequisite: SED 100. Fall. 



345 'Strategies MPH II 3 credits 

Develops diagnostic, prescriptive, instructional, and 
evaluative skills needed by teachers of "academic level" 
children including those who are learning disabled and 
emotionally disturbed. 
Prerequisite: SED 344. Spring. 

372 'Vocational Habituation 3 credits 

Addresses career education of handicapped students. 
Emphasis on secondary education and post-school 
alternatives. Community resources are explored. 
Fall. 

375 'Issues in Special Education 3 credits 

Advanced special education majors use this seminar course 
to explore current issues in special education. Major oral 
and written presentations are required. 
Fall. 

400 'Parents of the Handicapped 3 credits 

Parenting styles and techniques are discussed and their 
impact on teaching and learning are explored. Parent- 
teacher communication issues are discussed and strategies 
developed. 
Spring. 

413 Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the 

community. 

On demand. 

480 'Independent Study 1-2 credits 

Students, with the assistance of faculty members, investigate 

selected topics. 

Fall, Spring, Summer 



485 'Special Topics . 1-2 credits 

Special education majors may take credits in special topics. 
These credits can be accumulated by taking special mini- 
courses such as: Working with Parents and Families of the 
Handicapped, Sign Language, Medical Procedures, 
Culturally Different Children, Community Agencies, etc. 
Fall/Spring 



167 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SPECIAL EDUCATION (SED) 495/497 'Student Teaching and Seminar 9 credits 

Students spend 15 weeks practice teaching in local schools 
under the guidance of an experienced teacher and a college 
supervisor. 

Weekly seminars are conducted. 
Fall/Spring 



Field Experiences credit 

Students are expected to spend one-half day per week each 
semester from the second semester of their freshman year to 
the first semester of their senior year observing and working 
in community classrooms or agencies. Course-related 
assignments are completed. Students in the Special 
Education program must complete 5 Special and 1 
Elementary Education Field Experiences. 



SED 601 Field Experience 1 

SED 602 Field Experience 2 

SED 603 Field Experience 3 

SED 604 Field Experience 4 

SED 605 Field Experience 5 

SED 606 Field Experience 6 



* Enrollment limited to Special Education Majors 



168 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Admission Requirements 



College Misericordia encourages applications from those who seek a 
strong liberal arts base for their chosen baccalaureate education and who 
present evidence of the ability and desire to pursue an academic program 
of study. 

Candidates for general admission to the College are reviewed on a rolling 
admissions basis by the Committee on Admissions. The decision to admit 
a student is based on the student's intended field of study and on an 
evaluation of the student's qualifications. 



General 
Admission 
to the 
Freshman Class 



Admission to 
the Alternative 
Learner's Project 

Admission 
of Transfer 
Students 



An applicant for admission who wishes to enter the freshman class should 
provide the Admissions Office with the following: 

1. Application for Admission with a non-refundable $15 fee. 

2. Official copy of the secondary school transcript forwarded to the 
Dean of Admissions by the Guidance Department of the secondary 
school. The transcript should indicate that the candidate has 
completed, or is in the process of completing, at least sixteen (16) 
Carnegie Units. The transcript should include current semester 
courses and all pertinent information regarding the student's 
educational background. Students who have secured a High School 
Equivalency Diploma may also be considered for admission. 

3. Test results of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College 
Entrance Examination Board or the American College Testing 
(ACT) Program are generally required for admission. Waiving of 
test requirements is made only by written permission from the 
Dean of Admissions. 

4. Although not required, a written recommendation from the high 
school principal or guidance counselor is encouraged. 

5. Handicapped students requiring special services must submit 
documentation of their handicapping condition. 

6. Personal interviews are not required. However, applicants are 
strongly encouraged to arrange for a personal interview and a tour 
of the campus. This interview and tour is especially important in 
the case of handicapped students. 

College Misericordia accepts a limited number of students each year into 
its ALP program for Learning Disabled Students. For information on this 
special program and the application process, please contact the Admissions 
Office at (717) 675-4449. 

College Misericordia welcomes students who wish to transfer from other 
accredited four-year colleges or universities, or two-year junior or 
community colleges. Students will be considered for admission if they 
have maintained a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better (based on a 4.0 
system). In some instances a GPA of 2.5 is required for advancement to 
the professional level. (See individual curriculum guides in front of 
catalog.) Candidates who meet the GPA requirements for general 
admission and who seek advanced standing for previous college work 
must provide the Dean of Admissions with the following: 



169 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Admission Requirements 



Admission 
of Transfer 
Students 

(cont.) 



1. Application for Admission with a non-refundable Si 5 fee. 

2. Official copy of secondary school transcript. 

3. Two (2) official transcripts from each college previously attended 
where credit has been earned. 

4. Statement of honorable dismissal from the college previously attended. 

5. Copy of a current catalog, indicating courses taken, from the 
institution previously attended. Admission of transfer students is 
based primarily on the applicant's academic performance at the 
institution attended previously. Transfer credit will be awarded for 
those courses that are equivalent to courses offered at College 
Misericordia. Normally, only grades of C" or better will be accepted 
for transfer credit. The registrar however reserves the right to award 
or withhold credit. 

Grades earned at other institutions are not included in the student's GPA 
at College Misericordia. 

Transfer students are encouraged to arrange an interview with an 
admissions counselor to review academic status and proposed curriculum. 



Transferring 
with an 
Associate Degree 



College Misericordia will accept all credits earned as requirements for the 
Associate Degree as indicated by the Official College Catalogue of the 
degree granting institution. Students normally must complete the Core 
Curriculum as required either directly or by reasonable substitution as 
prescribed by the College Misericordia Registrar in the course of 
transcript evaluation. 

In some cases, approved substitute courses may fulfill requirements of 
both core and major. Normally, no student with an Associate Degree in a 
related major will be required to complete more than 70 credits at College 
Misericordia. 

If the combined requirements of Core and Major exceed 70 credits, and 
if the Associate Degree is related to the intended major as determined by 
Registrar in conjunction with Division Chair, the following stipulations 
will apply: 

1. The student will not be permitted to declare a minor, a concentration 
or an area of emphasis; 

2. Priority will be given to the major requirements; 

3. In distributing other Core Curriculum requirements, consideration 
will be given to enriching the student's liberal education and 
complementing Core equivalencies completed as part of the Associate 
Degree. In this case, determination of appropriate Core courses will 
be done by the Registrar in consultation with the Division Chair. 

Courses which apply to the student's major will be evaluated by the College 
Misericordia Registrar on a course by course comparison with College 
Misericordia courses and are subject to approval by the Registrar in 
consultation with appropriate Division Chairs. 



"0 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Admission Requirements 



The Upon receipt of the Application for Admission, the secondary school 

Admissions record/transcript, post-secondary transcripts (if applicable), and the 

Process guidance or transfer counselor recommendation, the Committee on 

Admissions reviews the applicant's portfolio and notifies a candidate by 
mail of the admission decision usually within three or four weeks. 

Because of the limited number of students admitted each year to most 
programs of study, reservation deposits will be accepted only while space 
is available. Normally, reservation deposits should be made within six 
weeks of notification of acceptance. Deadline extensions may be granted 
only with the written consent of the Dean of Admissions. 

Incoming students who wish to enroll at College Misericordia for either 
the fall or spring term must submit a reservation deposit of $100 if they 
want to reside on campus. A $50 reservation deposit is required for full- 
time incoming students who plan to commute. This deposit will not be 
refunded if the student withdraws. 



Early Students for whom College Misericordia is the only choice for admission 

Decision may apply for early decision. These applicants must have exhibited 

exceptional academic achievement through the junior year in high school. 

Applications must be submitted after May 15 of the junior year and 

before September 1 of the senior year. 

Admission to College Misericordia does not commit the student to 
attending, but affords the early decision applicant the opportunity to 
know his or her admission status early in the fall of senior year. Early 
decision candidates must also adhere to the reservation deposit deadline. 



Early Students who have completed their junior year in high school with an 

Admission outstanding record of achievement may apply for early admission to 

College Misericordia. Candidates for early admission must meet the 
requirements for the program as set forth by the Academic Policies 
Committee. The applicant's grade point average and SAT results are 
among the major considerations. 

Admission Students wishing to be accepted to Misericordia on a part-time basis in 

of Part-Time either the Accelerated Degree Program (evening/weekend) or the semester 

Continuing format should first contact Continuing Education for a personal interview. 

Education Curriculum requirements, relevant college policies, the process for 

Students transfer credit evaluation, and financial aid referral will be explained in 

detail at that time. 

Although part-time students may begin their studies on a non- 
matriculating basis, they are expected to apply for formal admission to 
the college at the earliest possible date. (Non-matriculated students are 
limited to earning fifteen (15) credits at the college unless special 
arrangements have been approved). Students applying for part-time 
admission to the college must: 



171 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Admission Requirements 



1. Complete a part-time student application form. Submit a non- 
refundable $15 fee with the form. 

2. Send two official transcripts from each college previously attended 
to the Continuing Education Department. 

3. Send two copies of their secondary school (high school) transcript 
to the Continuing Education Department. 

4. Registered nurses must send transcripts from their diploma- 
granting institution, as well as two copies of their RN license to 
the Continuing Education Department. 

Upon receipt of the necessary transcripts and application, the Committee 
on Admissions will meet and notify the candidate of its decision by mail 
within three to four weeks. Students should be aware that certain 
programs (Nursing, Education, Occupational Therapy, Radiography) have 
specific requirements for acceptance into the program. (Refer to the 
individual curriculum guides in the front of this catalog). 



Admission to A candidate who wishes to be admitted to the Pre-Education program 

the Education (freshman year) must meet all of the general admission requirements of 

Program the College. Admission to the Pre-Education Program does not guarantee 

advancement into the Teacher Education Program. Advancement criteria 
for the Professional Program (Sophomore, Junior and Senior years) is 
outlined in the Education Program description of this catalog. 

College Misericordia welcomes applications from qualified transfers to the 
Teacher Education Program. To qualify a student must demonstrate a 
minimum 2.5 GPA in all college work attempted. An evaluation of 
transfer credits will determine program level. All transfers are required to 
meet with an Education Program Advisor prior to registration. 

Interested studejits should refer to the Selection and Retention criteria 
listed in the Education Program description. 



Admission to Students who wish to be considered for Pre-Nursing must submit the 

the Nursing results of their SAT or ACT tests to College Misericordia, and must have 

Program completed at least one year of chemistry, biology, and mathematics, 

including one semester of algebra in high school, achieving at least a 
grade of "C" in each course. Factors to be weighed in determining 
acceptance into the Pre-Nursing program include: 

1. SAT or ACT test scores. 

2. High school science and mathematics grades. 

3. High school class rank. 

Admission to the Pre-Nursing program does not guarantee advancement 
to the Nursing major. Advancement criteria for the Professional Nursing 
Program (Sophomore, Junior and Senior years) is outlined in the Nursing 
program description of this catalog. 



172 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Admission Requirements 



College Misericordia welcomes qualified transfers to the Nursing 
Program. Transfers are required to have a personal interview with the 
chair of the Division of Nursing and must demonstrate a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 2.5 in all college work attempted. 

All interested students should refer to the section on Selection, 
Advancement and Graduation listed in the Nursing Program description. 

Admission Students admitted to the Pre-Occupational Therapy program (first year 

t0 the of study) must meet the general admission requirements of College 

Occupational Misericordia. Applicants should demonstrate a solid background in high 

Therapy school mathematics and science including at least one year of biology and 

Program one y ear °f chemistry with grades of "C" or better. Although not 

required, students are urged to meet with the Occupational Therapy 
program faculty to discuss the major in detail. Admission to the Pre- 
Occupational Therapy program does not guarantee advancement into the 
professional program in Occupational Therapy. 

Transfers may apply for Pre-Occupational Therapy status with the 
understanding that a four-year sequence is required to complete the 
program. Transfers must demonstrate a minimum 2.5 GPA in all college 
work attempted. Transfers must meet with the Occupational Therapy 
program director to discuss career options in the field. 

All interested students should refer to the selection and retention criteria 
listed in the Occupational Therapy Program description. 

Admission A candidate who wishes to be considered for the Pre-Radiography 

to the program (first year of study) must meet the College's general admissions 

Radiography requirements. In addition, students applying for Admission should also 

Program have at least three years of high school mathematics, one year of biology, 

and one year of physics, achieving a minimum grade of "C" in each 
course. Chemistry is strongly recommended but not required. Interviews 
should also be arranged with the program director and the Committee on 
Admissions. Admission into the Pre-Radiography program as a freshman 
does not guarantee advancement into the clinical setting. Advanced 
placement directly into the clinical setting (sophomore level) will be 
considered providing clinical space is available, the student has a 
minimum GPA of 2.5, and has earned a minimum of 24 credits. 

College Misericordia welcomes transfers into the Radiography program, 
providing clinical space is available and the student has a minimum 
G.P.A. of 2.5, and has earned a minimum of 24 credits. 

All interested students should refer to the selection and retention criteria 
listed in the Radiography Program description. 

Advanced Students who have followed the College Entrance Examination Board 

Placement college-level program in secondary school, and have scored 3 or higher 

on selected Advanced Placement examinations, may be granted academic 
credit at College Misericordia. Decisions concerning Advanced 
Placement credits are made by the Registrar and the Division Chair. 



173 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Admission Requirements 



College Le\el Matriculating students may earn up to thirty (30) credits in any degree program 

Examination through CLEP. All thirty (30) credits may be earned through CLEP subject 

Pro a iCLFP} examinations, or fifteen (15) of the thirty may be earned by taking CLEP 

general examinations. A minimum score of 50 is required in any subject 
examinations, and a minimum score of 500 in the general examinations is 
required to obtain credit. 

Subject examinations may be taken only in those subjects which correspond to 
courses described in the catalog or which are part of the cooperative program 
with King's College, Wilkes-Barre. Contact the Continuing Education Office for 
more information. 

Institutional All students admitted to the College are required to take a series of tests in 

Testing math and English before they may register for classes. New full-time freshmen 

Requirements or full-time freshmen transferring fewer than fifteen (15) credits who 

demonstrate a deficiency will be required to enroll in special courses in the area 

corresponding to the deficiency. 

Students demonstrating a deficiency in mathematics must enroll in MTH 090 and 
a math lab two days per week. Students demonstrating deficiencies in writing 
will be enrolled in special sections of ENG 103. 

Students transferring fifteen credits or more will be advised to correct any skills 
deficiency demonstrated through coursework or tutoring. Handicapped students 
must participate in the freshman testing project. Students must attain acceptable 
skills levels by the end of their second semester. 

The freshman testing project also includes advanced placement testing in writing 
and mathematics. All incoming freshmen also take the Meyers-Briggs Personality 
Indicator. 

Some majors require program-specific testing at various levels. Frequently the 
results of these tests determine a student's eligibility to continue within the 
program. 

All seniors participate in a final year testing project. The testing measures their 
achievement in several general education areas. The results do not determine 
graduation, but can be used by the College to make course modifications. Seniors 
in selected majors must take general education and major program area tests 
before they graduate. The senior testing is important for students who wish to 
continue their education. Additionally, the senior major program testing qualifies 
students in a variety of majors for outside agency certifications and licenses. 

Re-Admission Students who have previously attended College Misericordia and have withdrawn 

for personal reasons may be considered candidates for re-admission. It is not 
necessary for the student to reapply, but a letter should be sent to the Dean of 
Admissions indicating the reason(s) why the student withdrew and wishes to 
return to the College. In the case of disciplinary dismissal, the matter will be 
referred to the Dean of Students. Students who have been dismissed for 
academic reasons must petition the Academic Dean for readmission. 
Academically dismissed students may not be readmitted for one year after their 
dismissal and until they have raised their GPA to 2.0 by taking classes at the 
College on a non-matriculating part-time basis. Readmission of an academically- 
dismissed student does not necessarily imply re-admission to a major program. 
The student will be admitted for one semester, pending an evaluation of the 
semester's work by the Academic Status Committee. If at the end of the semester 
the student fails to maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and or fulfill 
other conditions of readmission, he or she will be dismissed permanently. (See 
individual majors for additional requirements.) 



74 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Academic 
Advising 



Each student is assigned an academic advisor within the student's major 
department. Students undecided about their major will be assigned special 
advisors. 

Academic advisors are the students' liaison with other college offices. 
Advisors should be consulted often for guidance and advice. In addition 
to lending academic guidance, advisors can provide information on where 
to obtain and how to complete necessary forms pertaining to academics. 

Advisors must sign all academic paperwork including course registration, 
drop/add forms, withdrawal from course forms, off-campus permission 
forms, etc. Advisors meet with students individually for pre-registration 
consultation each semester. 

Faculty members post their office hours to assist students in making 
appointments. Academic advisement is coordinated through the office of 
the Assistant to the Academic Dean. 



Academic 
Grievance 
Procedure 



The College provides a uniform method by which students can pursue 
grievable issues. Grievable issues are complaints about the institution's 
academic policies or lack of them, its prescribed procedures for carrying 
out its policies, its administration of matters related to instructional 
practices, or any combination of the above. 



NOTE: Formal grievances must be filed while the student is 
matriculating, or within one year following the student's date of 
graduation. 

A student who has a grievance should attempt to resolve it on an informal 
basis by using the following procedures: 

1. The student should first speak to the person with whom the 
complaint rests. 

2. If the matter is not satisfactorily resolved at that level, the 
student should proceed to the chair of the division to discuss 
the issue. 



Formal 

Grievance 

Procedure 



3. If the matter is not resolved at that level, the student should 

proceed to the office of the Academic Dean where a formal 
grievance may be filed. 

The student shall inform the Academic Dean in writing of his or her 
intent to seek formal redress through the grievance procedure, indicating 
the nature of the complaint. • 

Within fourteen (14) calendar days of receipt of the written complaint, 
the Academic Dean will convene the Academic Grievance Committee and 
provide the chair of the committee with the student's statement of the 
complaint. 

The Academic Grievance Committee is composed of one administrator and 
one faculty member appointed by the Academic Dean, and the academic 
affairs coordinator of Student Government. 



75 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



At least two (2) days in advance of the hearing, the chair of the 
committee will notify the student and the individual charged with the 
complaint of: 

1. The time and place of the hearing. 

2. Specification and nature of the complaint. 

3. The composition of the committee. 

4. The right of the individual charged to be present when charges 
and evidence are presented to the committee, to question and to 
give evidence on his or her behalf. 

At any hearing, committee members may question witnesses to evaluate 
all the relevant facts of a given case. All committee meetings shall be 
private; witnesses shall be excluded except for the period of their 
questioning. 

The report and recommendation of the committee shall be in writing, 
including the committee's rationale for the decision and including any 
dissenting opinion. Only those committee members who have heard all 
testimony and evidence in a given case may vote on the committee's 
recommendation. 

The committee's report and recommendations shall be forwarded to the 
Academic Dean within ten (10) calendar days of the hearing. 

The Academic Dean will make the final determination and formally 
advise the parties involved. 



Academic 
Honors 



The Dean's List is issued at the close of each semester in recognition of 
students who have completed a minimum of 12 graded credit hours and 
have earned a grade point average of 3.55 (on a 4.0 system) for the 
semester. 



Degrees with 
Distinction 



Students are awarded degrees with distinction for exceptional academic 
achievement. Honors are awarded as follows: 



Distinction 



Grade Point Average at Graduation 



Summa Cum Laude 
Magna Cum Laude 
Cum Laude 



3.80 and above 
3.60 - 3.79 
3.40 - 3.59 



Honors 
Degree 



College 
Honors 



A student must have completed at least 60 credits at College Misericordia 
to qualify for these honors. Commencement honors for the highest 
scholastic average can be earned only by a student who has matriculated 
at the college for four full years. 

Students who complete the College Honors curriculum and the Honors 
Research Project, while achieving a Grade Point Average of 3.4 or better, 
will be awarded an Honors Degree. 

Students who complete the Honors curriculum with both an Honors Degree 
and overall Grade Point Average of at least 3.0 will graduate with College 
Honors. 



176 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Academic All students must maintain an acceptable cumulative grade point average to 

Standing remain in good academic standing. Failure to do so will result in either 

academic probation or academic dismissal. In addition, students are 
advised to confer with their divisional advisors, for some divisions require 
specific averages in certain majors. 

All transfer students are expected to have a 2.0 grade point average to be 
admitted to the College. 

Probation Academic probation is the automatic and minimum penalty for failing to 

maintain an acceptable cumulative grade point average. Students failing to 
maintain an acceptable grade point average are also liable to suspension or 
dismissal from the college. Students who have attempted between 12 and 
23 credits will be placed on probation if their cumulative grade point 
average is below 1.75. Those who have attempted between 24 and 37 
credits will be placed on probation if their cumulative grade point 
average is below 1.90; and students who have attempted 38 or more 
credits will be placed on probation if their cumulative grade point 
average is below 2.0. 

Transfer students whose cumulative grade point average at College 
Misericordia falls below 2.0 after attempting 15 credits will be placed on 
probation. If a transfer student's grade point average at College 
Misericordia falls below 2.0 after attempting 30 credits, the student will 
be dismissed. 

Students will also be placed on academic probation for failure to maintain 
an acceptable cumulative grade point average in courses taken to fulfill 
the core curriculum requirements. Students who have attempted 30 credits 
or above will be placed on academic probation if their cumulative grade 
point average for core requirements is below 1.75. Students must have a 
cumulative grade point average of 2.0 for the 54-credit college core in 
order to graduate. 

A student on academic probation is prohibited from representing the 
College in any official capacity. This prohibition includes, but is not 
limited to, holding any elected or appointed office or seat in Student 
Government or on the Executive Board of Student Government, serving 
as a Resident Advisor, or participating in inter-collegiate athletics. 

Students on academic probation are under the immediate supervision of 
the Academic Dean and may be required to carry a restricted load of 
work. Furthermore, they may have their participation in non-prohibited 
extra-curricular activities curtailed if in the judgement of the Academic 
Dean such activities could interfere with their academic performance. 

Academic Probation will begin with the first class meeting of the 
Semester (Fall, Spring or Summer) following the announcement of 
probation. 

A student on Academic Probation for two semesters is subject to suspension 
or dismissal from the College. 



177 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Dismissal 



A student whose work or conduct is deemed unsatisfactory is subject to 
dismissal from the college. Failure to make satisfactory academic progress 
(as outlined under probation), failure to fulfill the terms of academic 
probation, remaining on academic probation for two consecutive semesters, 
or a serious breach of academic ethics will result in academic dismissal. 



A cumulative index of lower than 1.0 at the end of the freshman year will 
bring academic dismissal. 

Once academically dismissed, a student may not matriculate at the College 
for one full year. Then, a student will be re-admitted only if his or her grade 
point average has risen to 2.0. A student's grade point average may be 
improved by attending classes on a non-matriculating, part-time basis. To 
do this a student must file a contract with the Assistant to the Academic 
Dean outlining the strategies to be used to return to good academic status. 
Students who were enrolled full-time when they were dismissed will be 
given one calendar year to gain the required 2.0 cumulative grade point 
average. Part-time students who were dismissed will be given two calendar 
years. 

The Academic Status Committee will monitor the student's progress and 
fulfillment of the terms of the contract each semester. If sufficient progress 
is not being made, or the terms of the contract are not being observed, the 
privilege of attending classes on a part-time, non-matriculating basis will 
be withdrawn and the student is permanently dismissed. 

Re-admitted students enter under the academic program requirements and 
regulations in force at the time of their readmission. Re-admission to the 
College does not necessarily imply re-admission to a major program. After 
being re-admitted, the student must maintain a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 or he/she will be permanently dismissed and will not be 
permitted to attend classes on a non-matriculating basis. 



Cancellation 
of Classes 



The following information concerns cancellation of classes. For delayed 
start of the school day refer to Compressed Schedule. 



Day Classes 



If classes are to be cancelled, or the College is to be closed because of 
weather or other special conditions, the decision will be made by 6:00 a.m. 
and relayed promptly to local radio stations. 



Evening Classes 



Weekend Classes 



Individual 

Cancellations 



Announcement regarding the cancellation of evening classes will be made 
by 4:00 p.m. and will be reported to local radio stations. 

The cancellation of Weekend College classes will be made on a day-to-day 
basis, and will be reported to local radio stations after 4.00 p.m. for Friday 
evening classes, and after 6:00 a.m. for Saturday and Sunday classes. 

Individual class cancellations are posted by the Academic Dean as they are 
reported; however, if a professor must cancel a class on her his own volition 
due to an emergency situation, it is that instructor's responsibility to see 
that the students in that class are properly notified. Instructors will make 
provisions for this eventuality with their classes at the beginning of each 
semester. 



78 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Validation The RN student is eligible to take Validation Examinations by appointment. 

Examinations Interested students should contact the Director of the RN program for 

details. 

Change of Students who wish to change from one academic discipline to another will 

Academic Major consult with their assigned academic advisor. Division approval must be 

secured by appropriate Division Chairs. 

Change of major forms may be obtained in the office of the Academic Dean. 
The change of major does not take place until the appropriate form is 
properly executed and filed with the Registrar. 

Change of Notice of a change of name or address must be given in writing to the office 

Name/ Address of the Registrar. It will then be appropriately processed throughout the 

College. 

Change of Students who wish to change from full-time to part-time status are 

Status requested to inform the Academic Dean. Students are then referred to the 

Continuing Education Office for registration information. 

Students who want to change from part-time to full-time status must 
address a letter to the Dean of Admissions, stating their intentions. The Dean 
will notify them in writing concerning their status. 

Class College Misericordia affirms the importance of classroom attendance, and 

Attendance recognizes the value of faculty/student and student student interaction. 

Policy Students are expected to attend all classes. 

Students are allowed the following unexcused absences from class: 3 for a 
50-minute class; 2 for a 75-minute class; 1 for a 140-minute class; 1 for 
a 150-minute class; 1 for a 240-minute class. 

The College recognizes that there are circumstances when a student must 
miss class and these necessary absences should not incur academic penalty. 
Such instances include: direct participation in College-sponsored events, 
illness, death in the family, and other emergencies. It is the responsibility 
of the student to consult with the faculty member, event sponsor, the 
Division Chair, and/or the Academic Dean (as is appropriate) to secure an 
excused absence and to arrange for any makeup work. 

No unexcused absences are allowed for fieldwork, clinical placements, 
seminar courses, student teaching, cooperative education classes, and other 
specialized classes where student/faculty or student/student interaction is. 
in effect, the substance of the class. (Seminar courses are identified as such 
in the course title. Specialized classes are published annually by the Office 
of the Academic Dean.) 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



79 



Classification 
of Students 



Students are classified as follows: 

Freshmen - those who have earned between 0-29 credits. 
Sophomores - those who have earned between 30-59 credits. 
Juniors - those who have earned between 60-89 credits. 
Seniors- those who have earned 90 credits or above. 



Compressed 
Schedule 



Special Students - those who have earned a baccalaureate degree and are 
pursuing a second degree. 

Full-Time Students - students carrying a minimum of twelve credits. 

Part-Time Students - students carrying fewer than twelve credits in a 
semester format. Accelerated degree students frequently carry twelve 
credits over two "terms," but are still considered part-time . 

Matriculating Students - students seeking a degree who have been formally 
accepted into the College. 

Non-Matriculating Students - students who are not following a sequence 
of courses leading to a degree or students who have not been formally 
accepted. 

Certificate Students - students following a sequence of courses leading to 
an educational certificate 

When it is necessary to delay the start of the school day (due to snow, heating 
problems, etc.) but not necessary to cancel the full day of classes, a 
"Compressed Class Schedule" will be put into effect. The schedule is as 
follows: 

Monday/Wednesday/ Friday Classes 
Regular Time (50 Min.) Compressed Time (40 Min.) 



8:00-8:50 


9:00-9:50 


10:00-10:50 


11:00-11:50 


12:00-12:50 


1:00-1 


50 


2:00-2 


50 


3:00-3 


50 


4:00-4 


50 



10:00-10 

10:50-11 

11:40-12 

12:30-1:10 

1:20-2:00 

2:10-2:50 

3:00-3:40 

3:50-4:30 

4:40-5:20 



40 
30 
20 



Tuesday/Thursday Classes 
Regular Classes (75 Min.) Compressed Time (60 Min.) 



8:00-9:15 

9:30-10:45 

11:00-12:15 

12:30-1:45 

2:00-3:15 

3:30-4:45 



10 
11 
12 



00-11:00 
10-12:10 
20-1:20 
30-2:30 
40-3:40 
50-4:50 



180 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Credit Load College Misericordia degrees require a minimum of 120 credits, although 

most programs require an average of 126 credits and are designed to be 
completed in eight semesters. Students enrolled in programs with degree 
requirements in excess of 126 credits should expect to spend longer than 
eight semesters to earn their degree. 18 credits constitute a maximum 
semester load. Students who wish to take more than 18 credits in one 
semester must have a minimum GPA of 2.75 and receive written permission 
from the Academic Dean prior to registration. Students must also pay an 
additional per-credit charge for every credit taken over 18. (See tuition and 
fees). No student may take more than 21 credits a semester. 

Students on academic probation may also have their course loads restricted. 

Contract Contract Learning is the term used to define any college-sponsored 

Learning accredited course that is conducted outside a traditional classroom setting 

(other than a cooperative education arrangement). Two types of contract 
learning are available at College Misericordia: (1) directed study; (2) 
independent study. 

Directed Study When a full time student must take a specific college course in a given 

semester but it is not part of the offerings in that semester, the student may 
petition for a directed study. 

Continuing Education students who encounter serious personal 
complications that preclude attendance at a regularly scheduled class may 
explore the option of taking a directed study by first discussing their 
situation with Continuing Education administrators or their advisors. 
Courses that are offered in the current semester's roster, as well as those 
that are not available that particular semester, are eligible under this policy. 

Students may apply for directed study only in exceptional situations. 
Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 to request directed study. 

Full time students interested in this option should: first discuss this 
possibility with their advisor; next talk with the appropriate chairperson 
of the division for the course under consideration. If the contract is 
approved by the division chairperson, the chair will approach the 
appropriate faculty member to determine his/her availability. (Faculty 
members retain the right to decline a requested directed study). Final 
approval of this arrangement is made by the Academic Dean. 

Part-time students are to follow the same procedures for arranging a 
directed study as outlined for full time students i.e., first, discuss their 
request with their advisor; second, contact the chairperson of the division 
which sponsors the desired course. If the contract is approved by that chair. 
the chair will then approach the appropriate faculty member to determine 
his/her availability. (Again, the faculty member may choose not to teach 
a directed study; it is completely at his/her discretion/convenience). Final 
approval of this contract learning arrangement rests with the Academic 
Dean. 



181 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Recognizing that many non-traditional part-time students may have 
difficult) contacting the designated individuals. Continuing Education v. ill 
assist, if necessary, in coordination of relevant details on behalf of the 
student. 

A written contract will be drafted between the instructor and the student 
which will clarify course objectives, methodology, and means of evaluation. 
The minimum number of times that a student and instructor are to meet 
will be included in this document. Copies of the contract are to be forwarded 
to the Academic Dean, the student's advisor, the instructor, the registrar, 
and if the student is part-time, to the Continuing Education Department. 
The student must register prior to the beginning of a semester for a contract 
learning directed study. Ideally the contract should be drafted during the 
previous semester. Students will be expected to assume much of the 
responsibility for actually writing the contract. Forms are available in the 
Registrar's Office. 

Independent Independent study is the special investigation of a selected topic. It may 

Studv be undertaken by an advanced student whose academic requirements cannot 

be met by regular catalogue offerings. Independent study may not be taken 
simply to accrue existing course credits. Only free elective credits may be 
used for independent study. Depending on the depth and scope of an 
independent study, from one (1) to six (6) credits may be earned. 
(Determination of assigned credits is made by the appropriate division 
chairperson and faculty member). 

Students who wish to apply for an independent study must have a least a 

3.0 GPA. The student must have demonstrated the ability to pursue 
independent work. To apply for independent study students must (a) define 
the topic or issue to be pursued; (b) discuss their plan with their advisor; 
(c) contact the chairperson of the appropriate division to request approval 
of their proposal; (d) if the independent studs is approved, the chair will 
approach a faculty member in his/her division to serve as a mentor. (Faculty 
are free to choose whether or not to mentor a student for independent 
study). 

Part of the intent of an independent study is to foster self-directed learning. 
Therefore, after a student has specified the content area to be studied and 
has diagnosed his/her learning needs, the faculty-mentor and student will 
jointly negotiate course objectives; learning resources and methodology; 
and procedures for evaluation. The minimum number of meeting times will 
also be specified. A written contract is to be drafted and signed by both 
parties which includes these areas. Copies are to be forwarded to the 
Academic Dean, the student's advisor, the mentor, the registrar, and if a 
student is part-time, to the Continuing Education Department. 

Independent work is not governed by the academic calendar. A project ma\ 
be started and ended at any point during the semester. Students should 
register for an independent study when their work is initiated; if the 
project/research extends beyond the end of a given semester, an 
"Incomplete" (I) can be issued. 

Independent study application forms may be obtained from the Registrar. 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



General 
Guidelines 



Students must be MATRICULATED students at the College in order to 
register for Contract Learning. A student can earn no more than 15 credits 
via the Contract Learning Option. A maximum of six (6) credits per 
semester can be carried. 



Drop/Add 
Policy 



Foreign 
Students 



Contract Learning (i.e., either Independent Study or Directed Study) will 
be delivered to the student at no additional cost above the regular tuition 
fees. 

Students should consult the academic calendar for the dates of the drop/ 
add period, during which time schedule changes may be made with the 
Registrar. Drop/add forms are available in the Registrar's Office. The drop/ 
add form must be approved and signed by the student's advisor before it 
may be processed. A $5.00 fee is charged for each drop/add form processed. 
Drop/add is not official unless the form is received and processed by the 
registrar during the drop/add period. 

College Misericordia welcomes students from all nations, but students for 
whom English is not their first language must demonstrate proficiency. 

College Misericordia's Admissions Office can help students register for the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) which measures listening 
and reading comprehension as well as written expression. 



Because College Misericordia does not offer English as a Second Language 
(ESL) programs, it is essential that the student demonstrate a mastery of 
the language sufficient to perform college-level work. 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Grading The grade point average is computed by dividing honor points earned by 

System credits attempted. Any courses failed will be charged as credits attempted 

through to the final calculation of a student's grade point average. A 
minimum of a (2.0) cumulative grade point average is required to graduate 
both overall and in the 54-credit core curriculum. 

Some majors require a higher cumulative grade point average for graduation 
and program retention. Students should consult individual academic 
program descriptions for major requirements. 

Grades Numerical Values Honor Points Per Credit Hour 

A 

B+ 
B 

C+ 

c 

D 
F 

WP 
*WF 

AU 
W 

IP 
S 

u 
**I 

*Equivalent to a failure; computed as an F. 

**It is the responsibility of the student to contract in writing with the 
instructor for a grade of "Incomplete". The incomplete must be removed 
within six weeks after the end of the semester or it becomes an F. There 
is a $5.00 fee charge for each incomplete grade requested. 



Graduation To obtain a Baccalaureate Degree a student must complete the minimum 

Requirements hours of credit specified by their declared major which must include all 

specific program requirements. Students should consult individual program 

descriptions. 

A student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C) 
or better in all major AND core course requirements to graduate. Some 
majors require a higher cumulative grade point average for graduation. 
Students should consult specific program descriptions. 

A "degree application" form, available from the Registrar's Office, must 
be completed in the year of graduation by the student and advisor. This 
form is to be submitted to the Registrar's office during Spring semester 
registration. All bills must be paid in advance in order for a student to be 
eligible to graduate. 



94-100 






4 


89-93 






3.5 


84-88 






3 


79-83 






2.5 


74-78 






2 


70-73 






1 


below 70 









withdraw pass 


ing 


Not Calculated 


withdraw failing 





audit 






Not Calculated 


withdrawn 






Not Calculated 


in progress 






Not Calculated 


satisfactory 


(pass) 


Not Calculated 


unsatisfacto 


ry 


(fail) 


Not Calculated 


incomplete 










84 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Handicapped 
Students 



Handicapped students (learning disabled, physically impaired, or sensory 
impaired) may receive special support services. Information about the 
Alternative Learners Project is available upon request. All students enrolled 
in the Alternative Learners Project attend regular classes but they are 
supported by an assortment of services delivered by specially trained full- 
time staff. The services include the use of accommodation strategies 
whenever possible. Participation in this program may require an additional 
annual fee. Handicapped students should refer to the Institutional Testing 
Requirements in the Admission Section and to the Alternative Learners 
Project in the Special Programs Section. Handicapped students may require 
extra time to complete their degrees. 



Leave of 
Absence 



Students in good standing may request a leave of absence from the College 
for up to one semester by filing a letter with the Academic Dean stating 
their reason for requesting the leave and their anticipated date of return. 
In extraordinary circumstances the Academic Dean may grant a one 
semester extension to a leave upon written request from the student. 



Students on leave may register for courses for the semester in which they 
are to return and may resume their studies on schedule without reapplying 
for admission or formally notifying the College. 

Students on leave who do not return on schedule are automatically 
withdrawn from the College and must notify the Dean of Admissions in 
the event they wish to return at a later date. (See Re-Admission). 



Off-Campus Course Approvals 
First time 
College Enrollees 

Transfer 
Students 



Students may complete a maximum of 12 credits in approved off-campus 
courses, of which no more than 6 credits may be in college core courses. 

Students with a two year AA/AS degree may complete a maximum of 6 
credits in approved off-campus courses. 



Students without an AA/AS degree may complete a maximum of 6 credits 
in approved off-campus courses, of which no more than 3 credits may be 
in college core courses. 



General 
Policy 



Junior and senior status students must complete all off-campus 
course work at accredited four year institutions. 



B. All off-campus course work for courses above the 200 level at 

College Misericordia must be completed at accredited four year 
institutions. 



C. All off-campus courses must be evaluated and approved as to their 

equivalency to College Misericordia courses. This determination 
will be made by the College Misericordia Registrar, in consultation 
with appropriate Division Chairs. 

Off campus course approval forms are available in the office of the 
Registrar. 



185 



COLLEGE REGl'LAIIONS 



Pass/Fail 
Courses 



Pass/Fail grading is limited to those courses designated in the college catalog 
to be on a pass/fail basis. The letter grade of S (satisfactory) or U 
(unsatisfactory) will be assigned to these courses. S and U grades are listed 
on the transcript but are not calculated in the grade point average. Credits 
for these courses are not included in the 12 graded credit hours required 
for the Dean's List. 



A student must maintain at least a 70% level of performance to receive an 
"S" (passing) grade. 



Registration 

Full -Time and 
Matriculating 
Part-Time 
Students 



At the time of early registration, class registration forms must be completed 
by the students and signed by their advisors prior to their scheduled time 
to register. The registration process is handled by the Registrar's Office. 

Students who wish to take more than 18 credits in one semester must seek 
permission from the Academic Dean prior to registration. This privilege is 
limited to students who have a GPA of 2.75 or better. Students must pay 
an additional per credit charge for every credit taken over 18 (see Tuition 
and Fees). No student may take over 21 credits a semester. 



Repeating Courses 
Mandatory 

Optional 



A currently enrolled and matriculated student who receives a grade of "F" 
in a required course must repeat that course and earn a passing grade. 

If a grade of "F" is received in a free elective, that course does not have 
to be repeated, but a student may elect to repeat any course in which he/ 
she has received a grade of "D" or "F". All repeated courses must be taken 
at College Misericordia in order to improve the student's GPA. 



GPA 

Calculation 
Repeated 
Courses 



The repeated course will appear on the transcript twice. The original grade 
will be replaced with an "R" and only the new grade will be used in 
calculating the student's GPA, subject to the following conditions: 

1. The student must indicate his/her intention of replacing the old 

grade with the new one by filing the appropriate form with the 
Registrar at registration. 



2. This grade calculation replacement privilege is limited to a 
maximum of five repeated courses for which the proper forms have 
been filed with the Registrar. 

3. Only the new grade, even if it is lower than the original, will be 
used in calculating the GPA. 

4. For any course repeated beyond the maximum of five, or any 
repeated courses for which the proper forms have not been filed 
with the Registrar, both the original and repeated grades will be 
used in GPA calculations. 



Once a student has graduated, that student's record prior to graduation is 
not subject to change through this pol 



186 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Second Students who wish to obtain a second baccalaureate degree may do so if 

Degree they fulfill the following conditions: 

1. The student must be officially admitted into the major program in 
which the second degree is desired by the Division offering that 
major. 

2. The student must meet all of the curriculum requirements of the 
second degree for both major and required courses, successfully 
completing those required courses which cannot be equated with 
courses taken in the first degree program. 

3. The student must complete a minimum of thirty credit hours in 
addition to the credits taken in the first degree program. 

4. For purposes of a second degree, the liberal arts core is waived with 
the exception of those courses required for the major. 

Withdrawal A student who wishes to withdraw from the College must inform the Office 

From the College of the Academic Dean in writing. The date the office receives written 

notification will determine final grades for courses and if any refund of 

tuition is warranted (see Refund Policy). 

Withdrawal A student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty within 

From a Course the period stated in the college calendar. Withdrawal forms may be obtained 

from the Registrar's Office. A grade of W is given for an approved 
withdrawal. The date on which the form is received by the Registrar's 
Office is considered as the date of withdrawal and the refund of the tuition 
and grade assigned are based on this date (see Refund Policy). If a student 
does not officially withdraw from a course and ceases to attend it, a grade 
of "F" is incurred. If a student withdraws while failing, after the date for 
withdrawal without academic penalty, a grade of WF is incurred. 



87 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 
Special Programs 



Accelerated The Accelerated Degree Program is a special model for part-time 

Degree adult learners who must balance family and career responsibilities 

Program while pursuing their education. 

Classes meet in "Terms" which consist of 15 Monday and 
Thursday evenings (5:40 p.m. -8:00 p.m. and/or 8:10 p.m.- 10:30 
p.m.). Six terms per year are offered. Students may take up to 
two classes per term which allows them to obtain a bachelor's 
degree in approximately four years. 

For further information on the program and the degrees offered 
contact the Continuing Education Office at (717) 675-2181, ext. 
289. 

Act 101 Funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the Act 101 

Program Program assists qualified state residents in developing the 

attitudes, skills and abilities necessary for them to improve the 

quality of their learning. 

The Act 101 Program is comprehensive in nature; it addresses the 
academic, social and emotional needs of its students. Services are 
provided in the areas of peer tutoring, professional tutoring, 
computer assisted learning, peer counseling, professional 
counseling and career exploration. 

A three-credit pre-college summer program facilitates the 
development of academic survival skills. The primary purpose is 
to assist students in making a successful transition from high 
school to college. 

The Act 101 Program operates out of the Student Assistance 
Center which is located in the lower level of Alumnae Hall. 

Alternative Full time students who are learning disabled, sensorially 

Learners impaired, or physically handicapped may receive support services 

Project from the staff of College Misericordia's Alternative Learners 

Project (ALP). These services include a variety of 
accommodative strategies which are designed to work around 
students' disabilities whenever possible. Participation in the 
program may require an additional fee. Information on the 
Alternative Learners Project is available. 

Air Force Through cooperative programs with Wilkes College and the 

and Army University of Scranton, College Misericordia students can take 

ROTC P art m Air Force and Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps. 

The Air Force ROTC program is based at Wilkes; the University 
of Scranton administers the Army ROTC program. Students who 
participate in ROTC at these institutions do so without penalty to 
their full-time academic status at College Misericordia. Free 
elective courses are awarded by the College for ROTC 
participation. Tuition for ROTC courses is paid directly to the 
institutions offering the programs. More information about 
ROTC may be obtained from the Registrar. 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Special Programs 



Center for College Misericordia's Center for Professional Development provides a 

Professional broad array of consultation, evaluation, and training to business and 

Development community organizations. Programs are conducted on campus or they 

can be delivered on site for special groups. 

For further information contact the Center for Professional 
Development at (717) 675-3862. 

Continuing College Misericordia offers a variety of educational options for part- 

Education time students and for those who did not go to college right after high 

school. 

The Continuing Education office is sensitive to the special needs of 
students with families, full-time jobs, or both. Evening classes are held 
every semester and during the summer. Many students find weekend 
classes (see Weekend College) and the accelerated degree program (see 
Accelerated Degree Program) convenient. 

All of the College's academic and student services facilities are open to 
Continuing Education students. Similarly, such students must comply 
with the College regulations which pertain to all students, with one 
exception: incoming part-time students do not have to pay a reservation 
deposit. The Continuing Education Office serves the adult learner in a 
variety of ways including individualized academic counseling; SIGI 
PLUS, a computerized career guidance system to help students 
determine which vocational paths best suit their work values, interests 
and abilities; periodic workshops on topics such as study skills, job 
search and interview techniques; simplified registration procedures; free 
tutoring and a variety of credit options outside of the classroom. 

Credit Options Outside the Classroom 

Misericordia recognizes that significant, meaningful learning often 
occurs in settings other than structured, college-sponsored courses. For 
adult students who would like to receive credit for knowledge they have 
already acquired, CLEP and Prior Learning Assessment permit them to 
translate their learning into college credit. 

CLEP (College Level Exam Program) allows adult students to 
demonstrate their knowledge in a wide range of subject areas. The tests 
reward them for what they know, no matter where or how they learned 
it - on-the-job, through reading, etc. Matriculating students may earn 
up to 30 credits through CLEP. 

Cooperative Education, integrates academic study with work experiences 
in the community. Cooperative Education offers students the 
opportunity to gain real life exposure to a career field. 

Contract Learning provides students the convenience of continuing 
their college studies despite temporary work or family demands that 
prevent them from attending regularly scheduled classes. An 
independent study arrangement, contract learning can be set up for 
either course offerings from our catalogue or for topics that students 
would like to study in more depth. 



89 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 
Special Programs 



Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) Credits 

Students who wish to attempt Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) 
\ulidation will detail their relevant learning in a written document 
called a portfolio. The portfolio information is to be organized so 
as to correspond as closely as possible to comparable courses from 
Misericordia's inventory of undergraduate offerings. Emphasis will 
be placed on the satisfactory presentation of the student's 
knowledge relative to each course's learning objectives. 

For each challenged course, a faculty assessor from each of the 
involved Divisions will be selected by that Division's Chair. The 
assessors will review the portfolio according to the following 
criteria: the learning will be demonstrated to be college level, as 
defined by faculty assessors; the learning is current, particularly in 
quickly changing fields such as computer science and business; the 
learning must be able to be generalized and transferred, i.e., it can 
be applied outside of the specific context or situation in which it 
was acquired; the learning must be somehow measurable; the 
learning must have a theoretical as well as a practical component; 
credits will be awarded for competence and actual learning 
outcomes not merely the experience; the credits awarded will not 
duplicate other earned college credits. This includes transferred 
credits, CLEP credits, Misericordia-awarded credits, validation 
exams for R.N.s in Nursing, etc. The maximum number of credits 
that can be awarded to a student will be thirty (30). 

Students who request assessment of their prior learning must: 

1. be matriculated at the college with a declared major; 

2. attend at least the initial session of a credit-free 
orientation for portfolio development; 

3. limit requests for assessment to those course areas that will 
fulfill degree requirements in their declared major; 

4. have had all transfer credits officially evaluated prior to 
attempting this credit option. 

Students will not be required to have any previously earned 
Misericordia credits; thus there will be no minimum GPA 
requirements. 

Students who have been awarded Prior Learning Assessment 
Credits at another institution will not automatically be awarded 
such credit in transfer. They will, however, have the opportunity 
to present their portfolios, with updated information, to our PLA 
committee. 

Administratis Process 

The option for Prior Learning Assessment will be available only 
during Fall and Spring semesters. Students will attend an initial 
orientation session (free of charge) to familiarize them with the 
college policy and process of PLA. The credit free workshop, 
portfolio requirements, and fee structures will be explained. 



190 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Special Programs 



Fee structures 

$50 Workshop fee; $50 Paid to each Faculty Assessor per course. The 
Student pays these fees regardless of whether or not credit is awarded. 
$75 Posting fee for each 3 credit course awarded. (Per credit posting 
fee: $25.) 

The orientation session and workshop will be offered early in the fall 
and spring semesters. Students are encouraged to complete their 
portfolios within a given semester. If they require a second semester 
to finalize a portfolio, they will be charged another $50 workshop 
fee. (Since there are two terms per semester in the Accelerated 
Program, students in that program will meet semester, not term, 
ending dates for portfolios). Students must complete the portfolio 
within one calendar year. Once this time limit has expired, the student 
cannot pursue this option again, unless the student should interrupt 
his/her education and would have had significant learning experiences 
in the interim that qualify for PLA. 

Students must take a minimum of thirty (30) credits in pursuit of 
their degrees at Misericordia in traditional formats, i.e., structured 
classroom settings. The balance of credit requirements must meet 
existing policies on transfer credits, CLEP credits, contract learning 
credits, RN validation exams, and other relevant policies. 

Students should refer to the relevant sections of the catalog for more 
comprehensive descriptions of these programs. Adult learners should 
also refer to the catalog sections on the Accelerated Degree Program, 
Weekend College, Deferred Payment, Financial Aid, Refund Policies, 
Admission of Transfer Students, and Tutorial Assistance. 

For further information contact the office of the Director of 
Continuing Education at (717) 675-2181 ext. 289. 



Credit-Free 
Programs 



For individuals interested in professional and personal development, 
the Office of Special Programs offers a variety of credit-free 
programs, classes and workshops (see Center for Professional 
Development). 

In addition, the College offers special programs, camps, non-credit 
courses and workshops for children. 

For further information contact the Office of Continuing Education at 
(717) 675-2181, ext. 331. 



Cooperative 
Education 



The Cooperative Education program integrates academic study with 
work experience in the community. Students may earn academic credit 
for full or part-time work assignments related to their educational 
interests. The job assignments are supervised by College faculty. 
Students pay tuition for the credits they earn in field experiences and 
earn salaries which vary with each work assignment. 



19 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Special Programs 



Cooperative Education enables students to explore career 
opportunities and prepares them for entry into the job market. By 
means of Cooperative Education, students experience personal 
growth, develop independent learning skills, and enjoy broad 
based education. 

Minimum GPA restrictions apply; check with your academic 
advisor for clarification. 

Cooperative Students at College Misericordia may register for courses at King's 

Program with College in Wilkes-Barre, if those courses are not part of 

King's College Misericordia's curricula. The program is reciprocal. 

Full-time students in good academic standing who meet specific 
course prerequisites are eligible. Ordinarily, cross registration is 
available only to juniors and seniors who have received permission 
from their major department to participate in the program. Cross 
registered courses are considered part of a student's regular course 
load; no additional tuition fees are charged and courses carry full 
academic credit and grade value. 

Developmental Students who, based upon high school performance and freshmen 

Education testing, require assistance in writing, mathematics or study skills 

are placed into regular entry level courses. However, attached to 
these courses are special support services where students receive 
individualized assistance. Students may also apply for, or be 
recommended to apply for, tutorial assistance in these areas. 
Tutorial assistance is provided free of charge in the Student 
Assistance Center, lower level of Alumnae Hall. 

Foreign Students may earn credit toward a College Misericordia degree 

Study through study at recognized educational institutions abroad. 

Students should consult with their advisors and program directors 
about foreign study, and must obtain permission from the 
Academic Dean. For more information contact the Division of 
Humanities. 

Freshman The Freshman Year Experience has been designed to help students 

Year successfully navigate their first year at College Misericordia. New 

Experience students will work closely with their academic advisors to develop 

an individualized program for success. The academic progress of 
freshmen will be monitored by their academic advisors and the 
Director of the Program. All freshmen will have the opportunity 
to attend workshops in the areas of academic, personal and social 
development. 

A special career development program utilizing interest 
inventories, computer assisted career exploration and decision- 
making skills has been devised for undeclared freshmen. Upon 
completion of this program, undeclared students will have more 
information upon which to base their selection of major. 



92 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Special Programs 



Freshmen who are on academic probation at the end of the fall 
semester will participate in a study skills development program when 
they return to campus in January. 

The Student The Student Assistance Center services students who wish to improve 

Assistance the quality of their learning, examine career options and/or benefit 

Center from counseling about personal difficulties. The Center offers 

comprehensive support services through the following programs: peer 
tutoring, professional tutoring, collaborative learning groups, computer 
assisted tutorials, peer counseling, professional counseling, career 
exploration and selection. Specifically the Center offers assistance in 
academic coursework, study skills, mathematics, writing, and personal 
development. The Center is located in the lower level of Alumnae 
Hall. 

Tutorial College Misericordia offers a variety of tutorial options to assist 

Assistance students in achieving academic goals. Individualized peer tutoring is 

Project provided in regular curriculum courses. In addition, collaborative 

learning groups, led by peer tutors, offer supplementary course 
instruction. Professional staff is available to assist those students who 
wish to improve their study skill abilities. The Tutorial Program 
operates out of the Student Assistance Center which is located in the 
lower level of Alumnae Hall. 

Veterans College Misericordia welcomes the opportunity to provide education to 

veterans of the armed services. College Misericordia is approved by 
the Veterans Administration for the education and training of 
veterans. 

Veterans enrolling at the institution for the first time should notify 
their local Veterans Administration Office in order to apply for 
educational benefits. This application should be filed six weeks prior 
to the beginning of the semester. Students must contact the Registrar's 
Office to initiate the process. 

Weekend The McAuley Weekend College is a special accelerated educational 

College model for adult learners who must balance family and career 

responsibilities while pursuing their education. Students may earn 
credit toward a bachelor's degree by attending classes on weekends. 
The program emphasizes independent, self-motivated study. Weekend 
College classes meet six to seven times a semester on Saturdays or 
Sundays. 

For further information contact the Continuing Education Office at 
(717)675-3862. 



193 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Tuition and Fees 



Tuition The following charges cover one academic semester. Because of the 

and Fees effects of inflation and resultant increasing costs, fees usually rise 

annually. It is anticipated that College costs will continue to increase 
so that the quality of Misericordia's educational programs may be 
maintained. 

All tuition charges, with the exception of financial aid award 
amounts, are to be paid in full at the beginning of each semester 
term unless special arrangements are made with the comptroller. 
Interest is charged on unpaid balances. 

Please note that some academic departments may charge fees or 
require deposits not specified in this listing. Tuition and Fees will 
increase in 1990-1991. 

Expenses Tuition 1989-90 

per Semester 

Full-time students 

Regular tuition S3, 135 

Tuition for majors in medical technology, 

music, nursing, occupational therapy, 

radiography and new freshmen/transfers .... $3,440 

Part-time students 

Regular tuition $ 1 50/credit 

Tuition for majors in medical technology, 

music, nursing, occupational therapy, 

radiography S165/credit 

Full-time students who wish to take more than 18 credits will be 
charged for additional credits at $1 50/credit, (or $165/credit for 
courses in medical technology, music, nursing, occupational therapy 
and radiography). 

Medical technology majors will be charged $200 per semester in lieu 
of tuition during the semesters spent in hospital practicum. Those 
students are also assessed a general fee. 

General Fee 

Full-time students $200 

Part-time students $6/credit 

The general fee includes student center fee, class dues, athletic 
association, student publications, student services and student 
government. 

Room and Board 

Regular campus housing and board plan $1,850 

(Room charge $985; Board charge $865) 

Private Room (double room housing one student) $150 

Single Room (smaller room, designed for one occupant). .$ 75 
College off-campus houses $1200 



194 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Tuition and Fees 



Special Fees, 
Deposits and 



1989-90 

Validation Examinations $ 25/each 

Expenses ^ ee cnar S e d for processing validation examinations which 

fulfill requirements of the nursing core. This fee will be 
charged for each course validated. For courses without a 
clinical practicum this will be the only charge. For Introduction 
to Professional Nursing, this fee will cover the three credits of 
clinical validation; students will be charged the regular tuition 
for the four credit theory component. 

Change of Incomplete Grade Fee $ 5 

Freshman Orientation Fee $ 100 

Liability Insurance $ 14 

(For students enrolled in majors which require 
clinical experience or Field Experiences) 

Parking Fines $ 15 

Parking Permit $ 5 

Private Music Lessons $ 175 

Room reservation deposit (upperclassmen only; room deposit 

is payable by April 15 and is applied to room charges). ... $ 100 

Room damage fee (one time only: refundable) $ 75 

Student I.D $ 1.25 

Student Insurance Fee Variable annually 

Every student must be covered by an insurance plan. The 
College participates in the Blue Cross/Blue Shield Plan; 
Evidence of other plan coverage must be shown. 

Student Teaching Fee $ 200 

For Education major in teaching placements 

Transcript Fee $ 4 



Auditing Students may audit courses at one-half cost based on full or part-time 

credit charges. No credit is awarded for audited courses. Auditors are 
admitted to courses as space is available. Matriculating students who 
wish to audit a course must seek permission from the Registrar. 



195 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Tuition and Fi 



Deferred College Misericordia provides an option for students or parents 

Payment Plan to pay tuition, fees and other charges on a deferred payment 

for Part-Time plan. The plan permits educational costs to be spread over a 

Students period of time. The requirements of the plan are as follows: 

Only part-time students are eligible. 

A down payment of twenty (20) percent of the total term 
semester charges is required. 

Deferments are limited to one term/semester; the unpaid 
balance must be paid before final examinations that term/ 
semester. Failure to pay charges in full before final exams may 
result in loss of credit for the term/semester. 

At the close of each month, the unpaid balance will be charged 
a one (1) percent finance charge. 

Students who fail to meet their deferred payment obligations 
will be dropped from the plan. 

Participants in the plan must sign and receive a copy of the 
deferred payment plan. 

Tuition Full-time students may arrange to pay all or part of their 

Payment Plan college costs in monthly installments. A $45 annual fee is 

for Full-Time charged to cover the processing of payments. Students must be 

Students enrolled in the installment plan prior to the start of the 

academic year. The plan is managed by Academic Management 
Service, Inc., Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Contact the 
Comptroller's office at (717) 675-2181, Ext. 295. 

Interest It is a College policy that any outstanding balances will be 

Wai\ed charged a one (1) percent finance charge at the close of the 

Policy second month into the semester and each month thereafter. 

This policy is waived for the following students: 

Students enrolled in the Academic Management Sen ices 
program (see Tuition Payment Plan for Full-Time Students). 

Students who receive rehabilitation benefits or Veterans' 
Education benefits. 



196 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Financial Assistance 



Financial It is College Misericordia's philosophy that students of ability 

Assistance should have the opportunity to attend the college of their choice 

regardless of family income. For over sixty years, College 
Misericordia has helped students and parents afford a superior 
college education. 

The College participates in a number of financial aid programs. 
These programs generate funds from Federal, State and College 
resources. Additional financial aid monies are contributed by 
alumni and friends of the College. The financial aid office 
packages aid from a combination of sources to meet, as fully as 
possible, the student's indicated need. 

Misericordia is designated as an eligible institution by the 
Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA), 
which allows qualified students to participate in the State Grant 
Program and the Stafford Guaranteed Student Loan Program. 

The College is also designated as an eligible institution by the 
Department of Education, permitting students to take advantage of 
the Federal Pell Grant Program and the Federal campus-based 
programs, including Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, 
Perkins Loans and the Federal Work-Study Program. 

The College also participates in the Nursing Loan Program under 
the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services. 

Three types of financial assistance are available: 

Scholarships/Grants: Gift aid given directly to the student 
based on financial need or some area of achievement, such as 
academic record, athletic ability, etc. The student does not 
repay this type of award. 

Loans: Monies given to students to meet educational expenses, 
but for which students and/or their families assume repayment 
responsibilities, usually after withdrawal or graduation from 
school. Interest is charged on loans; interest charges vary with 
different loan programs. 

Work-Study: Employment which allows students to earn a 
portion of the money needed to meet educational expenses. 
Inquiries regarding all financial aid programs should be directed 
to the financial aid office at 717-675-2181, Ext 313. 

Application All students who wish to be considered for financial assistance must 

Procedures file a College Misericordia Application for Financial Assistance. 

New students should complete and submit the application for financial 
assistance which is attached to the admissions application. Before an 
application may be considered, a student must first be admitted to the 
College. All aid for which a student wishes to be considered should 
be indicated on the application. The application is then returned to 
the admissions office. 



197 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Financial Assistance 



Returning students obtain a College Misericordia Application 
For Financial Assistance form from the financial aid office. 
Before an application may be considered, a student must be 
pre-registered for classes in the academic year for which the 
aid is requested, and other necessary financial aid information 
must be on file in the financial aid office (see Pennsylvania 
and Out-of-State Residents, below). The application is then 
returned to the financial aid office. 

Pennsyhania In addition to the College Misericordia Application for 

and Out-of-State Financial Assistance, all students, regardless of their state of 

Residents legal residence, must submit a Pennsylvania State Grant/ 

Federal Student Aid application. 

Although it is apparent that non-residents of Pennsylvania will 
not receive a Pennsylvania state grant, the College uses the 
information collected on this application to determine 
eligibility for college administered need-based programs, 
including Perkins Loans, Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants, Nursing Loans and Work-Study. Out-of-state students 
should check with their high school or state agency to 
determine eligibility for a grant from the home state. 

Deadlines Pennsylvania State Grant/Federal Student Aid applications and 

the College Misericordia application for Financial Assistance 
must be submitted to the College by: 

March 1 for incoming freshmen and transfer students; April 1 
for returning students. 

Applications and financial aid forms will be accepted later than 
these dates, but no assurances can be made that funds will be 
available for late applicants. For Pell Grants and State Grants, 
students should adhere to the deadlines indicated on the forms 
from those agencies. 

Additional Once all required information is received by the College and 

Requirements the student's enrollment status can be verified according to the 

and Rights application procedures outlined above, the financial aid office 

will determine the student's financial aid in accordance with 
school policy. The student will be notified in writing of the 
results immediately thereafter. 

Financial aid is awarded for one academic year at a time. Aid 
is renewed for subsequent years: 

If the student annually requests assistance by completing all 
appropriate forms described above. 

If the student's financial need continues. Aid will be 
adjusted according to need. 



198 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Financial Assistance 



If the student exhibits satisfactory academic progress toward a 
degree as defined in the Financial Aid Handbook, available 
from the financial aid office. 

Aid from outside sources must be reported to the financial aid 
office. Such outside assistance may alter the amount of aid 
originally awarded by the College. 

Aid will vary according to enrollment status (full or part-time). 
Students must inform the financial aid office of any status 
changes once their aid is packaged. Students may request an 
appointment with the financial aid office to review the 
information which determines their aid for the year, and the 
amount of their financial aid package. 

Students have the right to request that their aid be re-evaluated if 
conditions arise which change their ability to meet the expense of 
their education. 

Sources of financial assistance are described below. More 
information may be obtained from the financial aid office. 

Pell Grant This Federal program provides grants which currently range from 

$225 to $2,300, depending on financial need and educational costs. 
Students who have not yet completed their first undergraduate 
degree may apply. Application is made by completing the 
PHEAA/Federal Student Aid form or CSS Financial Aid Form. 
All students who seek financial aid from College Misericordia 
must apply for this grant. 

Supplemental This Federal program is available to undergraduate students with 

Educational demonstrated financial need. Awards range from $200 to $1,000 

Opportunity yearly depending on need, available funds and other aid received 

Grant by the student. 

Students may receive Supplemental Grants during the period 
required to complete the first undergraduate degree, provided 
satisfactory academic progress is maintained. Students are notified 
of grant awards by a letter from the College. 

PHEAA Grant The PHEAA Grant is a Pennsylvania State scholarship. All 

Pennsylvania resident, full-time students are expected to apply for 
the PHEAA Grant. Awards vary from $100 to $2,000 per 
academic year. Eligibility and grant amount are determined by the 
Pennsylvania Higher.Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA). 
Students apply directly for this grant by completing a PHEAA/ 
Federal Student Aid form. The deadline for application is usually 
May 1 prior to the start of the academic year for which the aid is 
requested. 



199 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Financial Assistance 



Other State Many states provide grants to their residents which can be used 

Scholarships at colleges in other states. These states are Maryland, Ohio, 

Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts and West Virginia. 
Prospective students should contact their high school guidance 
office, their state higher education office, or College 
Misericordia's financial aid office to learn more about their 
state programs and to obtain applications. 

Presidential La recognition of College Misericordia's Sixtieth Anniversary 

Scholarships and the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the United States 

Constitution, the College has established Presidential 
Scholarships to be awarded to incoming freshmen intending to 
enroll in pre-law or the humanities. High school senior 
applicants should rank in the upper 10% of their class and have 
achieved SAT or ACT scores in the eightieth percentile or 
better. Full, half and honorary tuition awards are made. 
Application packets are available from the Admissions Office. 

College Grants Honor Scholarships 

To demonstrate its commitment to academic excellence, the 
College awards financial assistance to incoming freshmen and 
transfer students who have attained outstanding academic 
records. The scholarships are renewable until graduation, 
provided minimum grade point averages are maintained: 
freshman year - 3.0 cumulative average; sophomore year - 3.2 
cumulative average; junior year - 3.4 cumulative average. 
Students apply directly to the Admissions Office of the College 
for Honor Scholarships. 

College Grants 

Through its own fund raising efforts. College Misericordia 
maintains an extensive college grant program which helps over 
50 percent of Misericordia students meet their college costs. 
Students who receive College Grants must maintain satisfactory 
academic progress. The College Grant program assists students 
with financial need who also participate in the activities of the 
College community. 
Loans Stafford Guaranteed Student Loan 

This program enables students to borrow directly from a bank 
or other participating lender. Currently, if financial need is 
demonstrated students may borrow up to $2,652 for the first 
and second years, and up to $4,000 for the third and fourth 
years. The interest rate is seven, eight or nine percent, 
depending upon when the student first borrows. Students must 
maintain satisfactory academic progress for subsequent loans. 
Repayment begins six months after the student leaves school or 
enrolls in fewer than six credits. The exact amount of loan 
eligibility is determined by this formula: educational costs 
minus financial aid, minus expected family contribution. A 
qualifying factor is full- or part-time status. Loan checks may 
only be accepted if their term dates are concurrent with the 
present enrollment period. Applications and other information 
may be obtained from the applicant's lender. 



200 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan) 
This program provides loans at the low interest rate of five 
percent to students with financial need. Students must be enrolled 
at least half-time to receive this aid. Federal regulations provide 
that a student may borrow up to $3,000 for the first two 
undergraduate years with a $6,000 maximum if funds are 
available. Repayment begins nine months after graduation or 
withdrawal for new borrowers, and six or nine months after 
graduation or withdrawal depending upon when the student first 
borrows. Deferments of repayments and cancellation provisions are 
available for certain types of employment. 

Students are notified of the award of such loans by a letter from 
the College. 

Nursing Loans 

Nursing students who demonstrate financial need may apply for 
low interest, five percent Nursing Loans through the College's 
financial aid office. Repayment begins six months after graduation 
or withdrawal. Provisions for deferment of repayment are 
available from the financial aid office. 

Alternative Loans 

This loan program provides up to full college costs to eligible 
students who make application with some credit-worthy person as 
a co-signer. The current interest rate on the loan is 9.5% with 
several options for repayment. Ordinarily, repayment begins 60 
days after the loan is disbursed with up to ten years to repay. In 
cases of financial hardship, the Pennsylvania Higher Education 
Assistance Agency may permit the student to make interest only 
payments on a quarterly basis. Additional information and 
applications are available from the financial aid office. 

Supplemental Loans 

This loan program is available to independent undergraduate 
students. The annual borrowing limit is $4,000. The interest rate 
varies annually but will not exceed 12%. The current interest rate 
is 10.45%. Although repayment of the principal is deferred until 
six months after graduation, quarterly interest payments must be 
made sixty days after disbursement of the loan funds. Applications 
are available from banks, savings and loan associations and credit 
unions. 

PLUS Loans 

This loan program is available to parents of dependent students. 
The borrowing limit-and interest rate is the same as the 
Supplemental Loan. Repayment on both principal and interest 
begins sixty days after disbursement with up to ten years to repay. 
Applications are available from banks, savings and loan 
associations and credit unions. 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Financial Assistance 



Employment College Work-Stud) 

Funded by the Federal government and the College, this 
program provides part-time jobs for students during the 
academic year and the summer. Jobs are available on campus 
and in the local community. Students must document financial 
need to be eligible. Whenever possible, students will be 
assigned jobs related to their educational interests. 

Institutional Work-Study 

The College maintains this work-study program entirely through 
its own funds. It assists students who are not eligible for the Federal 
program but who need to earn part of their college expenses 
through employment. 

Part-Time Jobs 

Some part-time employment is available in the community for 
students. The College's placement office can provide more 
information. 

Financial Aid Some grants, loans and part-time employment opportunities are 

for Part-Time available to part-time students who carry at least six (6) credits. 

Students Eligibility information and applications are available from the 

financial aid office. 



202 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Endowed Scholarships 



Individuals and businesses close to College Misericordia sponsor 
scholarships which are available to qualified students each year. 

Eligibility criteria and award information are available in the 
financial aid office. 

Academic Endowment Scholarship 

Alumni Endowment Scholarship 

Frances Wilchek Beisel Scholarship 

Father John Bendik Scholarship 

Bishop's Scholarship 

Carole Flanagan Zoeller Brown Scholarship 

Bridget Carney Scholarship 

Theresa H. Shiner Decker Scholarship 

Jay Dugan Scholarship 

Faculty Endowment Scholarship 

Fine Arts Scholarship 

Jean Chorazy Fink Scholarship 

Dallas Junior Women's League Scholarship 

Helen Barbara Fogel Scholarship 

Fortinsky Scholarship 

Gates/Millnamow Scholarship 

General Scholarship 

InterMetro Industries Scholarship 

Walter A. Janasie Scholarship 

Genevieve Mullin Kimbro Scholarship 

Helen McCarthy Kirk Scholarship 

Rev. William Hill, SJ and Sr. William Joseph 

Lydon, RSM Scholarship 
Sister Celestine McHale, RSM Scholarship 
Margaret C. Morrissey Scholarship 
Moylan Scholarship 
John Mullany Scholarship 

Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation Scholarship 
Helen O'Connor Scholarship 
Jeremiah and Ita O'Donnell Scholarship 
John Randolph Scholarship 
Rosenn Scholarship 
Sisters of Mercy Scholarship 
Cathy Stefanchik Scholarship 
Dr. Joseph S. Tomasovic Scholarship 
Leona M. Ulichney Scholarship 



203 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Refund Po. . 



Institutional 

Refund 

Policies 

Full-Time 

Students 

Withdrawals 



Change of 

Academic 

Status 



When a full-time student withdraws from the College, he or 
she must file an official notice of withdrawal with the 
Academic Dean. The percentage of the charges refunded is 
determined by the date the Academic Dean receives official 
notice. 

Tuition and Board refunds are granted as follows: 

Time of Withdrawal Amount 

First Week 100 Percent 

Second Week 75 percent 

Third Week 50 percent 

Fourth Week 25 percent 

No refunds of charges are allowed after the fourth week. 

Course fees are refundable only during the drop/add period 
(as indicated on the official college academic calendar). No 
refunds are awarded on course fees after this period. 

If the refund procedure results in a credit balance on a 
student's account and if that student receives financial aid, the 
financial aid must be proportionately reduced according to 
Title IV refund procedure stipulated by Federal regulations, 
and restored to the appropriate financial aid funds. The 
calculation for Title IV refund procedure is based upon the 
following formula: 

Title IV Aiddess Work-Studv) Xapplicable=amount refunded to 
All aid for payment period refund Title IV funds 

(less Work-Study) 

There are no refunds to students who are dismissed from the 
College. There are no refunds on any other fees, including 
advance registration deposits or room deposits. 

When a student withdraws from a residence hall or off-campus 
housing, he or she must notify the Dean of Students in 
writing. Room charges are not refundable. Room damage fees 
are refundable upon written request to the Dean of Students. 

If a student drops from full- to part-time status after two 
weeks of classes, no adjustments will be made to the tuition 
charges originally assessed nor to financial aid. 

However, if a student drops from full- to part-time during the 
first two weeks of classes, adjustments to tuition charges will 
be made as follows: 



1. The full-time tuition charges originally assessed will be 

reduced according to the official date on the drop add 
slip from the Academic Dean's office, and by applying 
a percentage of adjustment based on the following: 



204 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Refund Policies 



First Week 100% refund of tuition 

Second Week 75% refund of tuition 

No adjustment will be made after the second week. 

2. Part-time tuition charges will then be computed by 
multiplying the actual number of credits being taken after 
the drop, by the appropriate per credit charge. 

3. The part-time charge (from step 2) will be added to the- 
amount of full-time tuition charge remaining on account 
after the adjustment is made to full-time charges in step 1. 
The result will yield the adjusted tuition charge assessed 
for the semester. 

Example: 

A full-time business student is originally assessed a $3,135 
tuition charge. During the second week of classes (75% 
refund period) the student drops from full-time to 1 1 
credits. Tuition charges are adjusted as follows: 

$3,135.00 Full-time tuition charge 

x -75 750/0 refund policy 

$2,351.25 Amount of reduction of full-time 

tuition charges 

$3,135.00 Original full-time tuition charge 

-2,351.25 Amount of reduction 

$ 783.75 Amount of full-time tuition charge 

remaining on account (25%). 

$ 150.00 Per credit tuition rate for business courses 

x 1 1 Number of credits after drop 

$1,650.00 Part-time tuition charges 

$1,650.00 Part-time tuition charge 

+ 783.75 Amount of full-time tuition remaining on 

$2,433.75 Adjusted tuition charge for semester 



If a credit balance is generated to the student's account as a 
result of the above adjustment, financial aid will be pro- 
portionately reduced based on Title IV refund procedures and 
restored to the appropriate financial aid funds. 

Part-Time When a part-time student drops a course or withdraws from a 

Students course, official notice must be filed with the Continuing 

Education Office or the Registrar's Office . Should a part-time 
student withdraw from the college, she/he must notify the 
Academic Dean in writing. 



:o5 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Refund Policies 



Drops 



Withdrawals 



Day and Once 
Per Week 
Evening Classes 



.end 
College Classes 



Accelerated 
Evening Classes 



During the Drop/Add period specified in the official college 
calendar, a part-time student will receive a 100% tuition 
and course fee refund on all courses dropped. 

Tuition refunds are based on the date the Continuing 
Education Office receives official notice from a student 
indicating his/her desire to withdraw from a course. 

The percentage of tuition refund is as follows: 
First Week 100 percent 
Second Week 75 percent 
Third Week 50 percent 
Fourth Week 25 percent 
No refunds are allowed after the fourth week. 

The percentage of tuition refund is as follows: 

100 percent prior to the 2nd class meeting 
50 percent prior to the 3rd class meeting 
No refund after the 3rd class meeting. 

The percentage of tuition refund is as follows: 

100 percent prior to the 3rd class meeting 
50 percent prior to the 4th class meeting 
No refund after the 4th class meeting. 



Summer 
School Classes 



The percentage of tuition refund is as follows: 

100 percent prior to the 3rd class meeting 
75 percent prior to the 4th class meeting 
50 percent prior to the 5th class meeting 
25 percent prior to the 6th class meeting 
No refund after the 6th class meeting. 

All refund percentages are computed from charges to the 
student, not from the amount paid. 

Course fees are refundable only during the drop/add period. 
There are no refunds to students dismissed from the 
College. Advance registration deposits and any other fees 
are not refundable. 



Stafford Guaranteed 
Student Loans 



If the refund procedure results in a credit balance on a 
student's account and that student receives financial aid, the 
financial aid must be adjusted proportionately according to 
Title IV refund procedure. The financial aid director can 
provide clarification of this procedure. 

Refunds of overpayment caused by Guaranteed Student 
Loans will be made in accordance with regular refund 
policy. Refunds will then be processed in the Comptroller's 
Office within ten working days from the date of receipt of a 
written request. 



206 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 

Refund Policies 



Refunds of credit balances on student accounts caused by 
overpayment (either from financial aid or personal transaction) will 
not be processed until after the fourth week of classes has been 
completed each semester. 

Checks will be issued ten working days after the fourth week of 
classes. Refund checks, therefore, will not be issued until the sixth 
week of classes. 

The ten working days give the comptroller time to verify the amount 
of refund, to check on any other charges, and to confer with the 
financial aid director. 

Student refund requests must be submitted by the student in 
writing, and must be approved by the comptroller and the financial 
aid director. Refund application forms are available in the 
comptroller's office. Students are advised to begin the academic 
year with sufficient funds to pay for books and living expenses until 
refund checks are issued. 



207 

COLLEGE LIFE 



Student College Misericordia students take their education seriously 

Activities but recognize that academics are only one part of the 

College experience. Many students get involved in extra- 
curricular activities; some offered by the College and others 
by the students themselves. 



An active Student Government, which is the liaison among 
students, faculty, and the administration enables students to 
become involved in a decision making process which affect 
their governance. The Student Government Association 
consists of 1 1 executive board members, 8 with voting power 
and 3 without as well as the 4 class governments. 

In addition to Student Government, some 25 chartered clubs 
and organizations provide opportunities in a wide variety of 
student interests. These activities might include comedy and 
novelty acts, educational workshops, musical attractions, 
publications, performing art shows, and much more. 

Other services offered through the Activities Department 
include: discount movie ticket sales, individual "Student 
Activity Profiles", Leadership development programs, F.M. 
Kirby ticket sales, room reservations for lounges and 
meeting rooms on campus, orientation programs, game room 
equipment loans, activities information resource for 
programming and fundraising, Weekly Bulletin, Semesterly 
Activities Calendar, computer messages in the Student 
Center. 



Athletics Intercollegiate athletics at College Misericordia include 

women's basketball, soccer, Softball, field hockey, volleyball, 
and tennis. Men compete at the intercollegiate level in 
basketball, baseball, tennis, golf and soccer. 

Members of the student body, faculty and administration 
enjoy an intramural athletic program which includes co-ed 
flag football, soccer, basketball, volleyball and softball. 

Bookstore The campus bookstore is a meeting place of, and adjunct to, 

both the academic and social life of the college. It is an 
academically oriented resource, where the need for, and 
interest in, reading and study engendered in the classroom 
can be nurtured and reinforced. It is also a social focal point 
on the campus offering many goods and services required b) 
a college community. The main purpose of the campus 
bookstore is to provide for the sale of book and supply 
requirements connected with the academic programs of the 
college and the sale of such other supplies and sen ices as 
shall be determined from time to time. 



208 



COLLEGE LIFE 



Campus College Misericordia is a Catholic college and, as such, offers 

Ministry students many different ways to express religious faith and 

values. Students of all denominations find the Campus Ministry 
program a focus for religious, social and community service 
activities. 

In keeping with the College's Mercy tradition of justice and 
compassion, Campus Ministry sponsors empowerment programs 
which not only serve others but serve students also by giving 
them opportunities to form and test their own sets of values. 

Careers and The College offers a career and placement service for enrolled 

Placement students as well as alumni. 

For some students, career choices are easy; for others such a 
decision may seem to be unreachable. Career counselors assist 
students through individual counseling and testing, workshops 
on communication skills, personal growth, and decision making. 

As students approach graduation, the careers and placement 
office provides guidance in resume writing, scheduling job 
interviews, or in applying to graduate school. Any student 
seeking part-time employment off campus may apply at the 
Placement Office. Work-study placements on campus are 
assigned through the Financial Aid Office. 

Commuter All of the College's services and extracurricular programs are 

Council available to commuting students, encouraging full participation 

in campus activities by both commuter and resident students. 

The Commuter Council, a student-organized association, is 
attentive to the needs and concerns of non-resident students. 
The Council addresses both the academic and social aspects of 
college life for commuters. 

Counseling The counseling service, located in Alumnae Hall, Lower Level, 

Service offers the opportunity for consultation with counselors in regard 

to a wide variety of issues. 

Specifically, counselors work with individual students and small 
groups on career exploration, stress management, developmental 
issues and personal" concerns. 

Both testing and counseling services are available, without cost, 
to all students. All interviews are confidential. 



209 

COLLEGE LIFE 



Library The Francesca McLaughlin Memorial Library is located on the second 

floor of the Administration Building. Named after Sister M. Francesca 
McLaughlin, R.S.M., a librarian at the College for more than twenty- 
five years, the facility encompasses 15,000 square feet and houses 
stacks for 90,000 volumes. 

The library's bright and congenial atmosphere is enhanced by art 
works, plants, modern furnishings and displays of photographs of the 
College and its history. 

The library provides materials and services which support the 
educational objectives of the college. Faculty and students have access 
to many types of materials, including books, periodicals, reference 
search tools, audio-visuals and microforms. The library maintains a 
special collection of ANA and NLN nursing publications and selected 
award-winning books in children's literature. 

An automated circulation system enables the staff to track all 
materials in use and issue overdue notices to delinquent borrowers. 
Students must present a valid I.D. card at the desk when borrowing 
materials. The College Misericordia I.D. card may also be used to 
borrow books directly from a number of local and regional libraries in 
the area library consortium. 

College Misericordia is a member of the Northeastern Pennsylvania 
Bibliographic Center, the area consortium of regional academic, 
public, and medical libraries. As an affiliate of the Pennsylvania 
Library Information Network (PALINET), Misericordia subscribes to 
the cataloging and interlibrary loan system of the Online Computer 
Library Center (OCLC) in Dublin, Ohio. Online database searching is 
available to students and faculty at the computer station located in the 
central services area of the library. 

The ILL subsystem affords faculty and students instant access to the 
holdings information of all OCLC participating libraries. Deliveries 
are provided through membership in the Interlibrarv Delivery Service 
(IDS). 

Students have access to computer based instruction tutorials on reserve 
at the circulation desk. The library also circulates other computer 
software for use in the third floor computer labs. 

During freshman orientation, staff members introduce students to the 
various library resources and services. Library skills programs on 
cassettes and filmstrips are available at the A-V learning stations at 
the beginning of each semester. Individual instruction is available 
from the reference librarian or other staff members upon request. 

The library is open 82 hours per week, including Saturdays and 
Sundays during the academic year. Special hours for vacation periods 
and summer session are posted. 



210 



COLLEGE LIFE 



Residence The College operates five resident facilities: McHale, Alumnae, 

Halls McAuley-Walsh, Carlow and Mercy Halls. All rooms are designed for 

double occupancy; a very limited number of single rooms are 

available. 



The environment in the residence halls is one of living and learning. A 
vital part of the students' total educational experience is the 
relationship that grows from living and sharing with others in the 
residence halls. Resident students participate in making decisions 
affecting resident life. The residence life program strives to create an 
intellectual and friendly atmosphere conducive to academic 
achievement and personal growth. Each of the residence halls is 
secure, furnished with beds, desks, bureaus, and closets, and is 
conveniently located on campus. Each building houses study rooms, 
laundry facilities, and recreational lounges. 



Student ALL SERVICES ARE CONFIDENTIAL 

Health The Health Services Office, located in Alumnae Dorm 1st floor, is 

Services under the administrative jurisdiction of the Dean of Student Services. 

The Health Center is directed by a Registered Nurse with a Masters 
Degree in Nursing Administration, who functions under the medical 
guidance of the college physician. The physician is on campus one 
hour a week and is available for advice and referral. Services provided 
by the physician at the Health Center are free to the students. 
Prescription medication may be obtained at a local pharmacy, and 
incurred expenses may be billed to the student's home address. 

The Health Center provides first aid, assessment and treatment of 
common illnesses, referral for more serious health conditions, 
temporary care until transfer can be arranged to local medical facility, 
dorm visits when appropriate, health counseling and education, 
maintenance of health records and assistance with student athletic 
insurance claims. Ace bandages, crutches, vaporizers, heating pads and 
non-prescription medications are available, free of charge, at the 
Health Center. 

The Health Service Center requires a medical history, physical 
examination, and immunization record to be completed and submitted 
by all new and transfer students before the start of the academic 
semester year. Students enrolled in allied health majors (Nursing, 
Occupational Therapy, and Radiography) have additional yearly 
requirements as mandated by their respective divisions. 

Due to the fact there is no 24-hour health care available on campus, 
students requiring hospitalization, or those afflicted with acute or long 
term illness that requires several days in bed and restriction from 
classes, will be required to go home until normal activity and class 
attendance can be resumed. Decisions to allow students with illness to 
stay on campus or to be sent home are at the discretion of the College 
physician. 



COLLEGE LIFE 



EMERGENCY COVERAGE is provided by the Health Center during 
regular clinic hours. Emergencies occurring when the Health Center is 
not open are handled by appropriate dorm R.A. (Resident Assistant) 
and/or Security. Security and/or R.A. will contact the local rescue unit 
for assistance. Students who elect to use their own personal vehicles to 
transport others are NOT covered by College insurance in case of an 
accident. 

TRANSPORTATION Students with private vehicles are responsible 
for providing their own transportation to doctor/dental and other types 
of off-campus appointments. Whenever the Health Services Center is 
open, emergencies will he handled by that office. At all other times 
emergencies will be cleared by appropriate dorm R.A. and/or Security 
on a case by case basis. 

HEALTH INSURANCE All dorm residents and students participating 
in intercollegiate athletics are required to enroll in the college health 
insurance plan OR provide xeroxed proof of membership coverage in 
their parents' health insurance plan. The College health insurance plan 
is designed to assist you in defraying the cost of medical care you may 
need during the year (full year plan includes summer coverage). Your 
college health insurance coverage will not cover all of your medical 
expenses. The college plan has a "no deductible coverage." Health 
Service Center will assist the student in filling out major medical claim 
forms: however primary responsibility rests with the student. 

Health Service Center hours are 9:00 a.m.- 3:30 p.m. Monday thru 
Friday. The Health Center is closed on the week-end. 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Stephen M. Alinikoff 
Security First, Inc. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Terry S. Baltimore 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Leo C. Beebe 
Chairman, K-Tron Corp. 
Process Control Division 
Pittman, New Jersey 

Virginia Bertschi, R.S.M. 
Assistant Director of Education 
Diocese Altoona-Johnstown 
Hallidaysburg, Pennsylvania 

Helen Marie Burns, R.S.M. 
Vice President 

Sisters of Mercy of the Union 
Silver Spring, Maryland 

John Churnetski, P.E. 

Chairman of the Board of Trustees 

Chief Executive Officer 
Quad Three Group, Inc. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Richard Connor 
President & Publisher 
Fort Worth Star Telegram 
Fort Worth, Texas 

Mary C. Denny, R.S.M. 
President, Members of the College 
Provincial Administrator 
Sisters of Mercy Provincialate 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

Auxiliary Bishop Francis X. DiLorenzo, 
S.T.D., D.D. 

Diocese of Scranton 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Pasquale DiPasquale, Jr. 

President 

College Misericordia 

Dallas, Pennsylvania 

Hanford L. Eckman 
President, Encon 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 



Ronald D. Ertley 
David Ertley, Inc. 
Kingston, Pennsylvania 

Charles D. Flack, Jr. 

Diamond Manufacturing Company 

Wyoming, Pennsylvania 

Glenn Y. Forney 

President & Chief Executive Officer 

United Penn Bank 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Louis F. Goeringer 

President, Bertels Can Company 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

James D. Harkins 
Chief Executive Officer 
Penn State Seed Company 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

Jane Frances Kennedy, R.S.M. 
Sisters of Mercy 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Sarah Ellen Lenahan 

Vice President of Human Resources 

Devereaux Foundation 

Devon, Pennsylvania 

William R. Mainwaring 

President & Chief Executive Officer 

First Eastern Bank 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

James J. Manley 
Executive Vice President 
Shearson- Lehman -Hutton 
New York, New York 

Marilyn Maslow 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

John A. McCole 
General Manager 
MONY Financial Services 
Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania 
Trustee Emeritus 

Cecilia Meighan, Esq., R.S.M. 
Gallagher, Brennan, & Gill 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



John C. Metz 
Metz Enterprises 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

M. Concilia Moran, R.S.M. 

Senior Vice President for Mission 

Effectiveness 

Mercy Health Services 

Farmington Hills, Michigan 

Dr. Edward Nork 
Kingston, Pennsylvania 

The Honorable Peter Paul Olszewski 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

John M. Randolph, Jr. 

Parente, Randolph, Orlando, Carey & 

Associates 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Trustee Emeritus 



Rose Carmel Scalone, R.S.M. 
Maternity Center Association 
New York, New York 

Ernest Scheller, Jr. 

Chairman 

Silberline Manufacturing Co., Inc. 

Lansford, Pennsylvania 

Margaret Spengler 
Arlington, Massachusetts 

Marie Turnbach, R.S.M. 
Associate Provincial Administrator 
Sisters of Mercy Provincialate 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

Murray Ufberg, Esq. 

Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees 

Rosenn, Jenking & Greenwald 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 



Harold Rosenn, Esq. 
Rosenn, Jenkins & Greenwald 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Trustee Emeritus 



14 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Administration 



Senior 
Administration 



President 

Pasquale DiPasquale, Jr., B.A., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Executive Vice-President 

Bruce L. Wilson, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Academic Dean, 

Sr. Mary Glennon, R.S.M., B.A., M.A., Ed.D. 

Dean of Financial and Administrative Affairs, 
Thomas E. O'Neil, B.S., M.Ed. 

Dean of Admissions, 

David M. Payne, B.S., M.A. 

Dean of Students, 

Scott J. Kalicki, B.A., M.A. 

Executive Director of Institutional Advancement, 

Linda Stallone, B.A. 



Academic 
Affairs 



Division of Allied 
Health Professions 

Division of Business 
Administration 



Dean, Mary Glennon, R.S.M. 

Assistant to the Dean, 

Katherine Flanagan-Herstek, B.S., M.S. 

Ms. Elaine Halesey 
Chair 

Mr. Gale Rand 
Chair 



Division of Humanities 



Dr. Donald Fries 
Chair 



Division of Natural Science. 
Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

Division of Nursing 



Mr. Carl Konecke 
Chair 



Dr. Gertrude Torres 
Chair 



Division of Professional 
Studies 

Academic Computer 
Systems 

Act 101 



Mr. James Calderone 
Acting Chair 

Director, Patricia Lapczynski, R.S.M., B.A., M.S. 



Director, William A. Burns, B.S., M.S., M.A. 
Counselor, Geraldine Wall, B.S., M.S. 
Counselor, Stella Lushis, B.S., M.S. 



215 



COLLEGE DIRECTORS 

Administration 



Alternative Learners 
Pro 



Art Gallery 



Continuing Education 
Accelerated Degree Programs 
Center for Professional Development 
Conferences/ Institutes 
Credit Free Programs 
Part-Time Students 
Summer Sessions 
Weekend College 
H'orkshops 

Director of Freshman 
Year Experience 

Honors Program 
Library Services 



Director, Joseph Rogan, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. 
Program Coordinator, Carole Fisher, B.S.W. 
Program Coordinator, Connie Havir, B.A., M.Ed. 
Program Coordinator, Patricia Marie McCann, R.S.M., B.S., 

M S 
Director, Brian Benedetti, B.A..M.A. 
Assistant Director, Allison Maslow 

Director, Thomas J. O'Neill, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Director, Bonnie Sutton, B.S.W., M.S.S., MLS. P. 



Registrar's Office 



Kathleen A. Foley, B.S., M.S. 

Director, Regina Kelly, R.S.M., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Director, Mary Sharon Gallagher, R.S.M., B.A., M.S.L.S. 

Reference and Serials Librarian, Joseph Luksic, B.A., 
M.S.L.S. 

Aquisitions Librarian, Charles Riedlinger, A.B., M.L.S. 

Archivist, Sister Mary Carmel McGarigle, R.S.M., B.M., 
M.M., M.S. 

Registrar, Paula Wilkes, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Registrar, Donna Hooper, B.A. 



Administration and Planning 

Business and 
Fiscal Affairs 



Computer Services 



Dean of Financial and Administrative 
Affairs, Thomas E. O'Neil, B.S., M.Ed. 

Business Manager, Joseph Haver, B.S., M.B.A. 

Comptroller, John J. Hoover, B.S. 

Accountant, John Risboskin, B.A., B.S., CPA 

Director, Joseph Mack, B.S., M.B.A. 



216 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Administration 



Institutional Advancement 

Alumni Affairs 

Development 
Prospect Research 
Public Relations 

Publications and Publicity 
Coordinator 

Admissions 



Financial Aid 
Student Services 



Athletics 

Bookstore 
Counseling 

Food Service 
Health Services 
Placement 
Resident Life 



Student Activities 



Religious Life 



Director, Linda Stallone, B.A. 

Director, Deborah Fries, B.A., M.S. 

Grants Officer, Sandra Nobile, B.S., M.P.A. 

Georgetta Potoski, B.S. 

Communications Manager, Gail E. Smallwood, B.J. 

Carol Wall, B.A. 

Dean, David M. Payne, M.A. 

Admissions Systems Manager, Sister Annette Diebold, R.S.M., 

B.A., B.S. 

Senior Counselor, Mary Elizabeth Kutz, B.A. 
Counselor, Mary Lou Schilling, B.A. 
Counselor, Tony Langston, B.S. 

Director, Jane Dessoye, B.A. 

Dean, Scott J. Kalicki, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant to the Dean, Sister Robert Marie Lockman, R.S.M., 
B.S., M.S. 

Director, John Howe, B.A., M.A.T. 

Manager, Diane Morreale 

Counselor, Geraldine Wall, B.S., M.S. 
Counselor, Stella Lucias, B.S., M.S. 

Director, David Paul, A.A.S., A.A.S. 

Director, Charlotte T. Slocum, R.N., B.A., B.S.N. , M.S.N. 

Director, R. Arnold Garinger, B.S., M.A. 

Director, Karen Belli, B.A. 

Resident Counselor, M. Sharon Gallagher, R.S.M., 

B.A., M.S.L.S. 

Resident Counselor, Madeline Gill, R.S.M., B.A., M.Ed. 

Resident Counselor, Ruth Kelly, R.S.M., B.A., M.A. 

Director, Judy Harvey, B.S. 

Chaplain, Rev. John Petrasko, B.A., M.Div. 
Director of Campus Ministry 

Assistant Director of Campus Ministry, 
Cynthia March, R.S.M., B.A. 



217 



COLLEGE DIRECTORS 

The Faculty Senate 



The Florence Bourcier, Ph.D. 

Faculty Division of Nursing 

Senators 



OIney Craft, M.A. 

Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, 
and Computer Science 

Amy Frey-Volpe, M.S. 

Division of Allied Health Professions 

Dennis Fisher, M.S.W. 

Division of Professional Studies 

Hildegard I. Hof, Ph.D. 

Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics 
and Computer Science 

Mari P. King, M.P.A. 

Division of Allied Health Professions 

Martha Kokinda, M.S.N. 
Division of Nursing 

Charles A. La Jeunesse, Ph.D. 

Division of Professional Studies 
Faculty Senate Vice Chair 

Sr. Anne Elizabeth McLaughlin, R.S.M., M.A. 

Division of Humanities 

Gale E. Rand, M.B.A, 

Division of Business 
Faculty Senate Chair 

Donald Skiff. M.B.A. 

Division of Business 
Faculty Senate Secretary 

Da\id C. Wright, M.A. 

Division of Humanities 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Academic Committee Chairs 



Academic Academic Grievance Committee 

Committee Dr. Richard P. Lynch 



Chairs 



Academic Policies Committee 
Dr. Mary Glennon, R.S.M. 

Academic Status Committee 

Ms. Katherine Flanagan-Herstek 

Curriculum Committee 

Mr. Frank Notturno 

Faculty Development Committee 

Mr. James Calderone 

Library Acquisitions Committee 

Mr. Charles Reidlinger 

Faculty Status Committee 
Dr. Mary Glennon, R.S.M. 

Faculty Welfare Committee 

Mr. Carl Konecke 

Research Review Committee 

Dr. Charles LaJeunesse 

Scholarship Committee 

Dr. Louis Maganzin 



:i9 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 
Faculty 



Faculty Halter C. J. Andersen, Associate Professor, Division of 

Humanities, B.F.A. Boston University; M.F.A. Boston University 

Lynn K. Aldrich, Assistant Professor, Division of Natural 
Sciences, Mathematics and Computer Science, B.A. Grinnel 
College; M.S. University of Alabama; B.S. Worchester Polytechnic 
Institute 

Florence Bourcier, Associate Professor, Division of Nursing, B.S. 
Boston College; M.S. Boston College, Ph.D. University of 
Pennsylvania 

Agnes Therese Brennan, R.S.M., Assistant Professor, Div ision of 
Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Computer Science, B.A. College 
Misericordia; M.A. The Catholic University of America 

Mary Joan Burns, Instructor, Division of Nursing, M.S. College 
Misericordia; B.S. Marywood College 

James Calderone, Assistant Professor, Division of Professional 
Studies, B.A. Wilkes College; M.S.S.W. University of Wisconsin 

Mary B. Carden, Assistant Professor, Division of Business 
Administration, B.S. College Misericordia; M.A. New York 
University 

Robert Comello, Instructor, Division of Allied Health Professions, 
A.A.S. College Misericordia; B.S. East Stroudsburg University 

OIney Craft, Associate Professor, Division of Natural Sciences, 
Mathematics and Computer Science, B.A. University of Michigan; 
M.A. University of Michigan 

Fred J. Croop, Assistant Professor, Division of Business, B.S. 
Wilkes College; M.B.A. Wilkes College 

Pasquale DiPasquale, Jr., Professor, Division of Humanities, B.A 
Notre Dame; B.A. Oxford; M.A. Oxford; Ph.D. University of 
Pittsburg 

Stevan L. Davies. Associate Professor, Division of Humanities, 
B.A. Duke University; M.A. Temple University; Ph.D. Temple 
University 

Richard W. Dower, Assistant Professor, Division of Fine Arts, 
A.B. MacMurray College; M.M. Eastman School of Music 

M. Siena Finley, R.S.M., Assistant Professor, Division of 
Humanities, B.S. College Misericordia; M.S. Fordham University 
(on leave) 



220 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Faculty 



Faculty Dennis Fisher, Assistant Professor, Division of Professional Studies, 

B.S. Bloomsburg University; M.Ed. Bloomsburg University; M.S.W. 
Marywood College 

Amy Frey-Volpe, Assistant Professor, Division of Allied Health 
Professions, B.S. Utica College; M.S. Temple University 

Donald O. Fries, Associate Professor, Division of Humanities, B.A. 
University of Michigan; M.A. University of Michigan; Ph.D. Michigan 
State University 

Madeline Gill, R.S.M., Assistant Professor, Division of Humanities, 
B.A. College Misericordia; M.Ed. Boston University 

Cynthia A. Grapczynski, Assistant Professor, Division of Allied Health 
Professions, B.S. Wayne State University; M.S. University of 
Wisconsin- Madison 

Elaine D. Halesey, Assistant Professor, Division of Allied Health 
Professions, A.A.S. College Misericordia; B.S. Bloomsburg University; 
M.S., College Misericordia 

Stephen L. Heater, Professor, Division of Allied Health 
Professions, B.S. University of Buffalo; M.O.T. University of 
Washington, Ed.D. University of Pennsylvania 

Hildegard I. Hof, Assistant Professor, Division of Natural Sciences, 
Mathematics and Computer Science, B.S. North Dakota State 
University; M.S. University of Minnesota; Ph.D. University of 

Minnesota 

Marcie A. Jones, Assistant Professor, Division of Nursing, B.S. N.Ed. 
College Misericordia; B.S.N. College Misericordia; M.S.N. College 
Misericordia 

John L. Kachurick, Assistant Professor, Division of Business 
Administration, B.A. King's College; M.B.A., Wilkes College 

Regina Kelly, R.S.M., Professor, Division of Humanities, B.A. College 
Misericordia; M.A. Catholic University of America; Ph.D. Fordham 
University 

Ruth Kelly, R.S.M., Associate Professor, Division of Humanities, B.A. 
College Misericordia; M.A. Villanova University 

Mari P. King, Instructor, Division of Allied Health Professions, A.A.S. 
College Misericordia; B.S. College Misericordia; M.P.A. Marywood 
College 

Stanley S. Knapich, Professor, Division of Allied Health Professions, 
B.S. Wilkes College; M.Ed. Pennsylvania State University; D.Ed. 
Pennsylvania State University 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 
ulty 



Facult> Martha Ann Kokinda, Assistant Professor, Division of Nursing, 

B.S.N. Ed. College Misericordia; M.S.N. Catholic University of 
America 



Mary Louise Komorek, Assistant Professor, Division of Nursing, 
B.S.N. College Misericordia; M.S. University of Scranton; M.S. 
Columbia University Teachers College 

Carl J. Konecke, Associate Professor, Division of Natural 
Sciences, Mathematics and Computer Science, B.S. King's College; 
M.S. University of Nebraska 

Joan L. Krause, Associate Professor, Division of Allied Health 
Professions, B.S. College Misericordia; M.S. Marywood College; 
M.S. University of Scranton 

Kathryn Monica Kruger, Assistant Professor, Division of 
Professional Studies, B.S. East Stroudsburg University; 
M.Ed. Lehigh University 

Charles A. LaJeunesse, Associate Professor, Division of 
Professional Studies, B.S. University of Missouri; M.Ed. University 
of Missouri; Ph.D. University of Missouri 

Edward Latarewicz, Associate Professor, Division of Humanities, 
B.A. St. Bonaventure University; M.A. St. Bonaventure University 

Patricia J. Lewis, Assistant Professor, Division of Professional 
Studies, B.S. Wilkes College; M.S.W. Marywood College; D.S.W. 
Hunter College, City University of New York 

Joseph Luksic, Assistant Professor, Reference and Serials 
Librarian, B.A. King's College; M.S.L.S. Marywood College 

Richard P. Lynch, Associate Professor, Division of Humanities, 
B.A. St. Michael's College; M.A. Southern Illinois University; 
Ph.D. Southern Illinois University 

Louis Maganzin, Professor, Division of Humanities, B.A. St. 
Bonaventure University; M.A. Georgetown University; Ph.D. 
Georgetown University 

Patricia Marie McCann, R.S.M., Assistant Professor, Division of 
Professional Studies, B.S. College Misericordia; M.S. University of 
Scranton 

Mary Theresa McGuire, R.S.M., Assistant Professor, Division of 
Professional Studies, B.A. College Misericordia; M.S. Temple 
University 

Anne Elizabeth McLaughlin. R.S.M., Assistant Professor. Division 
of Humanities, B.S. College Misericordia; M.A. Catholic 
Universitv of America 



::; 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Faculty 



Faculty Patricia Milavec, Instructor, Division of Allied Health, B.S. Temple 

University 

Kathleen M. Nolan, Associate Professor, Division of Professional 
Studies, B.S. D'Youville College; M.A. George Washington University; 
Ph.D. St. Louis University 

Francis Lee Notturno, Assistant Professor, Division of Business, 
B.B.A. Pennsylvania State University; M.B.A. Fairleigh Dickinson 
University 

Betty Wallace Porzuczek, Assistant Professor, Division of Fine Arts, 
B.M. University of Iowa; M.A. University of Iowa 

Gale E. Rand, Assistant Professor, Division of Business, B.B.A. Case- 
Western Reserve University; M.B.A. University of Arkansas 

Charles Riedlinger, Assistant Professor, Acquisitions Librarian, B.A. 
Wilkes College; M.L.S. University of Pittsburgh 

Joseph P. Rogan, Professor, Division of Professional Studies, B.S. 
Kutztown University; M.S. Marywood College; Ed.D. Lehigh 
University 

Rosemary S. Savelli, Associate Professor, Division of Humanities, B.A. 
College Misericordia; M.A. University of Scranton; J.D. Catholic 
University of America 

Mazen Shahin, Associate Professor, Division of Natural Sciences, 
Mathematics and Computer Science, B.S. Alexandria University; Ph.D., 
Lvov State University 

Francis Siracuse, Assistant Professor, Division of Natural Sciences, 
Mathematics and Computer Science, B.S. University of Scranton; M.S. 
John Carroll University 

Donald C. Skiff, Assistant Professor, Division of Business 
Administration, B.A. Parsons College; M.B.A. Youngstown State 
University 

Donna Ayres Snelson, Assistant Professor, Division of Nursing, 
B.S. N.Ed. Wilkes College; M.S.N. University of Pennsylvania 

Thomas Swartwood, Instructor, Division of Allied Health, B.A. 
University of Pennsylvania; B.S. College Misericordia 

Gertrude Torres, Professor, Division of Nursing, B.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia 
University; Ed.D. Teachers College, Columbia University 



David C. Wright, Associate Professor, Division of Humanities, B.A. 
Kenyon College; M.A. University of Wisconsin-Madison 



>23 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Alumni Association Board of Directors 



Alumni Association Board of Directors Judith Gardner-Price, Esq. ' 

1989-90 President 

Margaret Da>itt '77 
President-Elect 

Bernadine Tomasek '52 
Secretary 

Charles Vanderhoff '88 
Treasurer 

Margaret Husic Spengler '36 

Alumni Trustee 

Carol Gallagher, RSM '66 

Director at Large 

William M. Jones '85 

Director at Large 

Bernadine Dougalas Luksic '59 

Director at Large 

Mary Elizabeth Rienzo Noll '47 
Director at Large 

David Payne, Jr. '85 

Director at Large 

Mary Jule Purcell McCarthy '52 

Director at Large 

Marie Angelella George, Ph.D. '71 
Director at Large 

Judy Frantz '78 
Director at Large 

Suzanne Lawson '91 

Student Representative 

Roberta Day-Klein, DC. '74 
Annual Giving Chair 1989-90 

Agnes Conway Williamson '29 

Director Emeritus 

Benedicta North Matchett '56 

Director of Volunteers 

Deborah M. Fries '81, MS '85 
Director of Alumni Relations 



1989-1990 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
with Administrative Dates 



Fall Semester 1989 



Thurs.-Fri. 



August 24-25* 



Thursday August 24 

Sun.-Mon. August 27-28 

Tuesday August 29 

Wednesday August 30 

Monday September 4 

Tuesday September 5 

Thursday September 7 

Thursday September 28 

Thursday October 5 

Mon.-Thurs. October 9-12 

Friday October 13 

Weds. -Sun. October 18-22 

Monday October 23 

Tuesday November 7 

Weds.-Tues. November 8-14 

Weds. -Sun. November 22-26 

Monday November 27 

Friday December 15 

Sat. -Sun. December 16-17 

Mon.-Fri. December 18-22 

Wednesday Jan. 3, 1990 
*Details to be announced upon consultation 



Academic Dean/Division Chairs Meeting 

Division Meetings 

New Employee Orientation 

General Faculty Meeting 

Last Day to Remove Traditional Summer 
Session Incompletes 

Fall New Student Orientation 

First Day of Semester for All Students 
Opening Convocation/Mass/Advising/ No 
Day Classes; Evening Classes will be held 

First Day of Classes 

No Day or Evening Classes; Labor Day 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

Add Period ends 4:00 p.m. 

Drop Period ends 4:00 p.m. /End of Refunds 

Last Day to Withdraw from Courses Without 
Academic Penalty 

Mid-Term Week 

Mid-Term Grades Due in Registrar's Office 3:30 p.m. 

Fall Recess 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

No Day or Evening Classes; Advisement Day 

Pre-Registration for Spring Semester 

Thanksgiving Recess; No Day or Evening Classes 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

Last Day of Classes 

Study Weekend 

Final Exams 

Grades Due in Registrar's Office; 3:30 p.m. 

with Dr. DiPasquale. 






1989-1990 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
with Administratis Dates 



Spring Semester 1990 

Tuesday January 16 



Wednesday 

Monday 
Frida\ 
Monday 
Monday 

Mon.-Fri. 

Monday 

Tues.-Sun. 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Thurs.-Mon. 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Wed. -Wed. 

Friday 

Sat. -Sun. 

Mon.-Fri. 

Monday 

Saturday 



January 17 
January 22 
February 9 
February 19 
February 26 

Feb. 26-Mar. 2 
March 5 
March 6-1 1 
March 12 
March 27 

April 12-16 
April 17 
April 25 
April 25-May 2 
May 4 
May 5-6 
May 7-11 
May 14 
May 19 



Spring New Student Orientation 

First Day of Classes for All Students 

Add Period ends 4:00 p.m. 

Last Day to Remove Incompletes 

Drop Period ends 4:00 p.m. /End of Refunds 

Last Day to Withdraw from Courses Without 
Academic Penalty 

Mid-Term Week 

Mid-Term Grades Due in Registrar's Office; 3:30 p.m. 

Winter Recess Begins After 4:00 p.m.; No Evening Classes 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

Faculty Development Workshop; Evening 
Classes Will be Held 

No Day or Evening Classes: Easter Recess 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

No Day or Evening Classes; Advisement Day 

Pre-Registration for Spring Semester 

Last Day of Classes 

Study Weekend 

Final Exams 

Final Grades Due in Registrar's Office; 3:30 p.m. 

Baccalaureate and Commencement 



226 



1990-1991 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
with Administrative Dates 



Fall Semester 1990 

Thur.-Fri. August 23-24* 



Friday August 24 

Sun.-Mon. August 26-27 
Tuesday August 28 



Wednesday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Thursday 

Thursday 

Thursday 

Thur.-Tues. 

Wednesday 

Wed. -Sun. 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Weds.-Tues. 

Weds. -Sun. 

Monday 

Friday 

Sat. -Sun. 

Mon.-Fri. 

Thursday 

* Details to 



August 29 
September 3 
September 4 
September 6 
September 27 
October 4 

October 11-16 
October 17 
October 24-28 
October 29 
November 6 
November 7-13 
November 21-25 
November 26 
December 14 
December 15-16 
December 17-21 
January 3, 1991 
be announced upon 



Academic Dean/Division Chairs Meeting 

Division Meetings 

New Employee Orientation 

General Faculty Meeting 

Last Day to Remove Traditional Summer Session Incompletes 

New Student Orientation 

First Day of Semester for All Students 
Opening Convocation/Mass/Advising/No Day 
Classes; Evening Classes will be held 

First Day of Classes 

No Day or Evening Classes; Labor Day 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

Add Period ends 4:00 p.m. 

Drop Period ends 4:00 p.m. /End of refunds 

Last Day to Withdraw from Courses without 
Academic Penalty 

Mid-Term Week 

Mid-Term Grades Due in Registrar's Office; 3:30 p.m. 

Fall Recess 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

No Day or Evening Classes: Advisement Day 

Pre-Registration for Spring Semester 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

Last Day of Classes 

Study Weekend 

Final Exams 

Final Grades due in Registrar's Office; 3:30 p.m. 

consultation with Dr. DiPasquale. 






1990- 1991 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
with Administrative Dates 



Spring Semester 1991 
Tuesday January 15 

Wednesday January 16 
Monday January 21 



Fridaj 


February 8 


Monday 


February 18 


Monday 


February 25 


Tues.-Sun. 


Feb. 26 - March 3 


Monday 


March 4 


Mon.-Fri. 


March 11-15 


Monday 


March 18 


Thur.-Mon. 


March 28 - April 


Tuesday 


April 2 


Wednesday 


April 10 


Thur.-Wed. 


April 11-17 


Friday 


May 3 


Sat. -Sun. 


May 4-5 


Mon.-Fri. 


May 6-10 


Mondav 


May 13 


Saturday 


May 18 



Spring New Student Orientation 

First Day of Classes for All Students 

Add Period ends 4:00 p.m. 

Last Day to Remove Incompletes 

Drop Period ends 4:00 p.m. /End of Refunds 

Last Day to Withdraw from Courses without 
Academic Penalty 

Winter Break 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

Mid-Term Week 

Mid-Term Grades Due in Registrar's Office; 3:30 p.m. 

No Day or Evening Classes: Easter recess 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

Advisement Day; No Day or Evening Classes 

Pre-Registration for Fall Semester 

Last Day of Classes 

Study Weekend 

Final Exams 

Final Grades due in Registrar's Office; 3:30 p.m. 

Baccalaureate and Commencement 



INDEX 



Academic 

Advising, 174 

Calendar. 224 

Committees. 218 

Dismissal, 177 

Divisions. 4 

Grievance Procedure. 174 

Honors, 175 

Probation, 176 

Program Definitions, 7 

Standing, 176 
Accelerated Degree Program. 187 
unting 

Course Descriptions, 95 

Major(CMA), 14 

Major(CPA), 13 

Minor, 89 
Accreditations. 6 
Act 101, 187 
Activities, Student, 207 
Addictions 

Certification. 15 

Course Descriptions, 98 
Administration. 2 14 
Admissions 

Procedures, 170 

Requirements. 168 
Advanced Placement, 172 
Air Force ROTC, 187 
Alternative Learners Project. 187 
Alumni Association Board of 
Directors. 223 
Army ROTC, 187 
Art Course Descriptions, 99 
Athletics. 207 
Attendance, 178 
Auditing (courses). 194 
B 
Biology, 

Course Descriptions. 100 

Major. 16 

Minor, 89 
Board of Trustees. 212 
Bookstore. 207 
Business Administration 

Course Descriptions, 103 

Major. 17 

Management Information 

Systems, 19 

Management 

Specialization, 17 

Marketing Specialization. 18 



Calendar, 224 
Campus Ministry. 208 
Cancellation of Classes, 177 
Careers and Placement, 208 
Center for Professional 
Development. 188 
Certifications, definition. 7 
Certifications, Majors, and 
Specializations, 4 
Chairs of Academic Divisions. 4 
Change 

of Major, 178 

of Name/Address, 178 

of Status, 178 
Chemistry 

Course Descriptions. 108 

Minor, 89 
Child Welfare Services 

Certification, 20 

Course Descriptions. 110 
Class Attendance, 178 
Classification of Students, 179 
College Directory. 214 
College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP), 173 
College Life, 207 
College Regulations, 168 
Committees, Academic, 218 
Commuter Council, 208 
Compressed Schedule, 179 
Computer Science 

Course Descriptions. 1 1 1 

Major, 21 

Minor, 90 
Math (combined major), 44 
Continuing Education. 188 
Contract Learning. 180 
Cooperative Education, 190 
Cooperative Program, King's 
College, 191 

Core Curriculum Requirements, 9 
Counseling, 208 
Course Descriptions, 95 
Credit-Free Programs, 190. 
Credit Load, 180 
Curricula, The, 4 
D 

Deferred Payment, 195 
Dentistry, Pre-(specialization), 68 
Developmental Education, 191 
Directed Study, 180 
Directory, College, 214 



Dismissal (Academic), 177 

Division Chairs, 4 

Divisions, Academic, 4 

Drop/Add Policy. 182 

E 

Early Admission, 170 

Early Decision, 170 

Early Childhood Education 

Certification, 27 

Education 

Course Descriptions, 114 

Early Childhood, 27 

Elementary, 22 

Special, 32 
Elective Areas of Study 

Course Narratives, 94 

Definition, 7 
Elementary Education (major), 22 
Employment, 201 
Endowed Scholarships, 202 
English 

Course Descriptions, 117 

Major, 37 

Minor, 90 
F 

Faculty, 219 
Faculty Senate, 217 
Fees, Tuition and, 193 
Financial Aid Programs. 196 
Foods and Nutrition. 121 
Course Descriptions, 95 
Foreign Students, 182 
Foreign Study, 191 
Freshman Year Experience, 191 
G 

General Studies (major), 38 
Geography 

Course Descriptions, 122 
Gerontology 

Course Descriptions, 123 

Certification, 39 

Minor, 90 
Grading system, 183 
Graduation Requirements, 183 
Grants, Scholarships and, 196 
Grievance Procedure, 174 
Guaranteed Student 

Loans(Stafford), 199, 205 
H 

Handicapped Students, 184 
Health Services, Student. 210 
History 

Course Descriptions, 125 



INDIA 






Major, 40 

Minor, 91 
Honor Points, 183 
Honors Program, 1 1 
I 

Independent Study, 181 
Institutional Testing 
Requirements, 173 
Interest Waived Policy, 195 
K 

King's College, Cooperative 
Program with, 191 
L 

law, Pre-(specialization), 70 
Leave of Absence, 184 
Liberal Studies (major), 42 
Library, 209 
Loans, 196, 199 
M 

Majors, Certifications and 
Specializations, 4 
Majors, definition, 7 
Management 

Minor, 91 

Specialization, 17 
Management Information 

Systems(Major), 19 
Marketing 

Minor, 91 

Specialization, 18 
Mathematics 

Course Descriptions, 128 

Major, 43 

Minor, 91 
Mathematics/Computer 
Science(combined major), 44 
Medicine, Pre-(specialization), 68 
Medical Technology 

Clinical Associates, 46 

Courses Descriptions, 131 

Major, 45 
Memorial Scholarships, 202 
Minors, definition, 7 
Minors, (narratives and course 
sequences), 89 
Mission Statement, 3 
Music Course Descriptions, 132 
N 
Nursing 

Course Descriptions, 133 

LPN program, 53 

Major, 47 

RN program, 52 

School Nurse, 87 



O 

Occupational Therapy 

Clinical Associates, 60 

Course Descriptions, 139 

Major, 54 
Off-Campus Courses, 184 
Optometry,Pre-(specialization), 68 
P 

Pass/Fail Courses, 185 
Payment Plans, Tuition, 195 
Philosophy 

Course Descriptions, 143 

Minor, 92 
Physical Education 

Course Descriptions, 145 
Physics 

Course Descriptions, 147 
Placement, Careers and, 208 
Political Science 

Course Descriptions, 148 

Minor, 92 
Pre-Dentistry (specialization), 68 
Pre-Law (specialization), 70 
Pre-Medicine (specialization), 68 
Pre-Optometry (specialization), 68 
Pre-Registration, 185 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine 
(specialization), 68 
Prior Learning Assessment, 189 
Probation, 176 
Psychology 

Course Descriptions, 149 

Minor, 92 
R 
Radiography 

Clinical Associates, 86 

Course Descriptions, 152 

Education Specializ., 84 

General Program, 83 

Major, 73 

Management Minor, 85 

Management, 85 
Specialization, 7 
Re-admission, 173 
Refund Policies 

Full-Time Students, 203 

Part-Time Students, 204 
Registration, 185 
Regulations, College, 168 
Religious Sisters of Mercy, 3 
Religious Studies 

Course Descriptions, 156 

Minor, 92 



Repeating Courses, 185 

Residence Halls, 210 

ROTC, 187 

S 

Scholarships, 199, 202 

School Nurse (certification), 87 

Second Degree, 186 

Social Work 

Course Descriptions, 163 

Major, 88 
Sociology 

Course Descriptions, 165 

Elective Area of Study, 94 
Special Education 

Course Descriptions, 165 

Major, 32 
Specializations, Majors, and 
Certifications, 7 
Special Programs, 187 
Stafford Guaranteed Student 
Loans, 199, 205 
Student Activities, 207 
Student Assistance Center, 192 
Student Health Services, 210 
T 

Testing Requirements, 173 
Transfer Students, 168 
Trustees, Board of, 212 
Tuition and Fees, 193 
Tuition Payment Plan 195, 
Tutorial Assistance, 192 
V 

Validation l.xaminations, 178 
Veterans, 192 
Veterinary Medicine, Pre- 
(specialization), 68 
W 

Weekend College, 192 
Withdrawal from College, 186 
Withdrawal from Courses, 186 
Work-Study, 201 
Writing (minor), 93 



* EH 



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